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Bacteria evolution

Jeremy B Yoder
Decades of research on the evolution of mutualism has generated a wealth of possible ways whereby mutually beneficial interactions between species persist in spite of the apparent advantages to individuals that accept the benefits of mutualism without reciprocating - but identifying how any particular empirical system is stabilized against cheating remains challenging. Different hypothesized models of mutualism stability predict different forms of coevolutionary selection, and emerging high-throughput sequencing methods allow examination of the selective histories of mutualism genes and, thereby, the form of selection acting on those genes...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Botany
Yanhua Cui, Tingting Xu, Xiaojun Qu, Tong Hu, Xu Jiang, Chunyu Zhao
Streptococcus thermophilus is one of the most valuable homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria, which, for a long time, has been widely used as a starter for the production of fermented dairy products. The key production characteristics of S. thermophilus, for example the production of extracellular polysaccharide, proteolytic enzymes and flavor substances as well as acidifying capacity etc., have an important effect on the quality of dairy products. The acidification capacity of the strains determines the manufacturing time and quality of dairy products...
October 12, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Pankaj Trivedi, Chanda Trivedi, Jasmine Grinyer, Ian C Anderson, Brajesh K Singh
Plant health and productivity is strongly influenced by their intimate interaction with deleterious and beneficial organisms, including microbes, and insects. Of the various plant diseases, insect-vectored diseases are of particular interest, including those caused by obligate parasites affecting plant phloem such as Candidatus (Ca.) Phytoplasma species and several species of Ca. Liberibacter. Recent studies on plant-microbe and plant-insect interactions of these pathogens have demonstrated that plant-microbe-insect interactions have far reaching consequences for the functioning and evolution of the organisms involved...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Theresia E B Stradal, Sonia C P Costa
A key aspect of bacterial pathogenesis is the colonization and persistence within the host and, later on, its dissemination to new niches. During evolution, bacteria developed a myriad of virulence mechanisms to usurp the host's sophisticated defense mechanisms in order to establish their colonization niche. Elucidation of the highly dynamic and complex interactions between host and pathogens remains an important field of study. Here, we highlight the conserved manipulation of the actin cytoskeleton by some Gram-negative gastrointestinal pathogens, addressing the role of type III secreted bacterial GEFs at the different steps of pathogenesis...
October 16, 2016: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Y Lin, W Zhao, Z D Shi, H R Gu, X T Zhang, X Ji, X T Zou, J S Gong, W Yao
Meat duck deep litter is considered to be an ideal environment for the evolution of bacterial antibiotic resistance if it is under poor management. The aim of this study was to characterize the accumulation of antibiotics and heavy metals in the deep litter and their role in the persistence of antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli, and evaluate the service life of the deep litter. Samples were collected from initial, middle, and final stages of deep litter within 3 barns (zero, 4, and 8 rounds of meat duck fattening, d 34) and 9 flocks, with known consumption of antibiotics in the controlled trail...
October 14, 2016: Poultry Science
Georgia Sioupouli, George Lambrinidis, Emmanuel Mikros, Sotiris Amillis, George Diallinas
NCS1 proteins are H(+) or Na(+) symporters responsible for the uptake of purines, pyrimidines or related metabolites in bacteria, fungi and some plants. Fungal NCS1 are classified into two evolutionary and structurally distinct subfamilies, known as Fur- and Fcy-like transporters. These subfamilies have expanded and functionally diversified by gene duplications. The Fur subfamily of the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans includes both major and cryptic transporters specific for uracil, 5-fluorouracil, allantoin or/and uric acid...
October 14, 2016: Molecular Microbiology
Randy Chi Fai Cheung, Tzi Bun Ng, Jack Ho Wong
Antifreeze proteins are ice-binding or ice-structuring proteins that prevent water from freezing by adsorbing to the ice surface and stopping the growth of minute ice crystals to large crystals in a non-colligative manner. The antifreeze proteins are found in species like fish, arthropods, plants, algae, fungi, yeasts and bacteria. The diversity, distribution and classification of antifreeze proteins were highlighted in this review. Antifreeze proteins help the organisms adapt to and survive in subzero temperature environments...
