Read by QxMD icon Read

climate change and health

Jamie R Wood
Ancient samples present a number of technical challenges for DNA barcoding, including damaged DNA with low endogenous copy number and short fragment lengths. Nevertheless, techniques are available to overcome these issues, and DNA barcoding has now been used to successfully recover parasite DNA from a wide variety of ancient substrates, including coprolites, cesspit sediment, mummified tissues, burial sediments and permafrost soils. The study of parasite DNA from ancient samples can provide a number of unique scientific insights, for example: (1) into the parasite communities and health of prehistoric human populations; (2) the ability to reconstruct the natural parasite faunas of rare or extinct host species, which has implications for conservation management and de-extinction; and (3) the ability to view in 'real-time' processes that may operate over century- or millenial-timescales, such as how parasites responded to past climate change events or how they co-evolved alongside their hosts...
March 20, 2018: Parasitology
Nicola Banwell, Shannon Rutherford, Brendan Mackey, Roger Street, Cordia Chu
Disasters and climate change have significant implications for human health worldwide. Both climate change and the climate-sensitive hazards that result in disasters, are discussed in terms of direct and indirect impacts on health. A growing body of literature has argued for the need to link disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation. However, there is limited articulation of the commonalities between these health impacts. Understanding the shared risk pathways is an important starting point for developing joint strategies for adapting to, and reducing, health risks...
March 16, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Juline M Walter, Fabyano A C Lopes, Mônica Lopes-Ferreira, Lívia M Vidal, Luciana Leomil, Fabiana Melo, Girlene S de Azevedo, Rossandra M S Oliveira, Alba J Medeiros, Adriana S O Melo, Carlos E De Rezende, Amilcar Tanuri, Fabiano L Thompson
Harmful cyanobacterial blooms have become increasingly common in freshwater ecosystems in recent decades, mainly due to eutrophication and climate change. Water becomes unreliable for human consumption. Here, we report a comprehensive study carried out to investigate the water quality of several Campina Grande reservoirs. Our approach included metagenomics, microbial abundance quantification, ELISA test for three cyanotoxins (microcystin, nodularins, and cylindrospermopsin), and in vivo ecotoxicological tests with zebrafish embryos...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Vinicius A C Abreu, Rafael V Popin, Danillo O Alvarenga, Patricia D C Schaker, Caroline Hoff-Risseti, Alessandro M Varani, Marli F Fiore
Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is a freshwater cyanobacterial species with increasing bloom reports worldwide that are likely due to factors related to climate change. In addition to the deleterious effects of blooms on aquatic ecosystems, the majority of ecotypes can synthesize toxic secondary metabolites causing public health issues. To overcome the harmful effects of C. raciborskii blooms, it is important to advance knowledge of diversity, genetic variation, and evolutionary processes within populations...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Maria Grazia Dente, Flavia Riccardo, Gloria Nacca, Alessia Ranghiasci, Camille Escadafal, Lobna Gaayeb, Miguel Angel Jiménez-Clavero, Jean-Claude Manuguerra, Marie Picard, Jovita Fernández-Pinero, Elisa Pérez-Ramírez, Vincent Robert, Kathleen Victoir, Silvia Declich
In the context of One Health, there is presently an effort to integrate surveillance of human, animal, entomological, and environmental sectors. This aims to strengthen the prevention of, and preparedness against, arbovirus infections, also in the light of environmental and climate changes that could increase the risk of transmission. However, criteria to define integrated surveillance, and to compare different systems, still need to be identified and tested. We conducted a scoping review to identify and examine surveillance systems for West Nile virus (WNV), chikungunya virus (CHKV), dengue virus (DENV), and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which involve human, animal, entomological, and environmental sectors...
March 10, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Guoxing Li, Qun Guo, Yang Liu, Yixue Li, Xiaochuan Pan
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Global warming has attracted worldwide attention. Numerous studies have indicated that stroke is associated with temperature; however, few studies are available on the projections of the burden of stroke attributable to future climate change. We aimed to investigate the future trends of stroke years of life lost (YLL) associated with global warming. METHODS: We collected death records to examine YLL in Tianjin, China, from 2006 to 2011. We fitted a standard time-series Poisson regression model after controlling for trends, day of the week, relative humidity, and air pollution...
