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Decision theory

Geoffrey R O Durso, Pablo Briñol, Richard E Petty
Research has shown that people who feel powerful are more likely to act than those who feel powerless, whereas people who feel ambivalent are less likely to act than those whose reactions are univalent (entirely positive or entirely negative). But what happens when powerful people also are ambivalent? On the basis of the self-validation theory of judgment, we hypothesized that power and ambivalence would interact to predict individuals' action. Because power can validate individuals' reactions, we reasoned that feeling powerful strengthens whatever reactions people have during a decision...
October 21, 2016: Psychological Science
Marieke Voshaar, Johanna Vriezekolk, Sandra van Dulmen, Bart van den Bemt, Mart van de Laar
BACKGROUND: Although disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the cornerstone of treatment for inflammatory rheumatic diseases, medication adherence to DMARDs is often suboptimal. Effective interventions to improve adherence to DMARDs are lacking, and new targets are needed to improve adherence. The aim of the present study was to explore patients' barriers and facilitators of optimal DMARD use. These factors might be used as targets for adherence interventions. METHODS: In a mixed method study design, patients (n = 120) with inflammatory arthritis (IA) completed a questionnaire based on an existing adapted Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify facilitators and barriers of DMARD use...
October 21, 2016: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Percival G Matthews, Mark R Lewis
Although many researchers theorize that primitive numerosity processing abilities may lay the foundation for whole number concepts, other classes of numbers, like fractions, are sometimes assumed to be inaccessible to primitive architectures. This research presents evidence that the automatic processing of nonsymbolic magnitudes affects processing of symbolic fractions. Participants completed modified Stroop tasks in which they selected the larger of two symbolic fractions while the ratios of the fonts in which the fractions were printed and the overall sizes of the compared fractions were manipulated as irrelevant dimensions...
October 20, 2016: Cognitive Science
Eric Smart, Adeeta Aulakh, Carolyn McDougall, Patty Rigby, Gillian King
PURPOSE: Identify strategies youth perceive will optimize their engagement in goal pursuit in life skills and transition programs using an engagement framework involving affective, cognitive, and behavioral components. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive design was used. Two semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven youth. The first was informed by a prior observation session, and the second occurred after the program ended and explored youths' perceptions of whether and how their engagement changed...
October 21, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Yueran Yang, Max Guyll, Stephanie Madon
This article presents a new model of confessions referred to as the interrogation decision-making model. This model provides a theoretical umbrella with which to understand and analyze suspects' decisions to deny or confess guilt in the context of a custodial interrogation. The model draws upon expected utility theory to propose a mathematical account of the psychological mechanisms that not only underlie suspects' decisions to deny or confess guilt at any specific point during an interrogation, but also how confession decisions can change over time...
October 20, 2016: Law and Human Behavior
Amy Blake, Bryan T Carroll
OBJECTIVE: This paper analyses how game theory can provide a framework for understanding the strategic decision-making that occurs in everyday scenarios in medical training and practice, and ultimately serves as a tool for improving the work environment and patient care. Game theory has been applied to a variety of fields outside of its native economics, but has not been thoroughly studied in the context of health care provision. METHODS: The paper discusses four of the most common 'games' and applies each to a scenario in medicine to provide new insight on the incentives and drivers for certain types of behaviour and a deeper understanding of why certain results are valued more strongly than others...
November 2016: Medical Education
Perry J Williams, Mevin B Hooten
Statistical decision theory (SDT) is a sub-field of decision theory that formally incorporates statistical investigation into a decision-theoretic framework to account for uncertainties in a decision problem. SDT provides a unifying analysis of three types of information: statistical results from a data set, knowledge of the consequences of potential choices (i.e., loss), and prior beliefs about a system. SDT links the theoretical development of a large body of statistical methods, including point estimation, hypothesis testing, and confidence interval estimation...
September 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Sheng-Miauh Huang, Pei-Ling Hsieh, Yvonne Hsiung, Ling-Ming Tseng, Ping-Ho Chen, Chia Tai Hung
BACKGROUND: Previous studies indicate that women with cancer experience infertility after cancer-related treatment. With the rapid progress in fertility science, women face diverse and uncertain choices regarding pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to understand the decision-making process regarding fertility choices among reproductive-age women with cancer in Taiwan. METHODS: Grounded theory methodology guided data collection using in-depth interviews with 18 women diagnosed and treated for cancer...
October 6, 2016: Cancer Nursing
Jessica Shaw, Rebecca Campbell, Debi Cain
Prior research has documented the problematic community response to sexual assault: the majority of sexual assaults reported to police are never prosecuted. Social dominance theory suggests that this response is a form of institutional discrimination, intended to maintain existing social structures, and that police personnel likely draw upon shared ideologies to justify their decision-making in sexual assault case investigations. This study drew upon social dominance theory to examine how police justified their investigatory decisions to identify potential leverage points for change...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Community Psychology
Arash Shaban-Nejad, Maxime Lavigne, Anya Okhmatovskaia, David L Buckeridge
Population health decision makers must consider complex relationships between multiple concepts measured with differential accuracy from heterogeneous data sources. Population health information systems are currently limited in their ability to integrate data and present a coherent portrait of population health. Consequentially, these systems can provide only basic support for decision makers. The Population Health Record (PopHR) is a semantic web application that automates the integration and extraction of massive amounts of heterogeneous data from multiple distributed sources (e...
