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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29223742/network-analysis-reveals-disrupted-functional-brain-circuitry-in-drug-naive-social-anxiety-disorder
#1
REVIEW
Xun Yang, Jin Liu, Yajing Meng, Mingrui Xia, Zaixu Cui, Xi Wu, Xinyu Hu, Wei Zhang, Gaolang Gong, Qiyong Gong, John A Sweeney, Yong He
Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common and disabling condition characterized by excessive fear and avoidance of public scrutiny. Neuroimaging studies have suggested that the emotional and behavior deficits in SAD are associated with abnormalities in regional brain function and functional connectivity. However, little is known about whether intrinsic functional brain networks in patients with SAD are topologically disrupted. Here, we collected resting-state fMRI data from 33 drug-naive patients with SAD and 32 healthy controls (HC), constructed functional networks with 34 predefined regions based on previous meta-analytic research with task-based fMRI in SAD, and performed network-based statistic and graph-theory analyses...
December 6, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29222403/common-pathophysiology-in-multiple-mouse-models-of-pitt-hopkins-syndrome
#2
Courtney Thaxton, Alexander D Kloth, Ellen P Clark, Sheryl S Moy, Raymond A Chitwood, Benjamin D Philpot
Mutations or deletions of the transcription factor TCF4 are linked to Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) and schizophrenia, suggesting that the precise pathogenic mutations dictate cellular, synaptic, and behavioral consequences. Here we generated two novel mouse models of PTHS-one that mimics the most common pathogenic TCF4 point mutation (human R580W, mouse R579W) and one that deletes three pathogenic arginines-and explored phenotypes of these lines alongside models of pan-cellular or CNS-specific heterozygous Tcf4 disruption...
December 8, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29222069/cooperativity-between-different-trna-modifications-and-their-modification-pathways
#3
REVIEW
Mikołaj Sokołowski, Roland Klassen, Alexander Bruch, Raffael Schaffrath, Sebastian Glatt
Ribonucleotide modifications perform a wide variety of roles in synthesis, turnover and functionality of tRNA molecules. The presence of particular chemical moieties can refine the internal interaction network within a tRNA molecule, influence its thermodynamic stability, contribute novel chemical properties and affect its decoding behavior during mRNA translation. As the lack of specific modifications in the anticodon stem and loop causes disrupted proteome homeostasis, diminished response to stress conditions, and the onset of human diseases, the underlying modification cascades have recently gained particular scientific and clinical interest...
December 5, 2017: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29220865/silver-nano-particles-ameliorate-learning-and-spatial-memory-of-male-wistar-rats-by-prevention-of-amyloid-fibril-induced-neurotoxicity
#4
H Ramshini, A-S Moghaddasi, L-S Aldaghi, N Mollania, A Ebrahim-Habibi
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic degenerative disease characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which results into memory and learning impairments. In the present study, we showed that the aggregates formed by a protein that has no link with Alzheimer's disease, namely the hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), were cytotoxic and decreased spatial learning and memory in rats. The effect of Ag-nano particles (Ag-NPs) was investigated on disruption of amyloid aggregation and preservation of cognitive behavior of rats...
December 8, 2017: Archives Italiennes de Biologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29218791/a-novel-approach-to-training-attention-and-gaze-in-asd-a-feasibility-and-efficacy-pilot-study
#5
Leanne Chukoskie, Marissa Westerfield, Jeanne Townsend
In addition to the social, communicative and behavioral symptoms that define the disorder, individuals with ASD have difficulty re-orienting attention quickly and accurately. Similarly, fast re-orienting saccadic eye movements are also inaccurate and more variable in both endpoint and timing. Atypical gaze and attention are among the earliest symptoms observed in ASD. Disruption of these foundation skills critically affects development of higher level cognitive and social behavior. We propose that interventions aimed at these early deficits that support social and cognitive skills will be broadly effective...
December 8, 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29218071/composite-agency-semiotics-of-modularity-and-guiding-interactions
#6
Alexei A Sharov
Principles of constructivism are used here to explore how organisms develop tools, subagents, scaffolds, signs, and adaptations. Here I discuss reasons why organisms have composite nature and include diverse subagents that interact in partially cooperating and partially conflicting ways. Such modularity is necessary for efficient and robust functionality, including mutual construction and adaptability at various time scales. Subagents interact via material and semiotic relations, some of which force or prescribe actions of partners...
