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Brain, spine, balance

M Martinez-Morga, M P Quesada-Rico, C Bueno, S Martinez
AIM: To know the neural processes linked to the activity of brain circuits in order to understand the consequences of their dysfunction and their role in the development of neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). DEVELOPMENT: The activity of neuronal circuits is the neurobiological basis of behavior and mental activity (emotions, memory and thoughts). The processes of differentiation of neural cells and the formation of circuits by synaptic contacts between neurons (synaptogenesis) occur in the central nervous system during the late stages of prenatal development and the first months after birth...
March 1, 2018: Revista de Neurologia
Annalisa Nobili, Paraskevi Krashia, Alberto Cordella, Livia La Barbera, Maria Concetta Dell'Acqua, Angela Caruso, Annabella Pignataro, Ramona Marino, Francesca Sciarra, Filippo Biamonte, Maria Luisa Scattoni, Martine Ammassari-Teule, Francesco Cecconi, Nicola Berretta, Flavio Keller, Nicola Biagio Mercuri, Marcello D'Amelio
Imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission cause brain network dysfunction and are central to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders. Parvalbumin interneurons are highly implicated in this imbalance. Here, we probed the social behavior and hippocampal function of mice carrying a haploinsufficiency for Ambra1, a pro-autophagic gene crucial for brain development. We show that heterozygous Ambra1 mice (Ambra+/- ) are characterized by loss of hippocampal parvalbumin interneurons, decreases in the inhibition/excitation ratio, and altered social behaviors that are solely restricted to the female gender...
February 27, 2018: Molecular Neurobiology
Mario Ricciardi
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in small animal practice is largely based on classic two-dimensional spin-echo, inversion recovery and gradient-echo sequences which are largely limited by low spatial resolution, especially in low-field (LF)-MRI scanners. Nowadays, however, the availability of volumetric sequences can open new perspectives and enhance the diagnostic potential of this imaging modality. Balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) is a three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence in which image contrast is given by the ratio of T2 and T1, resulting in low soft-tissue signal, poor cerebral grey/white matter distinction and a bright signal from free fluid and fat...
January 4, 2018: Veterinary Research Communications
Charley Gros, Benjamin De Leener, Sara M Dupont, Allan R Martin, Michael G Fehlings, Rohit Bakshi, Subhash Tummala, Vincent Auclair, Donald G McLaren, Virginie Callot, Julien Cohen-Adad, Michaël Sdika
During the last two decades, MRI has been increasingly used for providing valuable quantitative information about spinal cord morphometry, such as quantification of the spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. However, despite the significant improvement of MR sequences adapted to the spinal cord, automatic image processing tools for spinal cord MRI data are not yet as developed as for the brain. There is nonetheless great interest in fully automatic and fast processing methods to be able to propose quantitative analysis pipelines on large datasets without user bias...
December 6, 2017: Medical Image Analysis
H F Williams
This work makes proposals on the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and hydrocephalus that changes over time with the evolution of the disease. This includes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) filling mechanism that leads to an increase in mode pressure if excess fluid volume exacerbates the obstructive process. Elevation in mode occurs because pressure in the central nervous system (CNS) represents a state of reduced flow, rather than an abnormality of volume. Diseases that cause elevated mode pressure by means of a primary edema can lead to hydrocephalus if there is sufficient time and obstruction to flow for the filling mechanism to act...
October 2017: Medical Hypotheses
Danielle N Adank, Mary M Lunzer, Cody J Lensing, Stacey L Wilber, Amy M Gancarz, Carrie Haskell-Luevano
Central administration of melanocortin ligands has been used as a critical technique to study energy homeostasis. While intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection is the most commonly used method during these investigations, intrathecal (IT) injection can be equally efficacious for the central delivery of ligands. Importantly, intrathecal administration can optimize exploration of melanocortin receptors in the spinal cord. Herein, we investigate comparative IT and ICV administration of two melanocortin ligands, the synthetic MTII (Ac-Nle-c[Asp-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-NH2) MC4R agonist and agouti-related peptide [AGRP(87-132)] MC4R inverse agonist/antagonist, on the same batch of age-matched mice in TSE metabolic cages undergoing a nocturnal satiated paradigm...
