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Lgbt disparities

Daniel Demant, Leanne Hides, Katherine M White, David J Kavanagh
INTRODUCTION: Research shows disproportionate levels of substance use among sexual minority young people. A range of reasons for these disparities have been suggested, including connectedness to and participation in the LGBT community. Little is known about how these constructs are related to substance use involvement in sexual minority (sub)groups or how these relationships are affected by other factors. METHODS: 1266 young sexual minority Australians completed a cross-sectional online survey...
January 29, 2018: Addictive Behaviors
Hannah Brooks, Carrie D Llewellyn, Tom Nadarzynski, Fernando Castilho Pelloso, Felipe De Souza Guilherme, Alex Pollard, Christina J Jones
BACKGROUND: Significant health disparities between sexual minority individuals (that is, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender [LGBT]) and heterosexual individuals have been demonstrated. AIM: To understand the barriers and facilitators to sexual orientation (SO) disclosure experienced by LGBT adults in healthcare settings. DESIGN AND SETTING: Mixed methods systematic review, including qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods papers following PRISMA guidelines...
March 2018: British Journal of General Practice: the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners
Alicia K Matthews, Elizabeth Breen, Priyoth Kittiteerasack
OBJECTIVES: To describe the extant literature on social determinants of health as they relate to the cancer disparities and to highlight the research findings relating to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. DATA SOURCES: Published scientific literature and clinical literature, and published reports from the World Health Organization and US Department of Health and Human Services. CONCLUSION: The larger literature on health inequities is moving beyond individual-level predictors of risk to evaluate the influence of social determinants of health on the persistent health inequalities in a population...
January 17, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Ulrike Boehmer
OBJECTIVE: To describe lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals' barriers to accessing and receiving quality cancer care. DATA SOURCES: Published data on cancer care and studies of LGBT individuals. CONCLUSION: There is a clustering of barriers among LGBT individuals, which suggests multiple inequities exist in LGBT individuals' cancer care, although data on disparities along the cancer control continuum are not consistently available...
January 12, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
David Rice, Matthew B Schabath
OBJECTIVES: To synthesize state of the knowledge collected in this volume and propose future directions for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cancer practice, education, research, and advocacy. DATA SOURCES: Current and extant literature. CONCLUSION: Health care disparities that are known but not yet fully elucidated in the LGBT population carry into the cancer arena. Substantially more effort is required in the domains of patient care, nursing practice, nursing and patient-facing services provider education, patient education, nursing and interprofessional research, governmental commitment, professional organization action, and patient advocacy...
January 9, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Marc Ceres, Gwendolyn P Quinn, Matthew Loscalzo, David Rice
OBJECTIVES: To describe the current state of cancer screening and uptake for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons and to propose cancer screening considerations for LGBT persons. DATA SOURCES: Current and historic published literature on cancer screening and LGBT cancer screening; published national guidelines. CONCLUSION: Despite known cancer risks for members of the LGBT community, cancer screening rates are often low, and there are gaps in screening recommendations for LGBT persons...
January 8, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Asa Radix, Shail Maingi
OBJECTIVES: To define and give an overview of the importance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cultural competency and offer some initial steps on how to improve the quality of care provided by oncology nurses and other health care professionals. DATA SOURCES: A review of the existing literature on cultural competency. CONCLUSION: LGBT patients experience cancer and several other diseases at higher rates than the rest of the population...
January 8, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Christopher F Drescher, Eliot J Lopez, James A Griffin, Thomas M Toomey, Elizabeth D Eldridge, Lara M Stepleman
BACKGROUND: Smoking prevalence for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals is higher than for heterosexual, cisgender individuals. Elevated smoking rates have been linked to psychiatric comorbidities, substance use, poverty, low education levels, and stress. OBJECTIVES: This study examined mental health (MH) correlates of cigarette use in LGBT individuals residing in a metropolitan area in the southeastern United States. METHODS: Participants were 335 individuals from an LGBT health needs assessment (mean age 34...
January 5, 2018: Substance Use & Misuse
Ronald O Valdiserri, David R Holtgrave, Tonia C Poteat, Chris Beyrer
LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) populations experience disparities in health outcomes, both physical and mental, compared to their heterosexual and cis-gender peers. This commentary confronts the view held by some researchers that the disparate rates of mental health problems reported among LGBT populations are the consequences of pursuing a particular life trajectory, rather than resulting from the corrosive and persistent impact of stigma. Suggesting that mental health disparities among LGBT populations arise internally, de novo, when individuals express non-heterosexual and non-conforming gender identities ignores the vast body of evidence documenting the destructive impact of socially-mediated stigma and systemic discrimination on health outcomes for a number of minorities, including sexual and gender minorities...
January 3, 2018: Journal of Homosexuality
Charles Kamen
OBJECTIVE: To discuss lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-specific survivorship issues including: integrating sexual and gender minority identities with cancer survivor identities; coordinating medical care and disclosing identities to health care providers; dealing with late effects of treatment; and addressing LGBT family and relationship issues. DATA SOURCES: Published articles, quotes from an online survey of 311 LGBT survivors. CONCLUSION: The transition from active cancer treatment to survivorship presents challenges, and LGBT cancer survivors may face additional challenges as they enter the survivorship phase...
