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Justin Stebbing, Kalpit Shah, Lei Cheng Lit, Teresa Gagliano, Angeliki Ditsiou, Tingting Wang, Franz Wendler, Thomas Simon, Krisztina Sára Szabó, Timothy O'Hanlon, Michael Dean, April Camilla Roslani, Swee Hung Cheah, Soo-Chin Lee, Georgios Giamas
Lemur tyrosine kinase 3 (LMTK3) is an oncogenic kinase that is involved in different types of cancer (breast, lung, gastric, colorectal) and biological processes including proliferation, invasion, migration, chromatin remodeling as well as innate and acquired endocrine resistance. However, the role of LMTK3 in response to cytotoxic chemotherapy has not been investigated thus far. Using both 2D and 3D tissue culture models, we found that overexpression of LMTK3 decreased the sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to cytotoxic (doxorubicin) treatment...
March 15, 2018: Oncogene
Jon H Kaas, Hui-Xin Qi, Iwona Stepniewska
Many of the adaptive changes in the functional organization of parietal cortex of humans emerged in past in the early primates as they depended on visually guided forelimb use to grasp branches and food. Currently, human, apes and some monkeys have four well-defined subdivisions of anterior parietal cortex, areas 3a, 3b, 1 and 2 of Brodmann. In some of the smaller monkeys, and in stepsirrine primates (galagos, lemurs, and lorises), especially areas 1 and 2 are less developed, and the existence of an area 2 is questionable...
2018: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Cora L Singleton, Michelle L Sauther, Frank P Cuozzo, Ibrahim Antho Youssouf Jacky
The health of 44 wild ring-tailed lemurs ( Lemur catta) at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve was assessed across three age classes: <5 yr (young), 5-9 yr (adult), and ≥10 yr (old). Hematology and biochemistry tests were performed manually (leukocyte count and differential, packed cell volume, total protein) and using a point-of-care analyzer (hematocrit, hemoglobin, glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, sodium, potassium, chloride, ionized calcium, total carbon dioxide, anion gap), respectively. Urine specific gravity was measured via refractometry...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Sandra Nicklasson, Desirée Sjöström, Mats Amundin, Daniel Roth, Laura Teresa Hernandez Salazar, Matthias Laska
Primates have been found to differ widely in their taste perception and studies suggest that a co-evolution between plant species bearing a certain taste substance and primate species feeding on these plants may contribute to such between-species differences. Considering that only platyrrhine primates, but not catarrhine or prosimian primates, share an evolutionary history with the neotropical plant Stevia rebaudiana , we assessed whether members of these three primate taxa differ in their ability to perceive and/or in their sensitivity to its two quantitatively predominant sweet-tasting substances...
February 2018: Current Zoology
Marco Gamba, Livio Favaro, Alessandro Araldi, Valentina Matteucci, Cristina Giacoma, Olivier Friard
Vocal individuality is widespread in social animals. Individual variation in vocalizations is a prerequisite for discriminating among conspecifics and may have facilitated the evolution of large complex societies. Ring-tailed lemurs Lemur catta live in relatively large social groups, have conspicuous vocal repertoires, and their species-specific utterances can be interpreted in light of source-filter theory of vocal production. Indeed, their utterances allow individual discrimination and even recognition thanks to the resonance frequencies of the vocal tract...
August 2017: Current Zoology
Charlotte Gary, Anne-Sophie Hérard, Zoé Hanss, Marc Dhenain
Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. There is increasing interest in measuring levels of plasma Aβ since this could help in diagnosis of brain pathology. However, the value of plasma Aβ in such a diagnosis is still controversial and factors modulating its levels are still poorly understood. The mouse lemur ( Microcebus murinus ) is a primate model of cerebral aging which can also present with amyloid plaques and whose Aβ is highly homologous to humans'...
2018: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Julie Royo, Nicolas Villain, Delphine Champeval, Federico Del Gallo, Giuseppe Bertini, Fabienne Aujard, Fabien Pifferi
Among environmental factors that may affect on brain function, some nutrients and particularly n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) are required for optimal brain development. Their effects on cognitive functions, however, are still unclear, and studies in humans and rodents have yielded contradictory results. We used a non-human primate model, the grey mouse lemur, phylogenetically close to human. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the impact of n-3 PUFA supplementation on cognitive functions, neuronal activity and neurogenesis...
