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Acute mountain sickness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29202898/isolated-psychosis-during-exposure-to-very-high-and-extreme-altitude-characterisation-of-a-new-medical-entity
#1
Katharina Hüfner, Hermann Brugger, Eva Kuster, Franziska Dünsser, Agnieszka E Stawinoga, Rachel Turner, Iztok Tomazin, Barbara Sperner-Unterweger
BACKGROUND: Psychotic episodes during exposure to very high or extreme altitude have been frequently reported in mountain literature, but not systematically analysed and acknowledged as a distinct clinical entity. METHODS: Episodes reported above 3500 m altitude with possible psychosis were collected from the lay literature and provide the basis for this observational study. Dimensional criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were used for psychosis, and the Lake Louise Scoring criteria for acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral oedema (HACE)...
December 5, 2017: Psychological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29172727/objective-versus-self-reported-sleep-quality-at-high-altitude
#2
Paul J Anderson, Christina M Wood-Wentz, Kent R Bailey, Bruce D Johnson
Anderson, Paul J., Christina M. Wood-Wentz, Kent R. Bailey, and Bruce D. Johnson. Objective versus self-reported sleep quality at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2017. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found little relationship between polysomnography and a diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS) using the Lake Louise Symptom Questionnaire (LLSQ). The correlation between sleep question responses on the LLSQ and polysomnography results has not been explored. We compared LLSQ sleep responses and polysomnography data from our previous study of workers rapidly transported to the South Pole...
November 27, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29166795/pharmacological-interventions-for-preventing-acute-mountain-sickness-a-network-meta-analysis-and-trial-sequential-analysis-of-randomized-clinical-trials
#3
Kannan Sridharan, Gowri Sivaramakrishnan
BACKGROUND: Individuals ascending to high altitude are at a risk of getting acute mountain sickness (AMS). The present study is a network meta-analysis comparing all the interventions available to prevent AMS. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched for randomized clinical trials evaluating the use of drugs to prevent AMS. Incidence of AMS was the primary outcome and incidence of severe AMS, paraesthesia (as side effect of acetazolamide use), headache and severe headache, and oxygen saturation were the secondary outcomes...
November 23, 2017: Annals of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153259/reduction-of-olfactory-sensitivity-during-normobaric-hypoxia
#4
Tilman Huppertz, Jessica Freiherr, Bernhard Olzowy, Ulrich Kisser, Jutta Stephan, Gunther Fesl, Kathrin Haegler, Berend Feddersen, Rainald Fischer, Klaus Mees, Sven Becker
OBJECTIVE: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is caused by a low partial pressure of oxygen and may occur above 2500m. The aim of this research was to evaluate olfactory and gustatory abilities of healthy subjects during baseline conditions and after seven hours of normobaric hypoxia. METHODS: Sixteen healthy subjects were assessed using the Sniffin' Sticks, as well as intensity and pleasantness ratings. Gustatory function was evaluated utilizing the Taste Strips. Experiments were carried out under baseline conditions (518m altitude) followed by a second testing session after seven hours of normobaric hypoxia exposure (comparable to 4000m altitude)...
November 15, 2017: Auris, Nasus, Larynx
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29136449/does-this-patient-have-acute-mountain-sickness-the-rational-clinical-examination-systematic-review
#5
REVIEW
David Meier, Tinh-Hai Collet, Isabella Locatelli, Jacques Cornuz, Bengt Kayser, David L Simel, Claudio Sartori
Importance: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) affects more than 25% of individuals ascending to 3500 m (11 500 ft) and more than 50% of those above 6000 m (19 700 ft). AMS may progress from nonspecific symptoms to life-threatening high-altitude cerebral edema in less than 1% of patients. It is not clear how to best diagnose AMS. Objective: To systematically review studies assessing the accuracy of AMS diagnostic instruments, including the visual analog scale (VAS) score, which quantifies the overall feeling of sickness at altitude (VAS[O]; various thresholds), Acute Mountain Sickness-Cerebral score (AMS-C; ≥0...
November 14, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29136446/acute-mountain-sickness
#6
Jill Jin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 14, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29074708/wearable-physiologic-sensors-and-real-time-algorithms-for-detection-of-acute-mountain-sickness
#7
Stephen R Muza
This is a mini-review of potential wearable physiological sensors and algorithms (process and equations) for detection of acute mountain sickness (AMS). Given the emerging status of this effort, the focus of the review is on the current clinical assessment of AMS, known risk factors (environmental, demographic and physiological), and current understanding of AMS pathophysiology. Studies that have examined a range of physiological variables to develop AMS prediction and/or detection algorithms are reviewed to provide insight and potential technological roadmaps for future development of real-time physiological sensors and algorithms to detect AMS...
