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Acute mountain sickness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625625/association-of-egln1-genetic-polymorphisms-with-spo-2-responses-to-acute-hypobaric-hypoxia-in-a-japanese-cohort
#1
Yoshiki Yasukochi, Takayuki Nishimura, Midori Motoi, Shigeki Watanuki
BACKGROUND: Recent studies have explored various genetic and physiological factors related to high-altitude adaptation in highlander populations. However, the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), influencing such adaptation, on physiological responses to hypobaric hypoxia have not been examined in lowlanders with lowlander ancestry. Thus, we aimed to investigate the association between SNPs around the EGLN1 genomic region, possibly involved in high-altitude adaptation, and physiological changes to hypobaric hypoxia exposure in a cohort of Japanese lowlanders...
April 6, 2018: Journal of Physiological Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29623044/long-term-intermittent-work-at-high-altitude-right-heart-functional-and-morphological-status-and-associated-cardiometabolic-factors
#2
Julio Brito, Patricia Siques, Rosario López, Raul Romero, Fabiola León-Velarde, Karen Flores, Nicole Lüneburg, Juliane Hannemann, Rainer H Böger
Background: Living at high altitude or with chronic hypoxia implies functional and morphological changes in the right ventricle and pulmonary vasculature with a 10% prevalence of high-altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH). The implications of working intermittently (day shifts) at high altitude (hypobaric hypoxia) over the long term are still not well-defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the right cardiac circuit status along with potentially contributory metabolic variables and distinctive responses after long exposure to the latter condition...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29615930/arachidonic-acid-metabolism-pathway-is-not-only-dominant-in-metabolic-modulation-but-associated-with-phenotypic-variation-after-acute-hypoxia-exposure
#3
Chang Liu, Bao Liu, Lu Liu, Er-Long Zhang, Bind-da Sun, Gang Xu, Jian Chen, Yu-Qi Gao
Background: The modulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism pathway is identified in metabolic alterations after hypoxia exposure, but its biological function is controversial. We aimed at integrating plasma metabolomic and transcriptomic approaches to systematically explore the roles of the AA metabolism pathway in response to acute hypoxia using an acute mountain sickness (AMS) model. Methods: Blood samples were obtained from 53 enrolled subjects before and after exposure to high altitude. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and RNA sequencing were separately performed for metabolomic and transcriptomic profiling, respectively...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29614518/hypobaric-hypoxia-causes-elevated-thrombin-generation-mediated-by-fviii-that-is-balanced-by-decreased-platelet-activation
#4
Cécile H Kicken, Marisa Ninivaggi, Joke Konings, Martijn Moorlag, Dana Huskens, Jasper A Remijn, Saartje Bloemen, Marcus D Lancé, Bas De Laat
INTRODUCTION:  Epidemiological studies suggest that hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude poses a risk for developing venous thromboembolism. The cause of this observed hypercoagulability remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of hypobaric hypoxia at 3,883 m above sea level on thrombin generation and platelet activation. METHODS:  After complying with medical ethical procedures, 18 participants were recruited, of whom 1 had to leave the study prematurely due to mild acute mountain sickness...
April 3, 2018: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29608374/exploration-of-acute-phase-proteins-and-inflammatory-cytokines-in-early-stage-diagnosis-of-acute-mountain-sickness
#5
Chi Wang, Hui Jiang, Jinyan Duan, Jingwen Chen, Qi Wang, Xiaoting Liu, Chengbin Wang
Wang, Chi, Hui Jiang, Jinyan Duan, Jingwen Chen, Qi Wang, Xiaoting Liu, and Chengbin Wang. Exploration of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines in early stage diagnosis of acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol. 00: 000-000, 2018. BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS) is currently based on personal appreciation of the severity of symptoms. A more objective method to diagnose AMS is required. Inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins have been reported to be different at high altitude...