February 24, 2018: Behavioural Brain Research
Mansi P Saraf, Pooja Balaram, Fabien Pifferi, Răzvan Gămănuț, Henry Kennedy, Jon H Kaas
Mouse lemurs are the smallest of the living primates, and are members of the understudied radiation of strepsirrhine lemurs of Madagascar. They are thought to closely resemble the ancestral primates that gave rise to present day primates. Here we have used multiple histological and immunochemical methods to identify and characterize sensory areas of neocortex in four brains of adult lemurs obtained from a licensed breeding colony. We describe the laminar features for the primary visual area (V1), the secondary visual area (V2), the middle temporal visual area (MT) and area prostriata, somatosensory areas S1(3b), 3a, and area 1, the primary motor cortex (M1), and the primary auditory cortex (A1)...
February 26, 2018: Journal of Comparative Neurology
Barbara A Qurollo, Peter A Larsen, Hajanirina H Rakotondrainibe, Karine Mahefarisoa, Tsiky Rajaonarivelo, Josia Razafindramanana, Edward B Breitschwerdt, Randall E Junge, Cathy V Williams
The discovery and characterization of emerging tick-borne organisms are critical for global health initiatives to improve animal and human welfare (One Health). It is possible that unknown tick-borne organisms underlie a subset of undiagnosed illness in wildlife, domesticated species, and humans. Our study lends support to the One Health concept by highlighting the prevalence of three blood-borne organisms in wild lemurs living in close proximity to domesticated species and humans. Previously, our team identified three novel, presumably tick-borne, intravascular organisms, belonging to the genera Babesia, Borrelia, and Neoehrlichia, circulating in two of Madagascar's lemur species...
February 17, 2018: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases
Karen M Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen E Tracy, Karen R Lips, Kelly R Zamudio
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins in the acquired immune response pathway that often show distinctive selection-driven patterns in wild vertebrate populations. We examined genetic variation and signatures of selection in the MHC class I alpha 1 (A1)- and alpha 2 (A2)-domain encoding exons of two frog congeners [Agalychnis callidryas (n = 20) and A. lemur (n = 20)] from a single locality in Panama. We also investigated how historical demographic processes may have impacted MHC genetic diversity by analyzing a neutral mitochondrial marker...
February 15, 2018: Genetica
Dorothy Munkenbeck Fragaszy
With this issue, the editors inaugurate the Featured Article Essay in the Journal of Comparative Psychology . This brief essay, written by one or both of the editors, highlights one of the articles in each issue that is found to be particularly important, interesting, or innovative. The editors' choice for this issue is the article by Pellis and Pellis (2018) about play fighting in gray mouse lemurs ( Microcebus murinus ). (PsycINFO Database Record
February 2018: Journal of Comparative Psychology
Hanitriniaina Rakotonirina, Peter M Kappeler, Claudia Fichtel
BACKGROUND: Species recognition, i.e., the ability to distinguish conspecifics from heterospecifics, plays an essential role in reproduction. The role of facial cues for species recognition has been investigated in several non-human primate species except for lemurs. We therefore investigated the role of facial cues for species recognition in wild red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons) at Kirindy Forest. We presented adult red-fronted lemurs pictures of male faces from five species including red-fronted lemurs, three closely related species, white-fronted lemurs (E...
February 13, 2018: BMC Evolutionary Biology
Alexander Umanets, Iris de Winter, Freek IJdema, Javier Ramiro-Garcia, Pim van Hooft, Ignas M A Heitkönig, Herbert Ht Prins, Hauke Smidt
The microbiota of the mammalian gut is a complex ecosystem, the composition of which is greatly influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. In this study, we aim to investigate the influence of occupancy(a geographical area of habitation), species, age and sex on intestinal microbiota composition of the three lemur species Eulemur fulvus, E. rubriventer, and E. rufifrons. Faecal samples were collected from a total of 138 wild lemurs across Madagascar, and microbial composition was determined using next generation sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragments...
February 5, 2018: FEMS Microbiology Ecology
Rachel L Jacobs, David C Frankel, Riley J Rice, Vera J Kiefer, Brenda J Bradley
Genetic analyses of parentage sometimes reveal that "socially monogamous" (pair-living) species do not reside in strict family groups. Circumstances such as adult turnovers and extra-pair copulations, among others, may result in non-nuclear families. These genetic relationships within groups have implications for interpreting social behaviors. Red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer) live in groups generally comprising an adult male-female pair plus immatures, and early genetic analyses of parentage in a relatively small sample suggested they mate monogamously...