October 26, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29042272/effects-of-dietary-nitrate-on-respiratory-physiology-at-high-altitude-results-from-the-xtreme-alps-study
#8
Andrew F Cumpstey, Philip J Hennis, Edward T Gilbert-Kawai, Bernadette O Fernandez, Matthieu Poudevigne, Alexandra Cobb, Paula Meale, Kay Mitchell, Helen Moyses, Helmut Pöhnl, Monty G Mythen, Michael P W Grocott, Martin Feelisch, Daniel S Martin
Nitric oxide (NO) production plays a central role in conferring tolerance to hypoxia. Tibetan highlanders, successful high-altitude dwellers for millennia, have higher circulating nitrate and exhaled NO (ENO) levels than native lowlanders. Since nitrate itself can reduce the oxygen cost of exercise in normoxia it may confer additional benefits at high altitude. Xtreme Alps was a double-blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial to investigate how dietary nitrate supplementation affects physiological responses to hypoxia in 28 healthy adult volunteers resident at 4559 m for 1 week; 14 receiving a beetroot-based high-nitrate supplement and 14 receiving a low-nitrate 'placebo' of matching appearance/taste...
December 1, 2017: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29021909/managing-diabetes-at-high-altitude-personal-experience-with-support-from-a-multidisciplinary-physical-activity-and-diabetes-clinic
#9
Gary Malcolm, Sian Rilstone, Sivasujan Sivasubramaniyam, Carol Jairam, Stephen Chew, Nick Oliver, Neil E Hill
OBJECTIVE: Physical activity is important for well-being but can be challenging for people with diabetes. Data informing support of specialist activities such as climbing and high-altitude trekking are limited. A 42-year-old man with type 1 diabetes (duration 30 years) attended a Multidisciplinary Physical Activity and Diabetes Clinic planning to climb Mont Blanc during the summer and trek to Everest Base Camp in the autumn. His aims were to complete these adventures without his diabetes impacting on their success...
2017: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28949829/performance-mood-and-anxiety-during-a-climb-of-mount-everest
#10
Heikki M Karinen, Martti T Tuomisto
Karinen, Heikki M., and Martti T. Tuomisto. Performance, mood, and anxiety during a climb of Mount Everest. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2017. BACKGROUND: Various studies have shown the deleterious effects of high-altitude hypoxia on visual, motor, somatosensory, cognitive, and emotional function and also in intelligence tests, reaction time, speech comprehension, hand steadiness, visual contrast discrimination, and word association tests. Because optimal cognitive abilities may be crucial for mountain climbers' safety, this study was intended to evaluate the changes in cognitive performance, mood, and anxiety during an Everest expedition lasting almost 3 months...
September 26, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28890440/inhaled-budesonide-for-acute-mountain-sickness
#11
EDITORIAL
Robert Naeije, Erik R Swenson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: European Respiratory Journal: Official Journal of the European Society for Clinical Respiratory Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28870508/inappropriate-dexamethasone-use-by-a-trekker-in-nepal-a-case-report
#12
Nicholas R Haslam, Rachel Garth, Nicola Kelly
We present a case of inappropriate dexamethasone use in a trekker in the Everest region of Nepal. We aim to increase awareness among health professionals of the possible use of this medication by trekkers and promote knowledge of potential complications. In this case, a previously altitude-naive trekker was prescribed prophylactic dexamethasone by physicians in a Western travel clinic before high-altitude trekking in Nepal. There were no indications for prophylactic medication nor for the use of dexamethasone...
September 1, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28832689/incidence-and-severity-of-acute-mountain-sickness-and-associated-symptoms-in-children-trekking-on-xue-mountain-taiwan
#13
Fei-Ying Cheng, Mei-Jy Jeng, Yin-Chou Lin, Shih-Hao Wang, Shih-Hao Wu, Wen-Cheng Li, Kuo-Feng Huang, Te-Fa Chiu
BACKGROUND: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) occurs in non-acclimatized people after an acute ascent to an altitude of 2,500 m or higher. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and severity of AMS and associated symptoms in children. METHODS: The prospective observational study included 197 healthy, non-acclimatized 11 and 12-year-old children trekking the round-trip from the trailhead to the summit of Xue Mountain, Taiwan (2,179 m to 3,886 m) over 3 days...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28810235/obesity-as-a-conditioning-factor-for-high-altitude-diseases
#14
Rocío San Martin, Julio Brito, Patricia Siques, Fabiola León-Velarde
Obesity, a worldwide epidemic, has become a major health burden because it is usually accompanied by an increased risk for insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and even some kinds of cancer. It also results in associated increases in healthcare expenditures and labor and economic consequences. There are also other fields of medicine and biology where obesity or being overweight play a major role, such as high-altitude illnesses (acute mountain sickness, hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and chronic mountain sickness), where an increasing relationship among these two morbid statuses has been demonstrated...