July 2017: Biosemiotics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29217656/anti-inflammatory-effects-of-omega-3-fatty-acids-in-the-brain-physiological-mechanisms-and-relevance-to-pharmacology
#7
REVIEW
Sophie Layé, Agnès Nadjar, Corinne Joffre, Richard P Bazinet
Classically, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were largely thought to be relatively inert structural components of brain, largely important for the formation of cellular membranes. Over the past 10 years, a host of bioactive lipid mediators that are enzymatically derived from arachidonic acid, the main n-6 PUFA, and docosahexaenoic acid, the main n-3 PUFA in the brain, known to regulate peripheral immune function, have been detected in the brain and shown to regulate microglia activation. Recent advances have focused on how PUFA regulate the molecular signaling of microglia, especially in the context of neuroinflammation and behavior...
January 2018: Pharmacological Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29217196/short-term-exposure-to-dim-light-at-night-disrupts-rhythmic-behaviors-and-causes-neurodegeneration-in-fly-models-of-tauopathy-and-alzheimer-s-disease
#8
Mari Kim, Manivannan Subramanian, Yun-Ho Cho, Gye-Hyeong Kim, Eunil Lee, Joong-Jean Park
The accumulation and aggregation of phosphorylated tau proteins in the brain are the hallmarks for the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, disruptions in circadian rhythms (CRs) with altered sleep-wake cycles, dysregulation of locomotion, and increased memory defects have been reported in patients with AD. Drosophila flies that have an overexpression of human tau protein in neurons exhibit most of the symptoms of human patients with AD, including locomotion defects and neurodegeneration. Using the fly model for tauopathy/AD, we investigated the effects of an exposure to dim light at night on AD symptoms...
December 4, 2017: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29215023/a-pilot-characterization-of-the-human-chronobiome
#9
Carsten Skarke, Nicholas F Lahens, Seth D Rhoades, Amy Campbell, Kyle Bittinger, Aubrey Bailey, Christian Hoffmann, Randal S Olson, Lihong Chen, Guangrui Yang, Thomas S Price, Jason H Moore, Frederic D Bushman, Casey S Greene, Gregory R Grant, Aalim M Weljie, Garret A FitzGerald
Physiological function, disease expression and drug effects vary by time-of-day. Clock disruption in mice results in cardio-metabolic, immunological and neurological dysfunction; circadian misalignment using forced desynchrony increases cardiovascular risk factors in humans. Here we integrated data from remote sensors, physiological and multi-omics analyses to assess the feasibility of detecting time dependent signals - the chronobiome - despite the "noise" attributable to the behavioral differences of free-living human volunteers...
December 7, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29214654/role-of-the-innate-immune-system-in-the-neuropathological-consequences-induced-by-adolescent-binge-drinking
#10
REVIEW
María Pascual, Jorge Montesinos, Consuelo Guerri
Adolescence is a critical stage of brain maturation in which important plastic and dynamic processes take place in different brain regions, leading to development of the adult brain. Ethanol drinking in adolescence disrupts brain plasticity and causes structural and functional changes in immature brain areas (prefrontal cortex, limbic system) that result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. These changes, along with secretion of sexual and stress-related hormones in adolescence, may impact self-control, decision making, and risk-taking behaviors that contribute to anxiety and initiation of alcohol consumption...
December 7, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29214513/hyper-response-to-novelty-increases-c-fos-expression-in-the-hippocampus-and-prefrontal-cortex-in-a-rat-model-of-schizophrenia
#11
Tomas Monfil, Rubén Antonio Vázquez Roque, Israel Camacho-Abrego, Hiram Tendilla-Beltran, Tommaso Ianniti, Ivan Meneses-Morales, Patricia Aguilar-Alonso, Gonzalo Flores, Julio Cesar Morales-Medina
Schizophrenia is a debilitating disorder that may have a neurodevelopmental origin. For this reason, animal models based on neonatal insults or manipulations have been extensively used to demonstrate schizophrenia-related behaviors. Among those, the neonatal ventral hippocampus lesion (nVHL) is largely used as a model of schizophrenia-related behavior as it mimics behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities often seen in schizophrenic patients including hyperlocomotion in a novel environment. To investigate the neuroanatomical basis of coding novelty in the nVHL rat, we assessed the behavioral locomotor activity paradigm in a novel environment and measured expression of c-Fos, a marker of neural activation, in brain regions involved in the process of coding novelty or locomotion...