March 9, 2018: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Daniel E Sonenshine
Ticks are the major vectors of most disease-causing agents to humans, companion animals and wildlife. Moreover, ticks transmit a greater variety of pathogenic agents than any other blood-feeding arthropod. Ticks have been expanding their geographic ranges in recent decades largely due to climate change. Furthermore, tick populations in many areas of their past and even newly established localities have increased in abundance. These dynamic changes present new and increasing severe public health threats to humans, livestock and companion animals in areas where they were previously unknown or were considered to be of minor importance...
March 9, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Gregory D Kearney, Ronny A Bell
The geographic position and high level of poverty in the southeastern United States are significant risk factors that contribute to the region's high vulnerability to climate change. The goal of this study was to evaluate beliefs and perceptions of global warming among those living in poverty in the poorest counties in the southeastern United States. Results from this project may be used to support public health efforts to increase climate-related messaging to vulnerable and underserved communities. This was an ecological study that analyzed public opinion poll estimates from previously gathered national level survey data (2016)...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice: JPHMP
Lorenzo Cecchi, Gennaro D'Amato, Isabella Annesi-Maesano
Allergies are complex diseases that result from interactions between multiple genetic and environmental factors. However, the increase in allergies observed in the past decades is explained exclusively by environmental changes occurring in the same period. Presently, the exposome, the totality of specific and nonspecific external environmental exposures (external exposome) to which a subject is exposed from preconception onward and their consequences at the organ and cell levels (internal exposome), is being considered to explain the inception, development, and exacerbations of allergic diseases...
March 2018: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Oliver Hailes, Rhys Jones, David Menkes, Joshua Freeman, Erik Monasterio
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 9, 2018: New Zealand Medical Journal
Michele Ochsner, Elizabeth G Marshall, Daniel Lefkowitz
BACKGROUND: Given predictions that climate change will lead to an increase in severe storms, it is important to more fully understand the risks experienced by workers charged with the cleanup and removal of storm damaged trees. These hazards have received little attention in the occupational safety and health literature. METHODS: This paper is based on semi-structured interviews with 23 stakeholders involved in the Hurricane Sandy cleanup effort. RESULTS: Interview participants identified at risk sectors, gaps in training and preparedness, and raised particular concerns about storm downed trees, electrical hazards, and fatigue and suggested steps to reduce these hazards...
March 8, 2018: American Journal of Industrial Medicine
Rune Dietz, Anders Mosbech, Janne Flora, Igor Eulaers
Despite the remoteness of the North Water, Northwest Greenland, the local Inughuit population is affected by global anthropogenic pollution and climate change. Using a cross-disciplinary approach combining Mercury (Hg) analysis, catch information, and historical and anthropological perspectives, this article elucidates how the traditional diet is compromised by Hg pollution originating from lower latitudes. In a new approach we here show how the Inughuits in Avanersuaq are subject to high Hg exposure from the hunted traditional food, consisting of mainly marine seabirds and mammals...
March 7, 2018: Ambio
Simone Miranda da Costa, José Luís Passos Cordeiro, Elizabeth Ferreira Rangel
BACKGROUND: Leishmaniasis represents an important public health problem in Brazil. The continuous process of urbanization and expansion of human activities in forest areas impacts natural habitats, modifying the ecology of some species of Leishmania, as well as its vectors and reservoirs and, consequently, changes the epidemiological pattern that contributes to the expansion of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. Here, we discuss Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) whitmani, the main vector of ACL, transmitting two dermotropic Leishmania species including Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and Leishmania (V...
