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rivaroxaban pulmonary embolism

Erin R Weeda, Philip S Wells, W Frank Peacock, Gregory J Fermann, Christopher W Baugh, Veronica Ashton, Concetta Crivera, Peter Wildgoose, Jeff R Schein, Craig I Coleman
We sought to compare length-of-stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and readmissions among pulmonary embolism (PE) patients treated with rivaroxaban versus parenterally bridged warfarin. We identified adult PE (primary diagnostic code = 415.1x) patients in the Premier Database (11/2012-9/2015), and included those with ≥1 PE diagnostic test on days 0-2. Rivaroxaban users (allowing ≤2 days of prior parenteral therapy) were 1:1 propensity score matched to patients parenterally bridged to warfarin. LOS, total costs, and readmission for venous thromboembolism (VTE) or major bleeding within the same or subsequent 2 months were compared between cohorts...
October 18, 2016: Internal and Emergency Medicine
Jay M Margolis, Steven Deitelzweig, Jeffrey Kline, Oth Tran, David M Smith, Concetta Crivera, Brahim Bookhart, Jeff Schein
PURPOSE: Using real-world data, this study compares inpatient length of stay (LOS) and costs for patients with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) initiating treatment with oral anticoagulation with rivaroxaban versus warfarin. METHODS: Hospitalizations from MarketScan's Hospital Drug Database were selected from November 1, 2012, through December 31, 2013, for adults with a primary diagnosis of PE initiating treatment with rivaroxaban or warfarin. Warfarin patients were matched 1:1 to rivaroxaban patients using exact and propensity score matching...
October 14, 2016: Clinical Therapeutics
Julie A Fusco, Eric J Paulus, Alexandra R Shubat, Sharminara Miah
A 62-year-old African American man received unintentional duplicate anticoagulation therapy with warfarin 5 mg and rivaroxaban 20 mg daily for the treatment of recurrent pulmonary embolism. The patient presented to the anticoagulation clinic 6 days after hospital discharge with an International Normalized Ratio (INR) of 2.3 and he was instructed to continue warfarin 5 mg daily. Seven days later, he returned to the clinic with an INR >8.0 using a point-of-care device. He denied any signs or symptoms of bleeding...
December 2015: Drug Saf Case Rep
Marijan Bosevski, Elizabeta Srbinovska-Kostovska
BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis, known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), are associated with a high proportion of morbidity and mortality. AIM: Aim of this review is to emphasise current diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for VTE. RESULTS: No differences have been noticed in European and American guidelines in diagnostic approach of this disorder. Today there is enough clinical information for the use of heparin (either, unfractionated or low molecular) and vitamin K antagonists in the treatment of acute and chronic phases of VTE...
September 15, 2016: Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences
Simon Mantha, Eva Laube, Yimei Miao, Debra M Sarasohn, Rekha Parameswaran, Samantha Stefanik, Gagandeep Brar, Patrick Samedy, Jonathan Wills, Stephen Harnicar, Gerald A Soff
Low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has been the standard of care for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. Rivaroxaban was approved in 2012 for the treatment of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), but no prior studies have been reported specifically evaluating the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban for cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT). Under a Quality Assessment Initiative (QAI), we established a Clinical Pathway to guide rivaroxaban use for CAT and now report a validation analysis of our first 200 patients...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
Christos Voukalis, Gregory Y H Lip, Eduard Shantsila
INTRODUCTION: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. The approval of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) as antithrombotic alternatives to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) has offered more treatment options to physicians for the prevention of VTE recurrence, fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) and long-term complications. Four NOACs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) that have been approved for the treatment of acute VTE following large phase III trials, where NOACs demonstrated similar efficacy and superior safety profile compared to VKAs...
October 2016: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Jun-Wen Wang, Bradley Chen, Po-Chun Lin, Shih-Hsiang Yen, Chung-Cheng Huang, Feng-Chih Kuo
BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid (TXA) was reportedly to decrease postoperative blood loss after standard total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the blood-conservation effect of TXA in minimally invasive TKA, in particular, receiving a direct oral anticoagulant was unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of combined use of TXA and rivaroxaban on postoperative blood loss in primary minimally invasive TKA. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, controlled trial, 198 patients were assigned to placebo (98 patients, normal saline injection) and study group (100 patients, 1g TXA intraoperative injection) during primary unilateral minimally invasive TKA...
August 27, 2016: Journal of Arthroplasty
Walter Ageno, Alexander G G Turpie
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising both deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a serious and common cardiovascular disease associated with the risk of chronic complications, recurrent VTE events and even death. The treatment landscape has, in recent years, seen a paradigm shift from the use of traditional anticoagulants (low-molecular-weight heparin [LMWH] overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist [VKA]) to non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This class of agents, encompassing direct factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors have shown non-inferior efficacy and better safety to standard of care in randomised controlled trials (RCTs)...
September 14, 2016: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Stephanie Law, Daljit Ghag, Eric Grafstein, Robert Stenstrom, Devin Harris
OBJECTIVES: Patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) (deep vein thrombosis [DVT] and pulmonary embolism [PE]) are commonly treated as outpatients. Traditionally, patients are anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and warfarin, resulting in return visits to the ED. The direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) medications do not require therapeutic monitoring or repeat visits; however, they are more expensive. This study compared health costs, from the hospital and patient perspectives, between traditional versus DOAC therapy...