April 2, 2018: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29596018/the-star-data-reporting-guidelines-for-clinical-high-altitude-research
#6
Monika Brodmann Maeder, Hermann Brugger, Matiram Pun, Giacomo Strapazzon, Tomas Dal Cappello, Marco Maggiorini, Peter Hackett, Peter Bärtsch, Erik R Swenson, Ken Zafren
Brodmann Maeder, Monika, Hermann Brugger, Matiram Pun, Giacomo Strapazzon, Tomas Dal Cappello, Marco Maggiorini, Peter Hackett, Peter Baärtsch, Erik R. Swenson, Ken Zafren (STAR Core Group), and the STAR Delphi Expert Group. The STARdata reporting guidelines for clinical high altitude research. High AltMedBiol. 19:7-14, 2018. AIMS: The goal of the STAR (STrengthening Altitude Research) initiative was to produce a uniform set of key elements for research and reporting in clinical high-altitude (HA) medicine...
March 2018: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29587872/sequencing-the-exons-of-human-glucocorticoid-receptor-nr3c1-gene-in-han-chinese-with-high-altitude-pulmonary-edema
#7
Hui Du, Jing Zhao, Zhanhai Su, Yongnian Liu, Yingzhong Yang
BACKGROUND: High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a serious acute mountain sickness that mainly occurs in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The precise etiology of HAPE remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether NR3C1 gene polymorphism is associated with the susceptibility to HAPE. METHODS: The exons of NR3C1 gene were sequenced by a ABI 3730 DNA analyzer in 133 HAPE patients and matched 135 healthy Han Chinese controls from the Yushu area in Qinghai (the altitude greater than 3500 m)...
March 27, 2018: Journal of Physiological Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29583031/the-2018-lake-louise-acute-mountain-sickness-score
#8
Robert C Roach, Peter H Hackett, Oswald Oelz, Peter Bärtsch, Andrew M Luks, Martin J MacInnis, J Kenneth Baillie
Roach, Robert C., Peter H. Hackett, Oswald Oelz, Peter Bärtsch, Andrew M. Luks, Martin J. MacInnis, J. Kenneth Baillie, and The Lake Louise AMS Score Consensus Committee. The 2018 Lake Louise Acute Mountain Sickness Score. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2018.- The Lake Louise Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) scoring system has been a useful research tool since first published in 1991. Recent studies have shown that disturbed sleep at altitude, one of the five symptoms scored for AMS, is more likely due to altitude hypoxia per se, and is not closely related to AMS...
March 13, 2018: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29536370/hypoxia-induced-lowered-executive-function-depends-on-arterial-oxygen-desaturation
#9
Genta Ochi, Yusuke Kanazawa, Kazuki Hyodo, Kazuya Suwabe, Takeshi Shimizu, Takemune Fukuie, Kyeongho Byun, Hideaki Soya
Although it has been traditionally thought that decreasing SpO2 with ascent to high altitudes not only induces acute mountain sickness but also can decrease executive function, the relationship between decreased SpO2 levels and hypoxia-induced lowered executive function is still unclear. Here we aimed to clarify whether hypoxia-induced lowered executive function was associated with arterial oxygen desaturation, using 21 participants performing the color-word Stroop task under normoxic and three hypoxic conditions (FIO2  = 0...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Physiological Sciences: JPS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29529715/interventions-for-preventing-high-altitude-illness-part-2-less-commonly-used-drugs
#10
REVIEW
Alejandro Gonzalez Garay, Daniel Molano Franco, Víctor H Nieto Estrada, Arturo J Martí-Carvajal, Ingrid Arevalo-Rodriguez
BACKGROUND: High altitude illness (HAI) is a term used to describe a group of mainly cerebral and pulmonary syndromes that can occur during travel to elevations above 2500 metres (˜ 8200 feet). Acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) are reported as potential medical problems associated with high altitude ascent. In this second review, in a series of three about preventive strategies for HAI, we assessed the effectiveness of five of the less commonly used classes of pharmacological interventions...