October 17, 2016: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Carmit K McMullen, Joanna E Bulkley, Andrea Altschuler, Christopher S Wendel, Marcia Grant, Mark C Hornbrook, Virginia Sun, Robert S Krouse
BACKGROUND: Eliciting the priorities of cancer survivors is essential to address the specific needs of cancer survivor subgroups. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe the greatest challenges related to treatment for long-term rectal cancer survivors. DESIGN: This was an observational study with a cross-sectional survey. SETTINGS: The study included members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California and Northwest health plans...
November 2016: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
Julie A Sorensen, Pamela J Tinc, Rebecca Weil, David Droullard
Risk behaviors are key drivers of occupationally related injuries and illnesses, considerably impacting the uptake and success of injury interventions, technologies, and practices. This is certainly true in the agricultural sector, where farmers often ignore recommended safety practices or have even been known to disable safety technologies. Although research studies have characterized specific individual safety or risk behaviors, few studies have thoroughly examined farmers' risk and safety orientations or how these develop in response to environmental and societal exposures...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Agromedicine
Joseph Henny, Anne Vassault, Guilaine Boursier, Ines Vukasovic, Pika Mesko Brguljan, Maria Lohmander, Irina Ghita, Francisco A Bernabeu Andreu, Christos Kroupis, Ludek Sprongl, Marc H M Thelen, Florent J L A Vanstapel, Tatjana Vodnik, Willem Huisman, Michel Vaubourdolle
This document is based on the original recommendation of the Expert Panel on the Theory of Reference Values of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC), updated guidelines were recently published under the auspices of the IFCC and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). This document summarizes proposals for recommendations on: (i) The terminology, which is often confusing, noticeably concerning the terms of reference limits and decision limits. (ii) The method for the determination of reference limits according to the original procedure and the conditions, which should be used...
October 14, 2016: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: CCLM
Miranda C Staples, Chitra D Mandyam
Alcohol use disorder currently affects approximately 18 million Americans, with at least half of these individuals having significant cognitive impairments subsequent to their chronic alcohol use. This is most widely apparent as frontal cortex-dependent cognitive dysfunction, where executive function and decision-making are severely compromised, as well as hippocampus-dependent cognitive dysfunction, where contextual and temporal reasoning are negatively impacted. This review discusses the relevant clinical literature to support the theory that cognitive recovery in tasks dependent on the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus is temporally different across extended periods of abstinence from alcohol...
2016: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Nathan Young, Marianne Corriveau, Vivian M Nguyen, Steven J Cooke, Scott G Hinch
This article examines how potential users of scientific and local/traditional/experiential knowledge evaluate new claims to knowing, using 67 interviews with government employees and non-governmental stakeholders involved in co-managing salmon fisheries in Canada's Fraser River. Research has consistently shown that there are major obstacles to moving new knowledge into policy, management, and public domains. New concepts such as Knowledge Exchange (KE) and Knowledge Mobilization (KMb) are being used to investigate these obstacles, but the processes by which potential users evaluate (sometimes competing) knowledge claims remain poorly understood...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Environmental Management
Robert F Kushner
Provision of dietary counseling in the office setting is enhanced by using team-based care and electronic tools. Effective provider-patient communication is essential for fostering behavior change: the key component of lifestyle medicine. The principles of communication and behavior change are skill-based and grounded in scientific theories and models. Motivational interviewing and shared decision making, a collaboration process between patients and their providers to reach agreement about a health decision, is an important process in counseling...
November 2016: Medical Clinics of North America
Sari Ahlqvist-Björkroth, Zack Boukydis, Anna Margareta Axelin, Liisa Lehtonen
Parents of preterm infants commonly experience separation from their infant or exclusion from their role as primary caregivers during the hospital care of their infant, which may impair parent-infant bonding and parents' psychological well-being. Therefore, we developed the Close Collaboration with Parents™ intervention to improve staff skills in communicating and collaborating with parents in neonatal intensive care units (NICU), to increase parents' presence and participation into infant care, and to improve parent-infant bonding and, thereby, parents' psychological well-being and later child development...
October 12, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Frances Buttelmann, David Buttelmann
The ability to attribute and represent others' mental states (e.g., beliefs; so-called "theory of mind") is essential for participation in human social interaction. Despite a considerable body of research using tasks in which protagonists in the participants' attentional focus held false or true beliefs, the question of automatic belief attribution to bystander agents has received little attention. In the current study, we presented adults and 6-year-olds (N=92) with an implicit computer-based avoidance false-belief task in which participants were asked to place an object into one of three boxes...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
John V Petrocelli, Asher L Rubin, Ryan L Stevens
Experiential and associative learning are essential to optimal decision making. However, research shows that, even when exposed to repeated trials, people often fail to learn probabilities and cause/effect covariations. Consistent with the counterfactual inflation hypothesis, it is proposed that counterfactuals can interfere with memory of repeated exposures and therefore inhibit learning. Five experimental studies tested counterfactual thinking as a potential mechanism underlying this learning deficit using a simple, biased coin flipping paradigm...
October 13, 2016: Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin
Julie Easley, Baukje Miedema, June C Carroll, Donna P Manca, Mary Ann O'Brien, Fiona Webster, Eva Grunfeld
OBJECTIVE: To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. SETTING: Canada. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. METHODS: This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists...
October 2016: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
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