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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318818/twitch-mouth-pressure-for-detecting-respiratory-muscle-weakness-in-suspicion-of-neuromuscular-disorder
#1
Dante Brasil Santos, Gilbert Desmarais, Line Falaize, Adam Ogna, Sandrine Cognet, Bruno Louis, David Orlikowski, Hélène Prigent, Frédéric Lofaso
Twitch mouth pressure using magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves and an automated inspiratory trigger is a noninvasive, non-volitional assessment of diaphragmatic strength. Our aims were to validate this method in patients with suspected neuromuscular disease, to determine the best inspiratory-trigger pressure threshold, and to evaluate whether twitch mouth pressure decreased the overdiagnosis of muscle weakness frequently observed with noninvasive volitional tests. Maximal inspiratory pressure, sniff nasal pressure, and twitch mouth pressure were measured in 112 patients with restrictive disease and suspected neuromuscular disorder...
February 2, 2017: Neuromuscular Disorders: NMD
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28302142/maximum-inspiratory-pressure-as-a-clinically-meaningful-trial-endpoint-for-neuromuscular-diseases-a-comprehensive-review-of-the-literature
#2
REVIEW
Benedikt Schoser, Edward Fong, Tarekegn Geberhiwot, Derralynn Hughes, John T Kissel, Shyam C Madathil, David Orlikowski, Michael I Polkey, Mark Roberts, Harm A W M Tiddens, Peter Young
Respiratory muscle strength is a proven predictor of long-term outcome of neuromuscular disease (NMD), including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and spinal muscular atrophy. Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), a sensitive measure of respiratory muscle strength, one of several useful tests of respiratory muscle strength, is gaining interest as a therapeutic clinical trial endpoint for NMD. In this comprehensive review we investigate the use of MIP as a measure of respiratory muscle strength in clinical trials of therapeutics targeting respiratory muscle, examine the correlation of MIP with survival, quality of life, and other measures of pulmonary function, and outline the role of MIP as a clinically significantly meaningful outcome measure...
March 16, 2017: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28288302/whole-body-active-warm-up-and-inspiratory-muscle-warm-up-do-not-improve-running-performance-when-carrying-thoracic-loads
#3
Mark A Faghy, Peter Ian Brown
Whole body active warm ups (AWU) and inspiratory muscle warm up (IMW) prior to exercise improves performance on some endurance exercise tasks. This study investigated the effects of AWU with and without IMW upon 2.4 km running time-trial performance while carrying a 25 kg backpack, a common task and backpack load in physically demanding occupations. Participants (n = 9) performed five 2.4 km running time-trials with a 25 kg thoracic load preceded in random order by 1) IMW comprising 2 x 30 inspiratory efforts against a pressure-threshold load of 40 % maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax), 2) 10 min unloaded running (AWU) at lactate turnpoint (10...
March 13, 2017: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28286249/immediate-effects-of-respiratory-muscle-stretching-on-chest-wall-kinematics-and-electromyography-in-copd-patients
#4
Rafaela Barros de Sá, Maíra Florentino Pessoa, Ana Gabriela Leal Cavalcanti, Shirley Lima Campos, César Amorim, Armèle Dornelas de Andrade
This study evaluated the immediate effects of respiratory muscle stretching on chest wall kinematics and electromyographic activity in COPD patients. 28 patients with COPD were randomized into two groups: 14 to the treatment group (TG) and 14 to the control group (CG). The TG underwent a stretching protocol of the rib cage muscles, while the CG remained at rest under similar conditions. After a single session, TG increased the tidal volume of the pulmonary rib cage (Vrcp) (p=0.020) and tidal volume of abdominal rib cage (Vrca) (p=0...