March 12, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29428576/ganglioside-gm1-protects-against-high-altitude-cerebral-edema-in-rats-by-suppressing-the-oxidative-stress-and-inflammatory-response-via-the-pi3k-akt-nrf2-pathway
#11
Gu Gong, Liang Yin, Libang Yuan, Daming Sui, Yangyang Sun, Haiyu Fu, Liang Chen, Xiaowu Wang
High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a severe type of acute mountain sickness (AMS) that occurs in response to a high altitude hypobaric hypoxic (HH) environment. GM1 monosialoganglioside can alleviate brain injury under adverse conditions including amyloid-β-peptide, ischemia and trauma. However, its role in HACE-induced brain damage remains poorly elucidated. In this study, GM1 supplementation dose-dependently attenuated increase in rat brain water content (BWC) induced by hypobaric chamber (7600 m) exposurefor 24 h...
February 8, 2018: Molecular Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29387446/acetazolamide-reduces-exercise-capacity-following-a-5-day-ascent-to-4559-m-in-a-randomised-study
#12
Arthur R Bradwell, Kimberley Ashdown, Carla Rue, John Delamere, Owen D Thomas, Samuel J E Lucas, Alex D Wright, Stephen J Harris, Stephen D Myers
Objective: To assess whether acetazolamide (Az), used prophylactically for acute mountain sickness (AMS), alters exercise capacity at high altitude. Methods: Az (500 mg daily) or placebo was administered to 20 healthy adults (aged 36±20 years, range 21-77), who were paired for age, sex, AMS susceptibility and weight, in a double-blind, randomised manner. Participants ascended over 5 days to 4559 m, then exercised to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer, while recording breath-by-breath gas measurements...
2018: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29352170/plasma-proteomic-study-of-acute-mountain-sickness-susceptible-and-resistant-individuals
#13
Hui Lu, Rong Wang, Wenbin Li, Hua Xie, Chang Wang, Ying Hao, Yuhuan Sun, Zhengping Jia
Although extensive studies have focused on the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS), the exact mechanisms of AMS are still obscure. In this study, we used isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to identify novel AMS-associated biomarkers in human plasma. After 9 hours of hypobaric hypoxia the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, glycolysis, ribosome, and proteasome were significantly reduced in AMS resistant (AMS-) group, but not in AMS susceptible (AMS+) group...
January 19, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29282538/barometric-pressure-change-and-heart-rate-response-during-sleeping-at-3000-m-altitude
#14
Masahiro Horiuchi, Junko Endo, Yoko Handa, Hiroshi Nose
We investigated effects of change in barometric pressure (P B ) with climate change on heart rate (HR) during sleep at 3000 m altitude. Nineteen healthy adults (15 males and four females; mean age 32 years) participated in this study. We measured P B (barometry) and HR (electrocardiography) every minute during their overnight stay in a mountain lodge at ~ 3000 m. We also measured resting arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) and evaluated symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) by using the Lake Louise Questionnaire at 2305 and 3000 m, respectively...
December 27, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29259975/relationship-between-smoking-and-acute-mountain-sickness-a-meta-analysis-of-observational-studies
#15
REVIEW
Cristina Masuet-Aumatell, Alba Sánchez-Mascuñano, Fernando Agüero Santangelo, Sergio Morchón Ramos, Josep Maria Ramon-Torrell
Aims: Previous epidemiological investigations of the relationship between smoking and acute mountain sickness (AMS) risk yielded inconsistent findings. Therefore, a meta-analysis of observational studies was performed to determine whether smoking is related to the development of AMS. Methods: Searches were performed on PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science for relevant studies that were published before November 2016 reporting smoking prevalence and AMS. Two evaluators independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed study quality...