December 20, 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Robert W S Coulter, Melina Bersamin, Stephen T Russell, Christina Mair
PURPOSE: We tested three competing models about whether gender- and sexuality-based harassment at school have nonindependent, additive, or interactive effects on adolescents' electronic cigarette use (i.e., vaping), cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and heavy episodic drinking (HED). We also tested whether harassment mediated substance use disparities between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) adolescents and their cisgender heterosexual peers. METHODS: We analyzed cross-sectional data from the 2013-2014 California Healthy Kids Survey, including 316,766 students in grades 7, 9, and 11 from more than 1,500 middle and high schools...
December 11, 2017: Journal of Adolescent Health: Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine
Emily J Noonan, Susan Sawning, Ryan Combs, Laura A Weingartner, Leslee J Martin, V Faye Jones, Amy Holthouser
Phenomenon: Transgender patients experience discrimination, limited access to care, and inadequate provider knowledge in healthcare settings. Medical education to address transgender-specific disparities is lacking. Research that engages transgender community members may help address health disparities by empowering patients, increasing trust, and informing medical curricula to increase competence. APPROACH: A 2015 Community Forum on Transgender Health Care was hosted at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, which included healthcare professionals and transgender community members to facilitate dialogue among mixed-participant groups using a World Café model...
November 30, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
Stuart Michaels, Carolina Milesi, Michael Stern, Melissa Heim Viox, Heather Morrison, Paul Guerino, Christina N Dragon, Samuel C Haffer
PURPOSE: The goal of this research is to advance the study of health disparities faced by older sexual and gender minorities by assessing comprehension of and improving measures of sexual and gender identity in surveys. METHODS: Cognitive interviews were conducted by expert interviewers with 48 non-lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (non-LGBT) and 9 LGBT older English and Spanish speakers. RESULTS: All respondents were able to answer questions about their sex assigned at birth and current gender identity successfully despite some cisgender respondents' lack of clear understanding of the transgender response option...
December 2017: LGBT Health
Meghan Romanelli, Kimberly D Hudson
Access to effective services is imperative to address the many health and mental health disparities that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people face. This population, however, remains underserved and often ill-served in health care environments. Furthermore, interactions between system- and individual-level dimensions of access create barriers to service engagement. Within much of the extant literature surrounding health care barriers among LGBT people, the rich narratives and varied experiences of LGBT community members from diverse backgrounds have often been excluded...
2017: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Charles A Emlet, Karen I Fredriksen-Goldsen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Aging Today
Michael Adams, Aaron D Tax
SAGE and its partners have been focused on bridging the chasm between the greater need that LGBT older adults have for care, services, and supports, and the lower rate at which they access them, compared with their heterosexual and cisgender counterparts. The chasm is caused by discrimination, social isolation, disproportionate poverty and health disparities, and a lack of access to culturally competent providers. SAGE has used federal administrative and legislative advocacy to encourage the Aging Network to bridge this chasm by assessing and meeting the needs of LGBT older adults that can be addressed via the programs created under the Older Americans Act...
December 2017: LGBT Health
Amy L Gower, Myriam Forster, Kari Gloppen, Abigail Z Johnson, Marla E Eisenberg, John E Connett, Iris W Borowsky
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth experience disproportionate rates of bullying compared to their heterosexual peers. Schools are well-positioned to address these disparities by creating supportive school climates for LGBT youth, but more research is needed to examine the variety of practices and professional development opportunities put in place to this end. The current study examines how school practices to create supportive LGBT student climate relate to student reports of bullying. Student-level data come from the 2013 Minnesota Student Survey, a state-wide survey of risk and protective factors...
October 14, 2017: Prevention Science: the Official Journal of the Society for Prevention Research
Michele J Eliason, Predair Robinson, Kimberly Balsam
No studies to date have examined health literacy among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals, nor considered whether LGB-specific health literacy might be a contributing factor to well-documented health disparities in LGB populations. This pilot study gathered online survey data from a national convenience sample of 232 LGB adults age 40 and older. A scale developed specifically for this study had 10 items related to general health literacy and 10 items related to LGB-specific health information and skills...
September 28, 2017: Health Communication
Susan Sawning, Stacie Steinbock, Rachel Croley, Ryan Combs, Ann Shaw, Toni Ganzel
BACKGROUND: Individuals who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT), gender nonconforming, and/or born with differences of sex development have specific health needs and significant health disparities exacerbated by a lack of training among health professionals. The University of Louisville LGBT Health Certificate Program used an interdisciplinary approach to increase training, potentially enabling future physicians to provide quality healthcare to LGBT patients. METHODS: A pretest-post-test design was used to investigate medical students' (n = 39) attitude and knowledge outcomes after program participation...
May 2017: Education for Health: Change in Training & Practice
Gilly Hartal, Orna Sasson-Levy
In this paper we stress the need for specifically located understandings of the concept of homonationalism, by introducing an analysis of spatial and political power relations dissecting disparate constructions of LGBT arenas. The paper explores three spaces: Tel-Aviv - an urban space of LGBT belonging, Jerusalem - the Israeli capital where being an LGBT individual is problematic both in public and in private spaces and Kiryat-Shmona - a conservative and peripheral underprivileged town in the north of Israel...
September 13, 2017: Journal of Homosexuality
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