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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649590/enhancing-data-visualisation-to-capture-the-simulator-sickness-phenomenon-on-the-usefulness-of-radar-charts
#1
Romain Chaumillon, Thomas Romeas, Charles Paillard, Delphine Bernardin, Guillaume Giraudet, Jean-François Bouchard, Jocelyn Faubert
The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "The use of transdermal scopolamine to solve methodological issues raised by gender differences in susceptibility to simulator sickness" (Chaumillon et al., 2017) [1]. In an outstanding first demonstration, Kennedy et al. [2] showed that the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) is an appropriate tool to suit the purposes of characterizing motion sickness experienced in virtual environments. This questionnaire has since been used in many scientific studies...
August 2017: Data in Brief
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641682/health-effects-of-airline-cabin-environments-in-simulated-8-hour-flights
#2
(no author information available yet)
INTRODUCTION: Commercial air travel is usually without health incidents. However, there is a view that cabin environments may be detrimental to health, especially flights of 8 h or more. Concerns have been raised about deep vein thrombosis, upper respiratory tract infections, altitude sickness, and toxins from the engines. METHODS: Passenger cabin simulators were used to achieve a comparative observational study with 8-h flights at pressures equivalent to terrestrial altitudes of ground, 4000, 6000, and 8000 ft...
July 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641681/the-effects-of-training-on-anxiety-and-task-performance-in-simulated-suborbital-spaceflight
#3
Rebecca S Blue, Frederick Bonato, Kimberly Seaton, Andrea Bubka, Johnené L Vardiman, Charles Mathers, Tarah L Castleberry, James M Vanderploeg
INTRODUCTION: In commercial spaceflight, anxiety could become mission-impacting, causing negative experiences or endangering the flight itself. We studied layperson response to four varied-length training programs (ranging from 1 h-2 d of preparation) prior to centrifuge simulation of launch and re-entry acceleration profiles expected during suborbital spaceflight. We examined subject task execution, evaluating performance in high-stress conditions. We sought to identify any trends in demographics, hemodynamics, or similar factors in subjects with the highest anxiety or poorest tolerance of the experience...
July 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28634889/the-efficacy-of-airflow-and-seat-vibration-on-reducing-visually-induced-motion-sickness
#4
Sarah D'Amour, Jelte E Bos, Behrang Keshavarz
Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a well-known sensation in virtual environments and simulators, typically characterized by a variety of symptoms such as pallor, sweating, dizziness, fatigue, and/or nausea. Numerous methods to reduce VIMS have been previously introduced; however, a reliable countermeasure is still missing. In the present study, the effect of airflow and seat vibration to alleviate VIMS was investigated. Eighty-two participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups (airflow, vibration, combined airflow and vibration, and control) and then exposed to a 15 min long video of a bicycle ride shot from first-person view...
June 20, 2017: Experimental Brain Research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation Cérébrale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28623924/in-vitro-physiological-and-antibacterial-characterization-of-zno-nanoparticle-composites-in-simulated-porcine-gastric-and-enteric-fluids
#5
Marina S R Barreto, Cristina T Andrade, Luiz Cláudio R P da Silva, Lúcio M Cabral, Vânia M Flosi Paschoalin, Eduardo M Del Aguila
BACKGROUND: Diarrhea in piglets is one of the main causes of animal death after weaning; zinc oxide (ZnO) has been used in high doses for the control of this sickness. The aim of this study was to determine the physicochemical properties of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized and immobilized on a chitosan/alginate (CH/SA) complex and investigate the antimicrobial activity and in vitro release profile of zinc (Zn(2+)) from these new compounds. The ZnO nanoparticles composites were prepared and combined with CH/SA or CH/SA and sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP)...
June 17, 2017: BMC Veterinary Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555125/determinants-of-motion-sickness-in-tilting-trains-coriolis-cross-coupling-stimuli-and-tilt-delay
#6
Giovanni Bertolini, Meek Angela Durmaz, Kim Ferrari, Alexander Küffer, Charlotte Lambert, Dominik Straumann
Faster trains require tilting of the cars to counterbalance the centrifugal forces during curves. Motion sensitive passengers, however, complain of discomfort and overt motion sickness. A recent study comparing different control systems in a tilting train, suggested that the delay of car tilts relative to the curve of the track contributes to motion sickness. Other aspects of the motion stimuli, like the lateral accelerations and the car jitters, differed between the tested conditions and prevented a final conclusion on the role of tilt delay...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538515/effect-of-exposure-to-short-wavelength-light-on-susceptibility-to-motion-sickness
#7
Kyungshil Kim, Kazumi Hirayama, Kazuki Yoshida, Rika Yano, Masayuki Abe, Mika Otsuki, Satoshi Sakuraba, Shinya Sakai
This randomized cross-over study tested the hypothesis that exposure to short-wavelength light induces symptoms of motion sickness (MS). The study participants were 28 healthy adults (14 women; mean age±SD, 25.96±3.11 years). Two stimuli oscillating within a range of 0.4-0.6 Hz were used to induce MS: a blue wave stimulus with short-wavelength light (460 nm) and a green wave stimulus with middle-wavelength light (555 nm). All participants were exposed to both stimuli throughout two separate periods...