March 7, 2018: Parasites & Vectors
Se Ji Jung, Jodhbir Mehta, Louis Tong
The twenty-first century is fraught with dangers like climate change and pollution, which impacts human health and mortality. As levels of pollution increase, respiratory illnesses and cardiovascular ailments become more prevalent. Less understood are the eye-related complaints, which are commonly associated with increasing pollution. Affected people may complain of irritation, redness, foreign body sensation, tearing, and blurring of vision. Sources of pollution are varied, ranging from gases (such as ozone and NO2 ) and particulate matter produced from traffic, to some other hazards associated with indoor environments...
March 3, 2018: Ocular Surface
Nicola Wheeler, Nick Watts
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Climate change poses a significant threat to human health. Understanding how climate science can be translated into public health practice is an essential first step in enabling robust adaptation and improving resiliency to climate change. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research highlights the importance of iterative approaches to public health adaptation to climate change, enabling uncertainties of health impacts and barriers to adaptation to be accounted for...
March 5, 2018: Current Environmental Health Reports
Pierre Ongolo-Zogo, John N Lavis, Goran Tomson, Nelson K Sewankambo
There is a scarcity of empirical data on the influence of initiatives supporting evidence-informed health system policy-making (EIHSP), such as the knowledge translation platforms (KTPs) operating in Africa. To assess whether and how two KTPs housed in government-affiliated institutions in Cameroon and Uganda have influenced: (1) health system policy-making processes and decisions aiming at supporting achievement of the health millennium development goals (MDGs); and (2) the general climate for EIHSP. We conducted an embedded comparative case study of four policy processes in which Evidence Informed Policy Network (EVIPNet) Cameroon and Regional East African Community Health Policy Initiative (REACH-PI) Uganda were involved between 2009 and 2011...
February 28, 2018: Health Policy and Planning
Hina Asad, David O Carpenter
Zika is a vector-borne viral disease transmitted to humans primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The increased climate instability has contributed to the emergence of infections carried by mosquitoes like dengue, chikungunya and zika. While infection with the zika virus is not new, the recent epidemic of microcephaly in Brazil and other countries in South America resulting from the infection of pregnant women with the zika virus raise a number of serious public health concerns. These include the question of how climate change affects the range of zika vectors, what can we do to shorten the length of mosquito season, how and why the symptoms of zika infection have changed and what can be done to reduce the burden of human disease from this infection? Another important question that needs to be answered is what are the factors that caused the zika virus to leave the non-human primates and/or other mammals and invade the human population?...
March 28, 2018: Reviews on Environmental Health
Guoxing Li, Yixue Li, Lin Tian, Qun Guo, Xiaochuan Pan
It is widely accepted that temperatures is associated with cardiovascular mortality, however, few studies have explored the effects of temperature on years of life lost (YLL) from cardiovascular mortality in China under future global warming scenarios. Therefore, there is an urgent need to obtain projections of YLL from cardiovascular diseases. Here we applied nineteen global-scale climate models (GCMs) and three Representative Concentration Pathway emission scenarios (RCPs) in the 2050s and 2070s for temperature-related YLL projection in Tianjin, China...
February 27, 2018: Science of the Total Environment
Connie O'Driscoll, José L J Ledesma, John Coll, John G Murnane, Paul Nolan, Eva M Mockler, Martyn N Futter, Liwen W Xiao
Natural organic matter poses an increasing challenge to water managers because of its potential adverse impacts on water treatment and distribution, and subsequently human health. Projections were made of impacts of climate change on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the primarily agricultural Boyne catchment which is used as a potable water supply in Ireland. The results indicated that excluding a potential rise in extreme precipitation, future projected loads are not dissimilar to those observed under current conditions...
February 27, 2018: Science of the Total Environment
Julie Lewis, Corinne R Boudreau, James W Patterson, Jonathan Bradet-Legris, Vett K Lloyd
Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in North America and Europe, and on-going surveillance is required to monitor the spread of the tick vectors as their populations expand under the influence of climate change. Active surveillance involves teams of researchers collecting ticks from field locations with the potential to be sites of establishing tick populations. This process is labor- and time-intensive, limiting the number of sites monitored and the frequency of monitoring. Citizen science initiatives are ideally suited to address this logistical problem and generate high-density and complex data from sites of community importance...
March 2, 2018: Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland)
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"