September 2016: CJEM
Massimo Franchini, Pier Mannuccio Mannucci
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate)...
September 2016: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
L Loganathan, A Hua, S Patel, C Gibbons, M P Vizcaychipi
Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend rivaroxaban for VTE prevention. Amid concerns over bleeding complications, the modified thromboprophylaxis policy of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital (CWH; London, UK) advises enoxaparin given after surgery in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. This retrospective study investigated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in this novel, modified venous-prophylaxis regimen in a surgical orthopaedic cohort at CWH...
September 2016: Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England
Stacy A Johnson, G Paul Eleazer, Matthew T Rondina
Older adults have a significantly greater risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, than younger adults. The cause of this greater risk is thought to be multifactorial, including age-related changes in hemostatic factors and greater comorbid conditions and hospitalizations, but is not completely understood. Moreover, VTE remains underrecognized in older adults and may present atypically. Thus, a low index of clinical suspicion is essential when evaluating older adults with possible VTE...
September 2016: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Erin R Weeda, Christine G Kohn, W Frank Peacock, Gregory J Fermann, Concetta Crivera, Jeff R Schein, Craig I Coleman
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To compare hospital length of stay (LOS) and hospital treatment costs in low-risk patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) anticoagulated with rivaroxaban or heparin bridging to warfarin therapy. DESIGN: Retrospective review of electronic health records and hospital billing records. SETTING: Large, teaching hospital in the northeastern United States. PATIENTS: One hundred ninety adults with objectively confirmed acute PE presenting to the emergency department between November 1, 2012, and May, 12, 2015, who were classified as low risk of early mortality and received anticoagulation with either rivaroxaban or heparin (i...
October 2016: Pharmacotherapy
Adam J Singer, Jim Xiang, Christopher Kabrhel, Gino J Merli, Charles Pollack, Victor F Tapson, Peter Wildgoose, W Frank Peacock
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Traditionally, patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) are admitted from the emergency department and treated with low molecular weight heparin followed by warfarin. Several studies now demonstrate that it is possible to identify low-risk PE patients that can safely be treated as outpatients. The advent of the direct-acting oral anticoagulants such as rivaroxaban has made it easier than ever to manage patients outside of the hospital. This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial aimed at testing the hypothesis that low-risk PE patients can be safely and effectively managed at home using rivaroxaban, resulting in fewer days of hospitalization than standard of care treatment...
August 18, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Marcello Di Nisio, Maria C Vedovati, Antoni Riera-Mestre, Martin H Prins, Katharina Mueller, Alexander T Cohen, Philip S Wells, Jan Beyer-Westendorf, Paolo Prandoni, Henri Bounameaux, Dagmar Kubitza, Jonas Schneider, Ron Pisters, Jan Fedacko, Ricardo Fontes-Carvalho, Anthonie W A Lensing
The pharmacokinetics of oral rivaroxaban are highly predictable and only affected to a limited extent by bodyweight; therefore, dose adjustments for bodyweight are not required. However, this raises concerns among physicians for potential under- or overdosing. This substudy of the randomised EINSTEIN DVT and EINSTEIN PE trials, which compared rivaroxaban with enoxaparin/vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy, aimed to determine the incidence of major bleeding in patients with a low bodyweight and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with a high bodyweight during rivaroxaban or enoxaparin/VKA therapy...
September 27, 2016: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Erin R Weeda, Philip S Wells, W Frank Peacock, Gregory J Fermann, Christopher W Baugh, Veronica Ashton, Concetta Crivera, Peter Wildgoose, Jeff R Schein, Craig I Coleman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 1, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Steven Deitelzweig, François Laliberté, Concetta Crivera, Guillaume Germain, Brahim K Bookhart, William H Olson, Jeffrey Schein, Patrick Lefebvre
PURPOSE: Compared with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and warfarin, the oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban has advantages, such as simplified care, that may lead to less health care resource utilization. METHODS: A retrospective, matched-cohort analysis was conducted using claims dated between January 2011 and December 2013 from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan databases. Adult patients who had a primary diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) during an outpatient or emergency room (ER) visit after November 2, 2012, and who were treated with rivaroxaban or LMWH/warfarin on the same day, were identified...
August 2016: Clinical Therapeutics
A T Cohen, M Hamilton, A Bird, S A Mitchell, S Li, R Horblyuk, S Batson
BACKGROUND: Historically, warfarin or aspirin have been the recommended therapeutic options for the extended treatment (>3 months) of VTE. Data from Phase III randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are now available for non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in this indication. The current systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) were conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of anticoagulants for the extended treatment of VTE. METHODS: Electronic databases (accessed July 2014 and updated April 2016) were systematically searched to identify RCTs evaluating apixaban, aspirin, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, and warfarin for the extended treatment of VTE...
2016: PloS One
Matej Samoš, Tomáš Bolek, Jela Ivanková, Lucia Stančiaková, František Kovář, Peter Galajda, Peter Kubisz, Ján Staško, Marián Mokáň
Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a life or limb threatening thrombotic thrombocytopenia. HIT is traditionally treated with factor-IIa inhibitors such as bivalirudin, lepirudin or argatroban. However, these agents usually require parenteral administration and are not generally available in all countries. Recently, several experiences with novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) administration to treat HIT had been reported. NOACs generally offer advantages such as consistent and predictable anticoagulation, oral administration with good patient compliance and a good safety profile...
July 16, 2016: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology
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