2017: Obesity Facts
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28798201/remote-ischemic-preconditioning-does-not-prevent-acute-mountain-sickness-after-rapid-ascent-to-3450-m
#15
Marc M Berger, Franziska Macholz, Lukas Lehmann, Daniel Dankl, Marcel Hochreiter, Bernhard Bacher, Peter Bärtsch, Heimo Mairbäurl
Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has been shown to protect remote organs, such as the brain and the lung, from damage induced by subsequent hypoxia or ischemia. Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a syndrome of non-specific neurologic symptoms and in high altitude pulmonary edema excessive hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) plays a pivotal role. We hypothesized that RIPC protects the brain from AMS and attenuates the magnitude of HPV after rapid ascent to 3450 m. Forty non-acclimatized volunteers were randomized into 2 groups...
August 10, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28781177/impact-of-a-newly-constructed-motor-vehicle-road-on-altitude-illness-in-the-nepal-himalayas
#16
Jonathan Reisman, Dinesh Deonarain, Buddha Basnyat
OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the impact that motor vehicle travel along a newly constructed road has on altitude illness (including acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral edema, and high-altitude pulmonary edema). The new road from Besisahar (760 m) to Manang (3540 m) in Nepal was completed in December 2014. METHODS: We enrolled all patients diagnosed with altitude illness at the Himalayan Rescue Association Manang clinic in fall 2016. Phi coefficients were calculated to test for an association between Nepali ethnicity and rapid ascent by motor vehicle...
August 3, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28731986/the-effect-of-sex-on-heart-rate-variability-at-high-altitude
#17
Christopher John Boos, Emma Vincent, Adrian Mellor, John O'Hara, Caroline Newman, Richard Cruttenden, Phylip Scott, Mark Cooke, Jamie Matu, David Richard Woods
There is evidence suggesting that high altitude (HA) exposure leads to a fall in heart rate variability (HRV) that is linked to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). The effects of sex on changes in HRV at HA and its relationship to AMS are unknown. METHODS: HRV (5-min single-lead ECG) was measured in 63 healthy adults (41 men and 22 women) 18-56 yr of age at sea level (SL) and during a HA trek at 3619, 4600, and 5140 m, respectively. The main effects of altitude (SL, 3619 m, 4600 m, and 5140 m) and sex (men vs women) and their potential interaction were assessed using a factorial repeated-measures ANOVA...
December 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28716290/yarsagumba-fungus-health-problems-in-the-himalayan-gold-rush
#18
Pranawa Koirala, Bidur Pandit, Pratibha Phuyal, Ken Zafren
INTRODUCTION: Seasonal migration of people in search of Yarsagumba fungus creates a population of collectors that faces hardship and health risks in austere high-altitude settings. METHODS: In 2016, our 4-person team performed a 2-day health-needs survey of people collecting Yarsagumba fungus near the village of Yak Kharka (4020 m) in the Manang District of Nepal. RESULTS: There were approximately 800 people, both male and female, from age 10 to over 60, collecting Yarsagumba fungus...
July 14, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28705998/is-normobaric-hypoxia-an-effective-treatment-for-sustaining-previously-acquired-altitude-acclimatization
#19
Beth A Beidleman, Charles S Fulco, Bruce S Cadarette, Allen Cymerman, Mark J Buller, Roy M Salgado, Alexander M Posch, Janet E Staab, Ingrid V Sils, Beau R Yurkevicius, Adam J Luippold, Alexander P Welles, Stephen R Muza
This study examined whether normobaric hypoxia (NH) treatment is more efficacious for sustaining high altitude (HA) acclimatization during re-introduction to altitude (RA) than no treatment at all. Seventeen sea level (SL) residents (age=23±6yrs; mean±SE) completed in the following order: 1)4d of SL testing, 2)12d of high altitude (HA) acclimatization at 4300m, 3)12d at SL post HA acclimatization (Post) where each received either NH (n=9;FiO2=0.122) or Sham (n=8;FiO2=0.207) treatment, and 4)24-h re-introduction to 4300m altitude (RA) in a hypobaric chamber...
July 13, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28705997/evidence-from-high-altitude-acclimatization-for-an-integrated-cerebrovascular-and-ventilatory-hypercapnic-response-but-different-responses-to-hypoxia
#20
Zachary M Smith, Erin Krizay, Rui Carlos Sa, Ethan T Li, Miriam Scadeng, Frank L Powell, David J Dubowitz
Ventilation and cerebral blood flow (CBF) are both sensitive to hypoxia and hypercapnia. To compare chemosensitivity in these two systems, we made simultaneous measurements of ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in 35 normal human subjects before and after acclimatization to hypoxia. Ventilation and CBF were measured during stepwise changes in isocapnic hypoxia and iso-oxic hypercapnia. We used MRI to quantify actual cerebral perfusion. Measurements were repeated after 2-days of acclimatization to hypoxia at 3,800m altitude (PiO2 = 90 Torr) to compare plasticity in the chemosensitivity of these two systems...
July 13, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
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