October 19, 2017: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
Tori L Schaefer, Matthew H Davenport, Lindsay M Grainger, Chandler K Robinson, Anthony T Earnheart, Melinda S Stegman, Anna L Lang, Amy A Ashworth, Gemma Molinaro, Kimberly M Huber, Craig A Erickson
BACKGROUND: Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) occurs as a result of a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) and subsequent loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. Loss of FMRP alters excitatory/inhibitory signaling balance, leading to increased neuronal hyperexcitability and altered behavior. Acamprosate (the calcium salt of N-acetylhomotaurinate), a drug FDA-approved for relapse prevention in the treatment of alcohol dependence in adults, is a novel agent with multiple mechanisms that may be beneficial for people with FXS...
2017: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Andras Bilkei-Gorzo, Onder Albayram, Astrid Draffehn, Kerstin Michel, Anastasia Piyanova, Hannah Oppenheimer, Mona Dvir-Ginzberg, Ildiko Rácz, Thomas Ulas, Sophie Imbeault, Itai Bab, Joachim L Schultze, Andreas Zimmer
The balance between detrimental, pro-aging, often stochastic processes and counteracting homeostatic mechanisms largely determines the progression of aging. There is substantial evidence suggesting that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is part of the latter system because it modulates the physiological processes underlying aging. The activity of the ECS declines during aging, as CB1 receptor expression and coupling to G proteins are reduced in the brain tissues of older animals and the levels of the major endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are lower...
June 2017: Nature Medicine
Margot Putukian
CONTEXT: The sideline assessment of concussion is challenging, given its variable presentations, the limited sensitivity and specificity of sideline assessment tools, and how the presentation of the injury evolves over time. In addition, the diagnostic process, as well as the tools used to assess and manage concussion, continue to progress as research and what we know about concussion advance. This paper focuses on the initial assessment on the sideline by reviewing the concussion-evaluation literature, drawing from clinical experience to emphasize a standardized approach, and underscoring the importance of both familiarity with the athlete and clinical judgment...
March 2017: Journal of Athletic Training
Hui Qiao, Shu-Cheng An, Chang Xu, Xin-Ming Ma
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorder, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Increasing evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the structural plasticity induced by depression. Considering the opposite effects of BDNF and its precursor proBDNF on neural plasticity, we hypothesized that the balance of BDNF and proBDNF plays a critical role in chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS)-induced depressive-like behaviors and structural plasticity in the rodent hippocampus...
May 15, 2017: Brain Research
Silvia Ripamonti, Mateusz C Ambrozkiewicz, Francesca Guzzi, Marta Gravati, Gerardo Biella, Ingo Bormuth, Matthieu Hammer, Liam P Tuffy, Albrecht Sigler, Hiroshi Kawabe, Katsuhiko Nishimori, Mauro Toselli, Nils Brose, Marco Parenti, JeongSeop Rhee
Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons...
February 23, 2017: ELife
Tamsin Newton-Snow
Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a rare genetic disorder that occurs in an estimated one in 35,000 people. The condition is often life-limiting and involves tumours growing on the nervous system, typically on the hearing nerves, brain and spine. While the tumours are mainly benign, they can lead to hearing loss, deafness and problems with balance and mobility. Most patients will need surgery or other treatments for NF2-related brain or spinal cord tumours at some point in their lives.
January 18, 2017: Nursing Standard
Wei Li, Lei Ma, Guang Yang, Wen-Biao Gan
The functions and underlying mechanisms of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep remain unclear. Here we show that REM sleep prunes newly formed postsynaptic dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the mouse motor cortex during development and motor learning. This REM sleep-dependent elimination of new spines facilitates subsequent spine formation during development and when a new motor task is learned, indicating a role for REM sleep in pruning to balance the number of new spines formed over time. Moreover, REM sleep also strengthens and maintains newly formed spines, which are critical for neuronal circuit development and behavioral improvement after learning...
March 2017: Nature Neuroscience
Subhash C Gupta, Aparna Ravikrishnan, Jinxu Liu, Zhihao Mao, Ratnamala Pavuluri, Brandon G Hillman, Pauravi J Gandhi, Dustin J Stairs, Ming Li, Rajesh R Ugale, Daniel T Monaghan, Shashank M Dravid
Despite strong evidence for NMDA receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction as an underlying factor for cognitive disorders, the precise roles of various NMDAR subtypes remains unknown. The GluN2C-containing NMDARs exhibit unique biophysical properties and expression pattern, and lower expression of GluN2C subunit has been reported in postmortem brains from schizophrenia patients. We found that loss of GluN2C subunit leads to a shift in cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance towards greater inhibition. Specifically, pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of GluN2C knockout mice have reduced mEPSC frequency and dendritic spine density and a contrasting higher frequency of mIPSCs...
