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Acute mountain sickness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28418725/medex-2015-heart-rate-variability-predicts-development-of-acute-mountain-sickness
#1
Angus Sutherland, Joseph Freer, Laura Evans, Alberto Dolci, Matteo Crotti, Jamie Hugo Macdonald
Sutherland, Angus, Joseph Freer, Laura Evans, Alberto Dolci, Matteo Crotti, and Jamie Hugo Macdonald. MEDEX 2015: Heart rate variability predicts development of acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2017. AIMS: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) develops when the body fails to acclimatize to atmospheric changes at altitude. Preascent prediction of susceptibility to AMS would be a useful tool to prevent subsequent harm. Changes to peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) on hypoxic exposure have previously been shown to be of poor predictive value...
April 18, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411926/advances-in-the-prevention-and-treatment-of-high-altitude-illness
#2
REVIEW
Christopher Davis, Peter Hackett
High altitude illness encompasses a spectrum of clinical entities to include: acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These illnesses occur as a result of a hypobaric hypoxic environment. Although a mild case of acute mountain sickness may be self-limited, high altitude cerebral edema and high altitude pulmonary edema represent critical emergencies that require timely intervention. This article reviews recent advances in the prevention and treatment of high altitude illness, including new pharmacologic strategies for prophylaxis and revised treatment guidelines...
May 2017: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28407652/smartphone-enabled-heart-rate-variability-and-acute-mountain-sickness
#3
Adrian Mellor, Josh Bakker-Dyos, John OʼHara, David Richard Woods, David A Holdsworth, Christopher J Boos
INTRODUCTION: The autonomic system and sympathetic activation appears integral in the pathogenesis of acute mountain sickness (AMS) at high altitude (HA), yet a link between heart rate variability (HRV) and AMS has not been convincingly shown. In this study we investigated the utility of the smartphone-derived HRV score to predict and diagnose AMS at HA. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy adults were investigated at baseline at 1400 m and over 10 days during a trek to 5140 m...
April 12, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398844/breathlessness-at-high-altitude-first-episode-of-bronchoconstriction-in-an-otherwise-healthy-sojourner
#4
Sanjeeb Sudarshan Bhandari, Pranawa Koirala, Sadichhya Lohani, Pratibha Phuyal, Buddha Basnyat
Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan, Pranawa Koirala, Sadichhya Lohani, Pratibha Phuyal, and Buddha Basnyat. Breathlessness at high altitude: first episode of bronchoconstriction in an otherwise healthy sojourner. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2017-High-altitude illness is a collective term for less severe acute mountain sickness and more severe high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high-altitude cerebral edema, which we can experience while traveling to high altitude. These get better when we get down to the lower altitudes...
February 21, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28396299/plasma-cytokine-profiling-to-predict-susceptibility-to-acute-mountain-sickness
#5
Hui Lu, Rong Wang, Wenbin Li, Hua Xie, Chang Wang, Ying Hao, Yuhuan Sun, Zhengping Jia
Extensive studies have been performed on acute mountain sickness (AMS), but biomarkers predicting AMS are lacking. Presently, the mainstay methods to identify AMS biomarkers include proteomic and genetic methods at high altitudes or in hypoxic simulated chambers. In the present study, we compared plasma cytokine profiles between AMS-susceptible individuals and AMS-resistant individuals at low altitude by cytokine array analysis. In total, 75 differentially expressed cytokines were identified between AMS-susceptible individuals and AMS-resistant individuals, most involved in inflammation...
November 1, 2016: European Cytokine Network
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28394182/medex2015-greater-sea-level-fitness-is-associated-with-lower-sense-of-effort-during-himalayan-trekking-without-worse-acute-mountain-sickness
#6
Gabriella M K Rossetti, Jamie H Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K Newcombe, Heather M Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, Samuel J Oliver
Rossetti, Gabriella M.K., Jamie H. Macdonald, Matthew Smith, Anna R. Jackson, Nigel Callender, Hannah K. Newcombe, Heather M. Storey, Sebastian Willis, Jojanneke van den Beukel, Jonathan Woodward, James Pollard, Benjamin Wood, Victoria Newton, Jana Virian, Owen Haswell, and Samuel J. Oliver. MEDEX2015: Greater sea-level fitness is associated with lower sense of effort during Himalayan trekking without worse acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2017.-This study examined the complex relationships of fitness and hypoxic sensitivity with submaximal exercise responses and acute mountain sickness (AMS) at altitude...