2017: BioMed Research International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29202898/isolated-psychosis-during-exposure-to-very-high-and-extreme-altitude-characterisation-of-a-new-medical-entity
#16
Katharina Hüfner, Hermann Brugger, Eva Kuster, Franziska Dünsser, Agnieszka E Stawinoga, Rachel Turner, Iztok Tomazin, Barbara Sperner-Unterweger
BACKGROUND: Psychotic episodes during exposure to very high or extreme altitude have been frequently reported in mountain literature, but not systematically analysed and acknowledged as a distinct clinical entity. METHODS: Episodes reported above 3500 m altitude with possible psychosis were collected from the lay literature and provide the basis for this observational study. Dimensional criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were used for psychosis, and the Lake Louise Scoring criteria for acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral oedema (HACE)...
December 5, 2017: Psychological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29172727/objective-versus-self-reported-sleep-quality-at-high-altitude
#17
Paul J Anderson, Christina M Wood-Wentz, Kent R Bailey, Bruce D Johnson
Anderson, Paul J., Christina M. Wood-Wentz, Kent R. Bailey, and Bruce D. Johnson. Objective versus self-reported sleep quality at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2017. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found little relationship between polysomnography and a diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS) using the Lake Louise Symptom Questionnaire (LLSQ). The correlation between sleep question responses on the LLSQ and polysomnography results has not been explored. We compared LLSQ sleep responses and polysomnography data from our previous study of workers rapidly transported to the South Pole...
November 27, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29166795/pharmacological-interventions-for-preventing-acute-mountain-sickness-a-network-meta-analysis-and-trial-sequential-analysis-of-randomized-clinical-trials
#18
Kannan Sridharan, Gowri Sivaramakrishnan
BACKGROUND: Individuals ascending to high altitude are at a risk of getting acute mountain sickness (AMS). The present study is a network meta-analysis comparing all the interventions available to prevent AMS. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched for randomized clinical trials evaluating the use of drugs to prevent AMS. Incidence of AMS was the primary outcome and incidence of severe AMS, paraesthesia (as side effect of acetazolamide use), headache and severe headache, and oxygen saturation were the secondary outcomes...
March 2018: Annals of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153259/reduction-of-olfactory-sensitivity-during-normobaric-hypoxia
#19
Tilman Huppertz, Jessica Freiherr, Bernhard Olzowy, Ulrich Kisser, Jutta Stephan, Gunther Fesl, Kathrin Haegler, Berend Feddersen, Rainald Fischer, Klaus Mees, Sven Becker
OBJECTIVE: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is caused by a low partial pressure of oxygen and may occur above 2500m. The aim of this research was to evaluate olfactory and gustatory abilities of healthy subjects during baseline conditions and after seven hours of normobaric hypoxia. METHODS: Sixteen healthy subjects were assessed using the Sniffin' Sticks, as well as intensity and pleasantness ratings. Gustatory function was evaluated utilizing the Taste Strips. Experiments were carried out under baseline conditions (518m altitude) followed by a second testing session after seven hours of normobaric hypoxia exposure (comparable to 4000m altitude)...
November 15, 2017: Auris, Nasus, Larynx
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29136449/does-this-patient-have-acute-mountain-sickness-the-rational-clinical-examination-systematic-review
#20
REVIEW
David Meier, Tinh-Hai Collet, Isabella Locatelli, Jacques Cornuz, Bengt Kayser, David L Simel, Claudio Sartori
Importance: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) affects more than 25% of individuals ascending to 3500 m (11 500 ft) and more than 50% of those above 6000 m (19 700 ft). AMS may progress from nonspecific symptoms to life-threatening high-altitude cerebral edema in less than 1% of patients. It is not clear how to best diagnose AMS. Objective: To systematically review studies assessing the accuracy of AMS diagnostic instruments, including the visual analog scale (VAS) score, which quantifies the overall feeling of sickness at altitude (VAS[O]; various thresholds), Acute Mountain Sickness-Cerebral score (AMS-C; ≥0...
November 14, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
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