December 6, 2017: Neurochemical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211068/spontaneous-protein-desorption-from-self-assembled-monolayer-sam-coated-gold-nanoparticles
#12
Ranran Tian, Mengbo Luo, Jingyuan Li
When nanoparticles enter blood or other biological fluids, they tend to contact with a variety of proteins which may hamper their application and even bring adverse impacts. Such nonspecific protein binding is usually weak and proteins reach dynamic equilibrium between adsorption and desorption. Studies on the spontaneous desorption of weakly bound proteins should not only be helpful to enrich our understanding about such nonspecific interactions but also shed light on the strategy to avoid nonspecific binding of proteins...
December 6, 2017: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics: PCCP
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29209207/antiepileptic-and-neuroprotective-effects-of-oleamide-in-rat-striatum-on-kainate-induced-behavioral-seizure-and-excitotoxic-damage-via-calpain-inhibition
#13
Hye Yeon Nam, Eun Jung Na, Eunyoung Lee, Youngjoo Kwon, Hwa-Jung Kim
Oleamide was first known as a sleep-inducing fatty acid amide, and later shown to have wide range of neuropharmacological effects upon different neurochemical systems. However, the effects of oleamide on brain damage have scarcely been studied, and the molecular mechanisms and sites of its action remain elusive. Kainic acid (KA) has been used to produce an epileptic animal model that mimics human temporal lobe epilepsy and to induce calpain-activated excitotoxicity, which occurs in numerous neurodegenerative disorders...
2017: Frontiers in Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29209020/a-genotype-first-approach-identifies-an-intellectual-disability-overweight-syndrome-caused-by-phip-haploinsufficiency
#14
Sandra Jansen, Alexander Hoischen, Bradley P Coe, Gemma L Carvill, Hilde Van Esch, Daniëlle G M Bosch, Ulla A Andersen, Carl Baker, Marijke Bauters, Raphael A Bernier, Bregje W van Bon, Hedi L Claahsen-van der Grinten, Jozef Gecz, Christian Gilissen, Lucia Grillo, Anna Hackett, Tjitske Kleefstra, David Koolen, Malin Kvarnung, Martin J Larsen, Carlo Marcelis, Fiona McKenzie, Marie-Lorraine Monin, Caroline Nava, Janneke H Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Rolph Pfundt, Marloes Steehouwer, Servi J C Stevens, Connie T Stumpel, Fleur Vansenne, Mirella Vinci, Maartje van de Vorst, Petra de Vries, Kali Witherspoon, Joris A Veltman, Han G Brunner, Heather C Mefford, Corrado Romano, Lisenka E L M Vissers, Evan E Eichler, Bert B A de Vries
Genotype-first combined with reverse phenotyping has shown to be a powerful tool in human genetics, especially in the era of next generation sequencing. This combines the identification of individuals with mutations in the same gene and linking these to consistent (endo)phenotypes to establish disease causality. We have performed a MIP (molecular inversion probe)-based targeted re-sequencing study in 3,275 individuals with intellectual disability (ID) to facilitate a genotype-first approach for 24 genes previously implicated in ID...
December 5, 2017: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29205791/observation-of-resistive-switching-behavior-in-crossbar-core-shell-ni-nio-nanowires-memristor
#15
Yi-Hsin Ting, Jui-Yuan Chen, Chun-Wei Huang, Ting-Kai Huang, Cheng-Yu Hsieh, Wen-Wei Wu
The crossbar structure of resistive random access memory (RRAM) is the most promising technology for the development of ultrahigh-density devices for future nonvolatile memory. However, only a few studies have focused on the switching phenomenon of crossbar RRAM in detail. The main purpose of this study is to understand the formation and disruption of the conductive filament occurring at the crossbar center by real-time transmission electron microscope observation. Core-shell Ni/NiO nanowires are utilized to form a cross-structure, which restrict the position of the conductive filament to the crosscenter...