March 10, 2017: Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284044/diaphragm-thickness-and-inspiratory-muscle-functions-in-chronic-stroke-patients
#5
Minkyu Kim, Kyeongbong Lee, Jieun Cho, Wanhee Lee
BACKGROUND The aims of this study are to investigate the difference between the diaphragm thickness at end expiration and the thickness at total lung capacity (TLC), and to examine differences in inspiratory muscle function between stroke patients and healthy individuals. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty-five stroke patients and 49 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Diaphragm thickness was measured at end expiration and at TLC by ultrasonography. The maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), peak inspiratory flow (PIF), vital capacity (VC), and inspiratory muscle endurance (IME) were assess to evaluate inspiratory muscle function...
March 11, 2017: Medical Science Monitor: International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28281869/clinimetric-properties-of-the-pressure-biofeedback-unit-method-for-estimating-respiratory-pressures
#6
Ana Paula da Silva, Rayele Pricila Moreira Dos Santos, Patrícia Chaves Coertjens, Marcelo Coertjens
OBJECTIVE: The Pressure Biofeedback Unit (PBU) is used to assess the transversus abdominis muscle activity in order to determine the effectiveness of segmental stabilization, but not to verify its accuracy for measuring the pressure values of breathing from transversus abdominis activation. The objective of this study was to cross-validate the PBU pressure evaluated in transversus abdominis muscle activation with the respiratory pressure assessed through manovacuometry in order to verify the extent to which the PBU can be used to indirectly evaluate the strength of the respiratory muscle in both men and women and verify the reliability of the methods...
March 10, 2017: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28280321/transdiaphragmatic-pressure-and-neural-respiratory-drive-measured-during-inspiratory-muscle-training-in-stable-patients-with-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease
#7
Weiliang Wu, Xianming Zhang, Lin Lin, Yonger Ou, Xiaoying Li, Lili Guan, Bingpeng Guo, Luqian Zhou, Rongchang Chen
PURPOSE: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) is a rehabilitation therapy for stable patients with COPD. However, its therapeutic effect remains undefined due to the unclear nature of diaphragmatic mobilization during IMT. Diaphragmatic mobilization, represented by transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi), and neural respiratory drive, expressed as the corrected root mean square (RMS) of the diaphragmatic electromyogram (EMGdi), both provide vital information to select the proper IMT device and loads in COPD, therefore contributing to the curative effect of IMT...
2017: International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28278163/the-role-of-the-inspiratory-muscle-weakness-in-functional-capacity-in-hemodialysis-patients
#8
Pedro Henrique Scheidt Figueiredo, Márcia Maria Oliveira Lima, Henrique Silveira Costa, Rosalina Tossige Gomes, Camila Danielle Cunha Neves, Evandro Silveira de Oliveira, Frederico Lopes Alves, Vanessa Gomes Brandão Rodrigues, Emílio Henrique Barroso Maciel, Cláudio Heitor Balthazar
INTRODUCTION: Inspiratory muscle function may be affected in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), further worsening the functional loss in these individuals. However, the impact of inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) on the functional capacity (FC) of hemodialysis patients remains unknown. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the impact of IMW on FC in ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ESRD patients on hemodialysis treatment for more than six months were evaluated for inspiratory muscle strength and FC...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28269565/evaluating-respiratory-muscle-activity-using-a-wireless-sensor-platform
#9
Luis Estrada, Abel Torres, Leonardo Sarlabous, Raimon Jane
Wireless sensors are an emerging technology that allows to assist physicians in the monitoring of patients health status. This approach can be used for the non-invasive recording of the electrical respiratory muscle activity of the diaphragm (EMGdi). In this work, we acquired the EMGdi signal of a healthy subject performing an inspiratory load test. To this end, the EMGdi activity was captured from a single channel of electromyography using a wireless platform which was compared with the EMGdi and the inspiratory mouth pressure (Pmouth) recorded with a conventional lab equipment...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28269111/time-frequency-representations-of-the-sternocleidomastoid-muscle-electromyographic-signal-recorded-with-concentric-ring-electrodes
#10
Luis Estrada, Abel Torres, Javier Garcia-Casado, Leonardo Sarlabous, Gema Prats-Boluda, Raimon Jane
The use of non-invasive methods for the study of respiratory muscle signals can provide clinical information for the evaluation of the respiratory muscle function. The aim of this study was to evaluate time-frequency characteristics of the electrical activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscle recorded superficially by means of concentric ring electrodes (CREs) in a bipolar configuration. The CREs enhance the spatial resolution, attenuate interferences, as the cardiac activity, and also simplify the orientation problem associated to the electrode location...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28269080/convolutive-blind-source-separation-on-surface-emg-signals-for-respiratory-diagnostics-and-medical-ventilation-control