December 6, 2016: Scientific Reports
Quinton Sawyer, Brian Vesci, Tamara C Valovich McLeod
Reference: Schneider KJ, Iverson GL, Emery CA, McCrory P, Herring SA, Meeuwisse WH. The effects of rest and treatment following sport-related concussion: a systematic review of the literature. Br J Sports Med. 2013;47(5):304-307. CLINICAL QUESTION: After concussion and a period of symptom-limited physical and cognitive rest, do athletes who experience intermittent symptoms return to asymptomatic condition more quickly with physical activity than with prolonged physical rest? DATA SOURCES: One investigator performed an individual search for each research question using the following databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Controlled Trials Registers, EMBASE, HealthSTAR, ProQuest, PsychInfo, PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and Web of Science...
September 2016: Journal of Athletic Training
Wenqi Li, Megan E Allen, Yanfang Rui, Li Ku, Guanglu Liu, Andrew N Bankston, James Q Zheng, Yue Feng
Two distinct protein cofactors, p35 and p39, independently activate Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), which plays diverse roles in normal brain function and the pathogenesis of many neurological diseases. The initial discovery that loss of p35 impairs neuronal migration in the embryonic brain prompted intensive research exploring the function of p35-dependent Cdk5 activity. In contrast, p39 expression is restricted to the postnatal brain and its function remains poorly understood. Despite the robustly increased Cdk5 activity during neuronal differentiation, which activator is responsible for enhancing Cdk5 activation and how the two distinct activators direct Cdk5 signaling to govern neuronal network formation and function still remains elusive...
November 2, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Elena Popugaeva, Ekaterina Pchitskaya, Ilya Bezprozvanny
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the disease of lost memories. Synaptic loss is a major reason for memory defects in AD. Signaling pathways involved in memory loss in AD are under intense investigation. The role of deranged neuronal calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling in synaptic loss in AD is described in this review. Familial AD (FAD) mutations in presenilins are linked directly with synaptic Ca(2+) signaling abnormalities, most likely by affecting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) leak function of presenilins. Excessive ER Ca(2+) release via type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyanR2) is observed in AD spines due to increase in expression and function of RyanR2...
February 19, 2017: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Mar Cuadrado-Tejedor, Carolina Garcia-Barroso, Juan A Sánchez-Arias, Obdulia Rabal, Marta Pérez-González, Sara Mederos, Ana Ugarte, Rafael Franco, Victor Segura, Gertrudis Perea, Julen Oyarzabal, Ana Garcia-Osta
The targeting of two independent but synergistic enzymatic activities, histone deacetylases (HDACs, class I and HDAC6) and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5), has recently been validated as a potentially novel therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we report the discovery of a new first-in-class small-molecule (CM-414) that acts as a dual inhibitor of PDE5 and HDACs. We have used this compound as a chemical probe to validate this systems therapeutics strategy, where an increase in the activation of cAMP/cGMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) induced by PDE5 inhibition, combined with moderate HDAC class I inhibition, leads to efficient histone acetylation...
January 2017: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Kurt A Sailor, Matthew T Valley, Martin T Wiechert, Hermann Riecke, Gerald J Sun, Wayne Adams, James C Dennis, Shirin Sharafi, Guo-Li Ming, Hongjun Song, Pierre-Marie Lledo
In the mammalian brain, the anatomical structure of neural circuits changes little during adulthood. As a result, adult learning and memory are thought to result from specific changes in synaptic strength. A possible exception is the olfactory bulb (OB), where activity guides interneuron turnover throughout adulthood. These adult-born granule cell (GC) interneurons form new GABAergic synapses that have little synaptic strength plasticity. In the face of persistent neuronal and synaptic turnover, how does the OB balance flexibility, as is required for adapting to changing sensory environments, with perceptual stability? Here we show that high dendritic spine turnover is a universal feature of GCs, regardless of their developmental origin and age...
July 20, 2016: Neuron
Giovanni Morelli, Ariel Avila, Stylianos Ravanidis, Najat Aourz, Rachael L Neve, Ilse Smolders, Robert J Harvey, Jean-Michel Rigo, Laurent Nguyen, Bert Brône
The development of the cerebral cortex is a complex process that requires the generation, migration, and differentiation of neurons. Interfering with any of these steps can impair the establishment of connectivity and, hence, function of the adult brain. Neurotransmitter receptors have emerged as critical players to regulate these biological steps during brain maturation. Among them, α2 subunit-containing glycine receptors (GlyRs) regulate cortical neurogenesis and the present work demonstrates the long-term consequences of their genetic disruption on neuronal connectivity in the postnatal cerebral cortex...
March 1, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
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