April 10, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333563/effect-of-high-altitude-exposure-on-intraocular-pressure-using-goldmann-applanation-tonometry
#7
Gabriel Willmann, Kai Schommer, Maximilian Schultheiss, M Dominik Fischer, Karl-Ulrich Bartz-Schmidt, Florian Gekeler, Andreas Schatz
Willmann, Gabriel, Kai Schommer, Maximilian Schultheiss, M. Dominik Fischer, Karl-Ulrich Bartz-Schmidt, Florian Gekeler, and Andreas Schatz. Effect of high altitude exposure on intraocular pressure using Goldmann applanation tonometry. High Alt Med Biol. 00:000-000, 2017. AIMS: The aim of the study was to quantify changes of intraocular pressure (IOP) during exposure to 4559 m using the state-of-the-art method of Goldmann applanation tonometry for IOP measurement and to detect correlations between IOP and acute mountain sickness (AMS) in a prospective manner...
March 23, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28329216/heart-mechanics-at-high-altitude-6%C3%A2-days-on-the-top-of-europe
#8
Claire Maufrais, Thomas Rupp, Pierre Bouzat, Gregory Doucende, Samuel Verges, Stéphane Nottin, Guillaume Walther
Aims: The aim of this study was to analyse the underlying mechanisms of left and right ventricular (LV and RV) functional alterations during several days in high-altitude hypoxia. Methods and results: Resting evaluations of LV and RV function and mechanics were assessed by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography on 11 subjects at sea level (SLPRE), 3 ± 2 h after helicopter transport to high altitude (D0), at day 2 (D2), day 4 (D4) and day 6 (D6) at 4350 m and 5 ± 2 h after return to sea level (SLPOST)...
December 22, 2016: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326844/oxidative-stress-in-acute-hypobaric-hypoxia
#9
Sebastián Irarrázaval, Claudio Allard, Juan Campodónico, Druso Pérez, Pablo Strobel, Luis Vásquez, Inés Urquiaga, Guadalupe Echeverría, Federico Leighton
Irarrázaval, Sebastián, Claudio Allard, Juan Campodónico, Druso Pérez, Pablo Strobel, Luis Vásquez, Inés Urquiaga, Guadalupe Echeverría, and Federico Leighton. Oxidative stress in acute hypobaric hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 00:000-000, 2017.-The effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia endured by mountaineers were studied, specifically as evidenced by acute mountain sickness (AMS) and oxidative stress damage. Ten male volunteers were exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia, and AMS was evaluated through arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), cardiac rate, and the Lake Louise Score (LLS)...
March 22, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323589/preventing-high-altitude-cerebral-edema-in-rats-with-repurposed-anti-angiogenesis-pharmacotherapy
#10
Samantha Tarshis, Joanne Maltzahn, Zoe Loomis, David C Irwin
BACKGROUND: High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a fulminant, deadly, and yet still unpredictable brain disease. A new prophylactic treatment for HACE and its predecessor, acute mountain sickness (AMS), needs to be developed without the contraindications or adverse effect profiles of acetazolamide and dexamethasone. Since neovascularization signals are likely key contributors to HACE/AMS, our approach was to examine already existing anti-angiogenic drugs to inhibit potential initiating HACE pathway(s)...
December 1, 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28285976/high-altitude-illness-in-pilgrims-after-rapid-ascent-to-4380%C3%A2-m
#11
Ken Zafren, Matiram Pun, Nirajan Regmi, Gobinda Bashyal, Bhuwan Acharya, Subarna Gautam, Sujan Jamarkattel, Shankar Raj Lamichhane, Suman Acharya, Buddha Basnyat
BACKGROUND: The goal of the study was to characterize high altitude illness in Nepali pilgrims. METHODS: We kept standardized records at the Himalayan Rescue Association (HRA) Temporary Health Camp at Gosainkund Lake (4380 m) in the Nepal Himalaya during the annual Janai Purnima Festival in 2014. Records included rate of ascent and Lake Louise Score (LLS). We defined High Altitude Headache (HAH) as headache alone or LLS = 2. Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) was LLS≥3...
March 9, 2017: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251400/effects-of-rapid-ascent-on-the-heart-rate-variability-of-individuals-with-and-without-acute-mountain-sickness
#12
Ming Ling Yih, Fang-Chi Lin, Heng-Sheng Chao, Han-Chen Tsai, Shi-Chuan Chang
PURPOSE: Through time- and frequency-domain analysis, we compared the effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia on the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) following night sleeping and morning awakening in individuals with and without acute mountain sickness (AMS). METHOD: Thirty-nine nonacclimatised healthy individuals were transported by bus from sea level to 3150 m within 3 h. Short-term HRV was measured two times a day-before sleeping (BS) and after awakening (AA)- at 3 days before ascent (T0), two consecutive nights at 3150 m (T1 and T2), and 2 days after descent (T3)...