July 5, 2017: Neuroreport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533889/effects-of-low-dose-acetazolamide-on-exercise-performance-in-simulated-altitude
#8
Ernst Elisabeth, Gatterer Hannes, Burtscher Johannes, Faulhaber Martin, Pocecco Elena, Burtscher Martin
Preventive effects of acetazolamide (ACZ) on acute mountain sickness (AMS) are well established but effects on exercise performance at high altitude or in hypoxia have been less considered and are still inconsistent. We hypothesized that low-dose ACZ would not impair exercise performance at simulated high altitude. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction between low-dose ACZ and exercise performance in normobaric hypoxia. Sixteen subjects (8 males and 8 females) were randomly assigned either to receive low-dose ACZ (3×125 mg in 36 hours) or placebo...
2017: International Journal of Physiology, Pathophysiology and Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533143/drugs-in-space-pharmacokinetics-and-pharmacodynamics-in-astronauts
#9
REVIEW
Johannes Kast, Yichao Yu, Christoph N Seubert, Virginia E Wotring, Hartmut Derendorf
Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety...
May 19, 2017: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28518001/propranolol-effects-on-decompression-sickness-in-a-simulated-dissub-rescue-in-swine
#10
Angela S Forbes, David P Regis, Aaron A Hall, Richard T Mahon, William A Cronin
INTRODUCTION: Disabled submarine (DISSUB) survivors may face elevated CO2 levels and inert gas saturation, putting them at risk for CO2 toxicity and decompression sickness (DCS). Propranolol was shown to reduce CO2 production in an experimental DISSUB model in humans but its effects on DCS in a DISSUB rescue scenario are unknown. A 100% oxygen prebreathe (OPB) reduces DCS incidence and severity and is incorporated into some DISSUB rescue protocols. We used a swine model of DISSUB rescue to study the effect of propranolol on DCS incidence and mortality with and without an OPB...
April 1, 2017: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28513545/a-study-on-immersion-and-presence-of-a-portable-hand-haptic-system-for-immersive-virtual-reality
#11
Mingyu Kim, Changyu Jeon, Jinmo Kim
This paper proposes a portable hand haptic system using Leap Motion as a haptic interface that can be used in various virtual reality (VR) applications. The proposed hand haptic system was designed as an Arduino-based sensor architecture to enable a variety of tactile senses at low cost, and is also equipped with a portable wristband. As a haptic system designed for tactile feedback, the proposed system first identifies the left and right hands and then sends tactile senses (vibration and heat) to each fingertip (thumb and index finger)...
May 17, 2017: Sensors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400370/the-role-of-specific-visual-subfields-in-collisions-with-oncoming-cars-during-simulated-driving-in-patients-with-advanced-glaucoma
#12
Shiho Kunimatsu-Sanuki, Aiko Iwase, Makoto Araie, Yuki Aoki, Takeshi Hara, Takeo Fukuchi, Sachiko Udagawa, Shinji Ohkubo, Kazuhisa Sugiyama, Chota Matsumoto, Toru Nakazawa, Takuhiro Yamaguchi, Hiroshi Ono
BACKGROUND/AIMS: To assess the role of specific visual subfields in collisions with oncoming cars during simulated driving in patients with advanced glaucoma. METHODS: Normal subjects and patients with glaucoma with mean deviation <-12 dB in both eyes (Humphrey Field Analyzer 24-2 SITA-S program) used a driving simulator (DS; Honda Motor, Tokyo). Two scenarios in which oncoming cars turned right crossing the driver's path were chosen. We compared the binocular integrated visual field (IVF) in the patients who were involved in collisions and those who were not...
October 17, 2016: British Journal of Ophthalmology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28396299/plasma-cytokine-profiling-to-predict-susceptibility-to-acute-mountain-sickness
#13
Hui Lu, Rong Wang, Wenbin Li, Hua Xie, Chang Wang, Ying Hao, Yuhuan Sun, Zhengping Jia
Extensive studies have been performed on acute mountain sickness (AMS), but biomarkers predicting AMS are lacking. Presently, the mainstay methods to identify AMS biomarkers include proteomic and genetic methods at high altitudes or in hypoxic simulated chambers. In the present study, we compared plasma cytokine profiles between AMS-susceptible individuals and AMS-resistant individuals at low altitude by cytokine array analysis. In total, 75 differentially expressed cytokines were identified between AMS-susceptible individuals and AMS-resistant individuals, most involved in inflammation...
November 1, 2016: European Cytokine Network
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28394182/medex2015-greater-sea-level-fitness-is-associated-with-lower-sense-of-effort-during-himalayan-trekking-without-worse-acute-mountain-sickness
#14
Gabriella M K Rossetti, Jamie H Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K Newcombe, Heather M Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, Samuel J Oliver
Rossetti, Gabriella M.K., Jamie H. Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R. Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K. Newcombe, Heather M. Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, and Samuel J. Oliver. MEDEX2015: Greater sea-level fitness is associated with lower sense of effort during Himalayan trekking without worse acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol. 18:152-162, 2017.-This study examined the complex relationships of fitness and hypoxic sensitivity with submaximal exercise responses and acute mountain sickness (AMS) at altitude...