December 4, 2017: Small
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29204711/voltage-sensitive-potassium-channels-of-the-bk-type-and-their-coding-genes-are-alcohol-targets-in-neurons
#16
Alex M Dopico, Anna N Bukiya, Jill C Bettinger
Among all members of the voltage-gated, TM6 ion channel superfamily, the proteins that constitute calcium- and voltage-gated potassium channels of large conductance (BK) and their coding genes are unique for their involvement in ethanol-induced disruption of normal physiology and behavior. Moreover, in vitro studies document that BK activity is modified by ethanol with an EC50~23 mM, which is near blood alcohol levels considered legal intoxication in most states of the USA (0.08 g/dL = 17.4 mM). Following a succinct introduction to our current understanding of BK structure and function in central neurons, with a focus on neural circuits that contribute to the neurobiology of alcohol use disorders (AUD), we review the modifications in organ physiology by alcohol exposure via BK and the different molecular elements that determine the ethanol response of BK in alcohol-naïve systems, including the role of an ethanol-recognizing site in the BK-forming slo1 protein, modulation of accessory BK subunits, and their coding genes...
December 5, 2017: Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29203896/proteomic-analysis-of-postsynaptic-proteins-in-regions-of-the-human-neocortex
#17
Marcia Roy, Oksana Sorokina, Nathan Skene, Clémence Simonnet, Francesca Mazzo, Ruud Zwart, Emanuele Sher, Colin Smith, J Douglas Armstrong, Seth G N Grant
The postsynaptic proteome of excitatory synapses comprises ~1,000 highly conserved proteins that control the behavioral repertoire, and mutations disrupting their function cause >130 brain diseases. Here, we document the composition of postsynaptic proteomes in human neocortical regions and integrate it with genetic, functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography imaging, and behavioral data. Neocortical regions show signatures of expression of individual proteins, protein complexes, biochemical and metabolic pathways...
December 4, 2017: Nature Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29203805/a-novel-paradigm-to-study-interpersonal-threat-related-learning-and-extinction-in-children-using-virtual-reality
#18
Hilary A Marusak, Craig A Peters, Aneesh Hehr, Farrah Elrahal, Christine A Rabinak
Disruptions in fear-extinction learning are centrally implicated in a range of stress-related disorders, including anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder. Given that these disorders frequently begin in childhood/adolescence, an understanding of fear-extinction learning in children is essential for (1) detecting the source of developmental susceptibility, (2) identifying mechanisms leading to pathology, and (3) informing the development and/or more judicious application of treatments for youth. Here, we offer and validate a novel virtual reality paradigm to study threat-related learning and extinction in children that models real-world cues, environments, and fear-inducing events that children are likely to experience, and are linked to the development of fear- and stress-related pathologies...
December 4, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29203404/the-imaging-fcs-diffusion-law-in-the-presence-of-multiple-diffusive-modes
#19
Sapthaswaran Veerapathiran, Thorsten Wohland
The cellular plasma membrane is the barrier over which cells exchange materials and communicate with their surroundings, and thus plays the central role in cellular sensing and metabolism. Therefore, the investigation of plasma membrane organization and dynamics is required for understanding of cellular functions. The plasma membrane is a heterogeneous matrix. The presence of structures such as lipid and protein domains and the cytoskeleton meshwork poses a hindrance to the free diffusion of membrane associated biomolecules...
December 1, 2017: Methods: a Companion to Methods in Enzymology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29203124/activation-of-the-hgf-c-met-axis-in-the-tumor-microenvironment-a-multispecies-model
#20
Anna Konstorum, John S Lowengrub
The tumor microenvironment is an integral component in promoting tumor development. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which reside in the tumor stroma, produce Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF), an important trigger for invasive and metastatic tumor behavior. HGF contributes to a pro-tumorigenic environment by activating its cognate receptor, c-Met, on tumor cells. Tumor cells, in turn, secrete growth factors that upregulate HGF production in CAFs, thereby establishing a dynamic tumor-host signaling program...
December 1, 2017: Journal of Theoretical Biology
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