March 1, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28243206/spo2-and-heart-rate-during-a-real-hike-at-altitude-are-significantly-different-than-at-its-simulation-in-normobaric-hypoxia
#13
Nikolaus C Netzer, Linda Rausch, Arn H Eliasson, Hannes Gatterer, Matthias Friess, Martin Burtscher, Stephan Pramsohler
Rationale: Exposures to simulated altitude (normobaric hypoxia, NH) are frequently used in preparation for mountaineering activities at real altitude (hypobaric hypoxia, HH). However, physiological responses to exercise in NH and HH may differ. Unfortunately clinically useful information on such differences is largely lacking. This study therefore compared exercise responses between a simulated hike on a treadmill in NH and a similar field hike in HH. Methods: Six subjects (four men) participated in two trials, one in a NH chamber and a second in HH at an altitude of 4,205 m on the mountain Mauna Kea...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240265/a-longitudinal-study-of-cerebral-blood-flow-under-hypoxia-at-high-altitude-using-3d-pseudo-continuous-arterial-spin-labeling
#14
Wenjia Liu, Jie Liu, Xin Lou, Dandan Zheng, Bing Wu, Danny J J Wang, Lin Ma
Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) may occur with acute exposure to high altitude; however, the CBF of the brain parenchyma has not been studied to date. In this study, identical magnetic resonance scans using arterial spin labeling (ASL) were performed to study the haemodynamic changes at both sea level and high altitude. We found that with acute exposure to high altitude, the CBF in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subjects was higher (P < 0.05), while the CBF of non-AMS subjects was lower (P > 0...
February 27, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28228730/a-signature-of-circulating-micrornas-predicts-the-susceptibility-of-acute-mountain-sickness
#15
Bao Liu, He Huang, Gang Wu, Gang Xu, Bing-Da Sun, Er-Long Zhang, Jian Chen, Yu-Qi Gao
Background: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common disabling condition in individuals experiencing high altitudes, which may progress to life-threatening high altitude cerebral edema. Today, no established biomarkers are available for prediction the susceptibility of AMS. MicroRNAs emerge as promising sensitive and specific biomarkers for a variety of diseases. Thus, we sought to identify circulating microRNAs suitable for prediction the susceptible of AMS before exposure to high altitude. Methods: We enrolled 109 healthy man adults and collected blood samples before their exposure to high altitude...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216727/high-altitude-dermatology
#16
Lt Col G K Singh
Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs) and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA) every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV) light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists...
January 2017: Indian Journal of Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28149514/acute-mountain-sickness-amongst-tourists-to-lhasa
#17
Gaurav Sikri, Srinivasa Bhattachar
Acute mountain sickness is the commonest acute high altitude illness occurring at high altitude. Its prevalence is dependent on the ascent rate, altitude achieved, physical effort required to reach the target altitude and pharmacological intervention undertaken by the tourists visiting high altitude areas. This Letter to the Editor is an endeavour to re-emphasise the importance of all these factors affecting the prevalence of acute mountain sickness.
2017: Archives of Public Health, Archives Belges de Santé Publique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28143879/acute-high-altitude-sickness
#18
Andrew M Luks, Erik R Swenson, Peter Bärtsch
At any point 1-5 days following ascent to altitudes ≥2500 m, individuals are at risk of developing one of three forms of acute altitude illness: acute mountain sickness, a syndrome of nonspecific symptoms including headache, lassitude, dizziness and nausea; high-altitude cerebral oedema, a potentially fatal illness characterised by ataxia, decreased consciousness and characteristic changes on magnetic resonance imaging; and high-altitude pulmonary oedema, a noncardiogenic form of pulmonary oedema resulting from excessive hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction which can be fatal if not recognised and treated promptly...
January 2017: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28069461/is-acute-mountain-sickness-related-to-trait-anxiety-a-normobaric-chamber-study
#19
Martin Niedermeier, Robb Waanders, Verena Menz, Maria Wille, Martin Kopp, Martin Burtscher
INTRODUCTION: Some mountaineers are more prone to the occurrence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) than others. State anxiety during altitude exposure might be associated with AMS development. We hypothesized that trait anxiety might be higher in AMS cases compared to non-AMS cases. The aim of the present study was to study the relationship between AMS development and trait anxiety. METHODS: In an observational study design, AMS incidence during a 12-hour exposure to normobaric hypoxia (FiO2=12...
January 6, 2017: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063399/sleep-quality-among-elderly-high-altitude-dwellers-in-ladakh
#20
Ryota Sakamoto, Kiyohito Okumiya, Tsering Norboo, Norboo Tsering, Takayoshi Yamaguchi, Mitsuhiro Nose, Shinya Takeda, Toshihiro Tsukihara, Motonao Ishikawa, Shun Nakajima, Taizo Wada, Michiko Fujisawa, Hissei Imai, Yasuko Ishimoto, Yumi Kimura, Eriko Fukutomi, Wenling Chen, Kuniaki Otsuka, Kozo Matsubayashi
It has been already known that people who temporarily stay at high altitude may develop insomnia as a symptom of acute mountain sickness. However, much less is known about people living at high altitude. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high altitude environment on sleep quality for the elderly who have been living at high altitude for their whole lives. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Domkhar valley at altitudes of 2800-4200m, Ladakh. Sleep quality was assessed using Insomnia Severity Index (ISI)...
March 2017: Psychiatry Research
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