June 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28390649/abbreviated-closure-for-remote-damage-control-laparotomy-in-extreme-environments-a-randomized-trial-of-sutures-versus-wound-clamps-comparing-terrestrial-and-weightless-conditions
#15
Andrew W Kirkpatrick, Jessica Lynn McKee, Colonel Homer Tien, Anthony J LaPorta, Kit Lavell, Tim Leslie, Paul B McBeth, Derek J Roberts, Chad G Ball
INTRODUCTION: Far-Forward Damage Control Laparotomies (DCLs) might provide direct-compression of visceral hemorrhage, however, suturing is a limiting factor, especially for non-physicians. We thus compared abbreviated skin closures comparing skin-suture (SS) versus wound-clamp (WC), on-board a research aircraft in weightlessness (0g) and normal gravity (1g). METHODS: Surgeons conducted DCLs on a surgical-simulator; onboard the hangered-aircraft (1g), or during parabolic flight (0g), randomized to either WC or SS...
May 2017: American Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28387168/numerical-simulation-of-motion-and-deformation-of-healthy-and-sick-red-blood-cell-through-a-constricted-vessel-using-hybrid-lattice-boltzmann-immersed-boundary-method
#16
Amir Hassanzadeh, Nader Pourmahmoud, Abdolrahman Dadvand
In the present article, hybrid lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method is utilized to simulate two-dimensional incompressible viscous flow involving flexible immersed red blood cell (RBC) in a microchannel. The main focus of the present research is to study motion and deformation of both healthy and sick RBCs in a vessel with different sizes of stenosis. The presented computational results consent reasonably well with the available data in the literature. Two different channels i.e. a simple and a constricted channel are investigated in the present manuscript...
May 2017: Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383854/-high-fidelity-simulation-a-new-tool-for-learning-and-research-in-pediatrics
#17
REVIEW
I Bragard, N Farhat, M-C Seghaye, K Schumacher
Caring for a sick child represents a high risk activity that requires technical and non-technical skills related to several factors such as the rarity of certain events or the stress of caring for a child. As regard these conditions, medi¬cal simulation provides a learning environment without risk, the control of variables, the reproducibility of situations, and the confrontation with rare events. In this article, we des¬cribe the steps of a simulation session and outline the current knowledge of the use of simulation in paediatrics...
October 2016: Revue Médicale de Liège
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28378077/new-dimensions-in-surgical-training-immersive-virtual-reality-laparoscopic-simulation-exhilarates-surgical-staff
#18
Tobias Huber, Markus Paschold, Christian Hansen, Tom Wunderling, Hauke Lang, Werner Kneist
INTRODUCTION: Virtual reality (VR) and head mount displays (HMDs) have been advanced for multimedia and information technologies but have scarcely been used in surgical training. Motion sickness and individual psychological changes have been associated with VR. The goal was to observe first experiences and performance scores using a new combined highly immersive virtual reality (IVR) laparoscopy setup. METHODS: During the study, 10 members of the surgical department performed three tasks (fine dissection, peg transfer, and cholecystectomy) on a VR simulator...
April 4, 2017: Surgical Endoscopy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28352318/establishment-and-evaluation-of-an-experimental-rat-model-for-high-altitude-intestinal-barrier-injury
#19
Han Luo, Dai-Jun Zhou, Zhang Chen, Qi-Quan Zhou, Kui Wu, Kun Tian, Zhi-Wei Li, Zhen-Liang Xiao
In the present study an experimental high-altitude intestinal barrier injury rat model was established by simulating an acute hypoxia environment, to provide an experimental basis to assess the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of altitude sickness. A total of 70 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: Control group (group C) and a high-altitude hypoxia group (group H). Following 2 days adaptation, the rats in group H were exposed to a simulated 4,000-m, high-altitude hypoxia environment for 3 days to establish the experimental model...
February 2017: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28336003/efficacy-of-a-titanium-dioxide-nanoparticles-based-indoor-anti-odor-product-as-assessed-by-electronic-nose-and-gaschromatography-mass-spectrometry
#20
Mara Mirasoli, Roberto Gotti, Massimo Di Fusco, Giulia Basaglia, Jessica Fiori, Aldo Roda
Indoor air pollutants and odorants may have psychological and physical impact on exposed individuals and the unpleasant room air is considered as one of the factors associated with sick building syndrome comprising general symptoms such as headache and lethargy. Approaches for improving the quality of indoor air are thus important as support for human health and well-being. Photo-oxidation catalyzed by titanium dioxide (TiO2), is one of the methods used for elimination of volatile organic compounds, which are the cause of odor nuisance in indoor and outdoor air...
March 9, 2017: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis
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