#11
Herbert Buchner, Eike Petersen, Marcus Eger, Philipp Rostalski
The electromyogram (EMG) is an important tool for assessing the activity of a muscle and thus also a valuable measure for the diagnosis and control of respiratory support. In this article we propose convolutive blind source separation (BSS) as an effective tool to pre-process surface electromyogram (sEMG) data of the human respiratory muscles. Specifically, the problem of discriminating between inspiratory, expiratory and cardiac muscle activity is addressed, which currently poses a major obstacle for the clinical use of sEMG for adaptive ventilation control...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28265169/effect-of-inspiratory-muscle-training-on-respiratory-capacity-and-walking-ability-with-subacute-stroke-patients-a-randomized-controlled-pilot-trial
#12
Kyeong-Man Jung, Dae-Hyouk Bang
[Purpose] To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory capacity and walking ability in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received inspiratory muscle training for 30 minutes (six sets of five-minutes) and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks...
February 2017: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28265153/comparison-of-differences-in-respiratory-function-and-pressure-as-a-predominant-abnormal-movement-of-children-with-cerebral-palsy
#13
Hae-Yeon Kwon
[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine differences in respiratory function and pressure among three groups of children with cerebral palsy as a predominant abnormal movement which included spastic type, dyskinetic type, and ataxic type. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three children with cerebral palsy of 5-13 years of age in I-III levels according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System, the study subjects were divided by stratified random sampling into three groups of spastic type, dyskinetic type, and ataxic type...
February 2017: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28260875/the-immediate-effect-of-soft-tissue-manual-therapy-intervention-on-lung-function-in-severe-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease
#14
Carlos Cruz-Montecinos, Diego Godoy-Olave, Felipe A Contreras-Briceño, Paulina Gutiérrez, Rodrigo Torres-Castro, Leandro Miret-Venegas, Roger M Engel
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), accessory respiratory muscles are recruited as a compensatory adaptation to changes in respiratory mechanics. This results in shortening and overactivation of these and other muscles. Manual therapy is increasingly being investigated as a way to alleviate these changes. The aim of this study was to measure the immediate effect on lung function of a soft tissue manual therapy protocol (STMTP) designed to address changes in the accessory respiratory muscles and their associated structures in patients with severe COPD...
2017: International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28260479/peripheral-muscle-strength-indicates-respiratory-function-testing-in-renal-recipients
#15
Gaye Ulubay, Saliha Uyanik, Balam Er Dedekarginoglu, Irem Serifoglu, Elif Kupeli, Serife Savas Bozbas, Siren Sezer, Mehmet Haberal
OBJECTIVES: Muscle wasting occurs in renal recipients due to decreased physical performance, and decreased respiratory muscle strength may occur due to changes in structure and function. Data are scarce regarding the roles of sarcopenia and nutritional status on respiratory muscle function in these patients. Here, we evaluated interactions among peripheral muscle strength, sarcopenia, nutritional parameters, and respiratory muscle function in renal transplant recipients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety-nine patients were prospectively enrolled between September and April 2016 at Baskent University...
February 2017: Experimental and Clinical Transplantation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28255812/is-there-any-benefit-using-low-intensity-inspiratory-and-peripheral-muscle-training-in-heart-failure-a-randomized-clinical-trial
#16
Tatiana Satie Kawauchi, Iracema Ioco Kikuchi Umeda, Lays Magalhães Braga, Antonio de Pádua Mansur, João Manoel Rossi-Neto, Amanda Guerra de Moraes Rego Sousa, Mário Hiroyuki Hirata, Lawrence P Cahalin, Naomi Kondo Nakagawa
BACKGROUND: Inspiratory and peripheral muscle training improves muscle strength, exercise tolerance, and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). However, studies investigating different workloads for these exercise modalities are still lacking. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of low and moderate intensities on muscle strength, functional capacity, and quality of life. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with stable HF (aged >18 years, NYHA II/III, LVEF <40%) were randomized to: non-exercise control group (n = 9), low-intensity training group (LIPRT, n = 13, 15% maximal inspiratory workload, and 0...