October 12, 2016: Current Protein & Peptide Science
Pauline D Scanlan, Anna M Bischofberger, Alex R Hall
Although experiments indicate that the abiotic environment plays an important role in bacterial interactions with their parasitic viruses (bacteriophages or phages), it is not yet clear how exposure to compounds present in nature alters the impact of phages on bacterial growth and evolution. To address this question we exposed Escherichia coli K12 MG1655, in combination with three lytic phages, to various substances that natural and clinical microbial populations are likely to encounter: bile salts (present in mammalian gastrointestinal tracts), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, a common surfactant in cleaning and hygiene products), and four antibiotics (present at variable concentrations in natural and clinical environments)...
October 12, 2016: FEMS Microbiology Ecology
Qiang Zheng, Yanting Liu, Christian Jeanthon, Rui Zhang, Wenxin Lin, Jicheng Yao, Nianzhi Jiao
: Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB) are thought to be important players in oceanic carbon and energy cycling in the euphotic zone of the ocean. The genus Citromicrobium, widely found in oligotrophic oceans, is a member of marine alphaproteobacterial AAPB. Nine Citromicrobium strains isolated from the South China Sea, the Mediterranean Sea or the tropical South Atlantic were found to harbor identical 16S rRNA sequences. The sequencing of their genomes revealed high synteny in major regions...
October 7, 2016: Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Peter J Christie
Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative and -positive bacteria employ type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) to translocate DNA and protein substrates, generally by contact-dependent mechanisms, to other cells. The T4SSs functionally encompass two major subfamilies, the conjugation systems and the effector translocators. The conjugation systems are responsible for interbacterial transfer of antibiotic resistance genes, virulence determinants, and genes encoding other traits of potential benefit to the bacterial host...
October 2016: EcoSal Plus
Daniela Numberger, Daniel P R Herlemann, Klaus Jürgens, Guido Dehnhardt, Heide Schulz-Vogt
The gut microbiota has many beneficial effects on host metabolism and health, and its composition is determined by numerous factors. It is also assumed that there was a co-evolution of mammals and the bacteria inhabiting their gut. Current knowledge of the mammalian gut microbiota mainly derives from studies on humans and terrestrial animals, whereas those on marine mammals are sparse. However, they could provide additional information on influencing factors, such as the role of diet and co-evolution with the host...
October 2016: MicrobiologyOpen
Arnold L Demain, Evan Martens
We are pleased to dedicate this paper to Dr Julian E Davies. Julian is a giant among microbial biochemists. He began his professional career as an organic chemistry PhD student at Nottingham University, moved on to a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia University, then became a lecturer at the University of Manchester, followed by a fellowship in microbial biochemistry at Harvard Medical School. In 1965, he studied genetics at the Pasteur Institute, and 2 years later joined the University of Wisconsin in the Department of Biochemistry...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Antibiotics
Rita Puglisi, Robert Yan, Salvatore Adinolfi, Annalisa Pastore
Iron sulfur clusters are essential universal prosthetic groups which can be formed inorganically but, in biology, are bound to proteins and produced enzymatically. Most of the components of the machine that produces the clusters are conserved throughout evolution. In bacteria, they are encoded in the isc operon. Previous reports provide information on the role of specific components but a clear picture of how the whole machine works is still missing. We have carried out a study of the effects of the co-chaperone HscB from the model system E...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences
Alexandre Duprey, William Nasser, Simon Léonard, Céline Brochier-Armanet, Sylvie Reverchon
After a gene duplication event, the resulting paralogous genes frequently acquire distinct expression profiles, roles and/or functions but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. While transcription start site (TSS) turnover, i.e. the repositioning of the TSS during evolution, is widespread in eukaryotes, it is less documented in Bacteria. Using pelD and pelE, two closely related paralogous genes encoding key virulence factors in Dickeya, a gamma proteobacterial genus of phytopathogens, we show that pelE has been selected as an initiator of bacterial aggression, while pelD acts at a later stage, thanks to modifications in the transcriptional regulation of these two genes...