February 6, 2018: American Journal of Primatology
Tanvi P Honap, Luz-Andrea Pfister, Genevieve Housman, Sarah Mills, Ross P Tarara, Koichi Suzuki, Frank P Cuozzo, Michelle L Sauther, Michael S Rosenberg, Anne C Stone
Leprosy is caused by the bacterial pathogens Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis. Apart from humans, animals such as nine-banded armadillos in the Americas and red squirrels in the British Isles are naturally infected with M. leprae. Natural leprosy has also been reported in certain nonhuman primates, but it is not known whether these occurrences are due to incidental infections by human M. leprae strains or by M. leprae strains specific to nonhuman primates. In this study, complete M. leprae genomes from three naturally infected nonhuman primates (a chimpanzee from Sierra Leone, a sooty mangabey from West Africa, and a cynomolgus macaque from The Philippines) were sequenced...
January 2018: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Antoine D Veron, Cécile Bienboire-Frosini, François Feron, Elisa Codecasa, Arnaud Deveze, Dany Royer, Paul Watelet, Pietro Asproni, Kevin Sadelli, Camille Chabaud, Jean-Claude Stamegna, Joël Fagot, Michel Khrestchatisky, Alessandro Cozzi, François S Roman, Patrick Pageat, Manuel Mengoli, Stéphane D Girard
BACKGROUND: Stem cell-based therapies are an attractive option to promote regeneration and repair defective tissues and organs. Thanks to their multipotency, high proliferation rate and the lack of major ethical limitations, "olfactory ecto-mesenchymal stem cells" (OE-MSCs) have been described as a promising candidate to treat a variety of damaged tissues. Easily accessible in the nasal cavity of most mammals, these cells are highly suitable for autologous cell-based therapies and do not face issues associated with other stem cells...
January 17, 2018: BMC Veterinary Research
Anne-Claire Fabre, Jonathan M G Perry, Adam Hartstone-Rose, AuróLien Lowie, Andy Boens, MaÏtena Dumont
Despite great interest and decades of research, the musculoskeletal relationships of the masticatory system in primates are still not fully understood. However, without a clear understanding of the interplay between muscles and bones it remains difficult to understand the functional significance of morphological traits of the skeleton. Here, we aim to study the impacts of the masticatory muscles on the shape of the cranium and the mandible as well as their co-variation in strepsirrhine primates. To do so, we use 3D geometric morphometric approaches to assess the shape of each bone of the skull of 20 species for which muscle data are available in the literature...
February 2018: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
Anne M Burrows
Mammalian skeletal muscle is influenced by the functional demands placed upon it. Functional morphology of facial expression musculature, or mimetic musculature, is largely unknown. Recently, primate mimetic musculature has been shown to respond to demands associated with social factors. Body size has also been demonstrated to affect many aspects of primate functional morphology and evolutionary morphology. The present study was designed to further examine the role of social variables and body size in influencing the morphology of primate mimetic musculature using a broad phylogenetic range of primates, primates with varying body sizes, and those that exploit differing time of day activity cycles and social group sizes...
February 2018: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
Jonathan M G Perry
The jaw adductor muscles of extinct mammals are often reconstructed to elucidate paleoecological relationships and to make broad comparisons among taxa. Muscle lever arms, bite load arms, muscle dimensions, and gape are often also reconstructed to better understand feeding. Several different approaches to these and related goals are discussed here. A protocol for reconstructing muscle dimensions and bite force using biomechanically informative skull measurements and osteological proxies of muscle dimensions is described and applied to a case study of subfossil Malagasy lemurs...
February 2018: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
Sheena L Faherty, José Luis Villanueva-Cañas, Marina B Blanco, M Mar Albà, Anne D Yoder
Hibernation is an adaptive strategy some mammals use to survive highly seasonal or unpredictable environments. We present the first investigation on the transcriptomics of hibernation in a natural population of primate hibernators: Crossley's dwarf lemurs (Cheirogaleus crossleyi). Using capture-mark-recapture techniques to track the same animals over a period of 7 months in Madagascar, we used RNA-seq to compare gene expression profiles in white adipose tissue (WAT) during three distinct physiological states...
January 10, 2018: Molecular Ecology
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