March 2, 2017: Clinical Research in Cardiology: Official Journal of the German Cardiac Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28255086/mechanisms-of-the-deep-slow-wave-sleep-related-increase-of-upper-airway-muscle-tone-in-healthy-humans
#17
Amelia Hicks, Jennifer M Cori, Amy S Jordan, Christian L Nicholas, Leszek Kubin, John G Semmler, Atul Malhotra, David Gerard Peter McSharry, John A Trinder
Upper airway muscle activity is reportedly elevated during slow-wave sleep (SWS) when compared to lighter sleep stages. To uncover the possible mechanisms underlying this elevation, we explored the correlation between different indices of central and reflex inspiratory drive, such as the changes in airway pressure and end-expiratory CO2, and the changes in the genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) muscle activity accompanying transitions from the lighter N2 to the deeper N3 stage of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in healthy young adult men...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28255085/effects-of-inspiratory-muscle-training-on-respiratory-muscle-electromyography-and-dyspnea-during-exercise-in-healthy-men
#18
Andrew H Ramsook, Yannick Molgat-Seon, Michele R Schaeffer, Sabrina S Wilkie, Pat G Camp, W Darlene Reid, Lee M Romer, Jordan A Guenette
Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has consistently been shown to reduce exertional dyspnea in health and disease; however, the physiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. A growing body of literature suggests that dyspnea intensity can largely be explained by an awareness of increased neural respiratory drive, as indirectly measured using diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi). Accordingly, we sought to determine if improvements in dyspnea following IMT can be explained by decreases in inspiratory muscle EMG activity...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28250153/microinjection-of-kynurenic-acid-in-the-rostral-nucleus-of-the-tractus-solitarius-disrupts-spatiotemporal-aspects-of-mechanically-induced-tracheobronchial-cough
#19
Ivan Poliacek, Teresa Pitts, Melanie J Rose, Paul W Davenport, Michal Simera, Marcel Veternik, Zuzana Kotmanova, Donald C Bolser
The importance of neurons in the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) in the production of coughing was tested by microinjections of the non-specific glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (kyn; 100 mM in artificial cerebrospinal fluid) in 15 adult spontaneously breathing anesthetized cats. Repetitive coughing was elicited by mechanical stimulation of the intrathoracic airway. Electromyograms (EMG) were recorded from inspiratory parasternal and expiratory transversus abdominis muscles (ABD). Bilateral microinjections of kyn into the NTS rostral to obex (55±4 nl total in two locations; n=6 or 110±4 nl total in four locations; n=5), primarily the ventrolateral subnucleus, reduced cough number and expiratory cough efforts (amplitudes of ABD EMG and maxima of esophageal pressure) compared to control...
March 1, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28237936/onset-and-offset-estimation-of-the-neural-inspiratory-time-in-surface-diaphragm-electromyography-a-pilot-study-in-healthy-subjects
#20
Luis Estrada, Abel Torres-Cebrian, Leonardo Sarlabous, Raimon Jane
This study evaluates the onset and offset of neural inspiratory time estimated from surface diaphragm electromyographic (EMGdi) recordings. EMGdi and airflow signals were recorded in ten healthy subjects according to two respiratory protocols based on respiratory rate (RR) increments, from 15 to 40 breaths per minute (bpm), and fractional inspiratory time (Ti/Ttot) decrements, from 0.54 to 0.18. The analysis of diaphragm electromyographic (EMGdi) signal amplitude is an alternative approach for the quantification of neural respiratory drive (NRD)...
February 22, 2017: IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics
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