October 11, 2016: FEBS Journal
Abiola Olumuyiwa Olaitan, Jean-Marc Rolain
Antibiotic resistance is an ancient biological mechanism in bacteria, although its proliferation in our contemporary world has been amplified through antimicrobial therapy. Recent studies conducted on ancient environmental and human samples have uncovered numerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance genes. The resistance genes that have been reported from the analysis of ancient bacterial DNA include genes coding for several classes of antibiotics, such as glycopeptides, β-lactams, tetracyclines, and macrolides...
August 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Yohei Tashiro, Yuki Kimura, Maiko Furubayashi, Akira Tanaka, Kei Terakubo, Kyoichi Saito, Shigeko Kawai-Noma, Daisuke Umeno
LuxR family transcriptional regulators are the core components of quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria and exert their effects through binding to the signaling molecules acyl-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). The function of the LuxR homologs is remarkably plastic, and naturally occurring acyl-HSLs are structurally diverse. To investigate the molecular basis of the functional plasticity of Vibrio fischeri LuxR, we directed the evolution of LuxR toward three different specificities in the laboratory. We found an orthogonal pair of LuxR mutants specific either to 3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone or to 3-oxo-octanoyl homoserine lactone...
October 3, 2016: Journal of General and Applied Microbiology
Amparo Latorre, Alejandro Manzano-Marín
Symbiosis has played a major role in eukaryotic evolution beyond the origin of the eukaryotic cell. Thus, organisms across the tree of life are associated with diverse microbial partners, conferring to the host new adaptive traits that enable it to explore new niches. This is the case for insects thriving on unbalanced diets, which harbor mutualistic intracellular microorganisms, mostly bacteria that supply them with the required nutrients. As a consequence of the lifestyle change, from free-living to host-associated mutualist, a bacterium undergoes many structural and metabolic changes, of which genome shrinkage is the most dramatic...
October 10, 2016: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Ruifu Yang, Yujun Cui, Yujing Bi
Yersinia pestis is a typical zoonotic bacterial pathogen. The following reasons make this pathogen a model for studying zoonotic pathogens: (1) Its unique lifestyle makes Y. pestis an ideal model for studying host-vector-environment-pathogen interactions; (2) population diversity characters in Y. pestis render it a model species for studying monomorphic bacterial evolution; (3) the pathogenic features of bacteria provide us with good opportunities to study human immune responses; (4) typical animal and vector models of Y...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Didier Bouchon, Martin Zimmer, Jessica Dittmer
Bacterial symbionts represent essential drivers of arthropod ecology and evolution, influencing host traits such as nutrition, reproduction, immunity, and speciation. However, the majority of work on arthropod microbiota has been conducted in insects and more studies in non-model species across different ecological niches will be needed to complete our understanding of host-microbiota interactions. In this review, we present terrestrial isopod crustaceans as an emerging model organism to investigate symbiotic associations with potential relevance to ecosystem functioning...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Thomas Brown, Xavier Didelot, Daniel J Wilson, Nicola De Maio
Bacteria can exchange genetic material, or acquire genes found in the environment. This process, generally known as bacterial recombination, can have a strong impact on the evolution and phenotype of bacteria, for example causing the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, but can also disrupt phylogenetic and transmission inferences. With the increasing affordability of whole genome sequencing, the need has emerged for an efficient simulator of bacterial evolution to test and compare methods for phylogenetic and population genetic inference, and for simulation-based estimation...
January 19, 2016: Microbial Genomics
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