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Nuclear lamin

Paola Spitalieri, Rosa V Talarico, Silvia Caioli, Michela Murdocca, Annalucia Serafino, Marco Girasole, Simone Dinarelli, Giovanni Longo, Sabina Pucci, Annalisa Botta, Giuseppe Novelli, Cristina Zona, Ruggiero Mango, Federica Sangiuolo
Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystemic disease, autosomal dominant, caused by a CTG repeat expansion in DMPK gene. We assessed the appropriateness of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) as a model to recapitulate some aspects of the pathogenetic mechanism involving cardiac manifestations in DM1 patients. Once obtained in vitro, CMs have been characterized for their morphology and their functionality. CMs DM1 show intranuclear foci and transcript markers abnormally spliced respect to WT ones, as well as several irregularities in nuclear morphology, probably caused by an unbalanced lamin A/C ratio...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Graham F Brady, Raymond Kwan, Juliana Bragazzi Cunha, Jared S Elenbaas, M Bishr Omary
The nuclear lamina is a multi-protein lattice composed of A- and B-type lamins and their associated proteins. This protein lattice associates with heterochromatin and integral inner nuclear membrane proteins, providing a link between the genome, nucleoskeleton, and cytoskeleton. In the 1990s, mutations in EMD and LMNA were linked to Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Since then, the number of diseases attributed to nuclear lamina defects, including laminopathies and other disorders, has increased to include more than 20 distinct genetic syndromes...
March 13, 2018: Gastroenterology
Arantza Infante, Clara I Rodríguez
Aging is a complex biological process, which involves multiple mechanisms with different levels of regulation. Senescent cells are known to secrete senescence-associated proteins, which exert negative influences on surrounding cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the common progenitors for bone, cartilage and adipose tissue (which are especially affected tissues in aging), are known to secrete a broad spectrum of biologically active proteins with both paracrine and autocrine functions in many biological processes...
March 15, 2018: Scientific Reports
Hyung Wook Park, Hong-Lim Kim, Yong Soo Park, In-Beom Kim
The retina is a highly specialised part of the brain responsible for visual processing. It is well-laminated; three layers containing five different types of neurons are compartmentalised by two synaptic layers. Among the retinal layers, the inner nuclear layer (INL) is composed of horizontal, bipolar, and amacrine cell types. Bipolar cells form one sublayer in the distal half of the IPL, while amacrine cells form another sublayer in the proximal half, without any border-like structure. Here, we report that a plexiform layer-like structure exists temporarily in the border between the bipolar and amacrine sublayers in the INL in the rat retina during retinal development...
February 2018: Experimental Neurobiology
Jeong-Ki Kim, Arghavan Louhghalam, Geonhui Lee, Benjamin W Schafer, Denis Wirtz, Dong-Hwee Kim
In the original version of this Article, the affiliation details for Arghavan Louhghalam were incorrectly given as 'Institute for NanoBioTechnology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21218, USA', and it should have been given as 'Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA 02747, USA'. Furthermore, an incorrect grant number, R1610512, was acknowledged. The correct grant number is NRF-2016R1C1B2015018. These errors have now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article...
March 13, 2018: Nature Communications
Nolwenn Briand, Philippe Collas
The nuclear lamina contributes to the regulation of gene expression and to chromatin organization. Mutations in A-type nuclear lamins cause laminopathies, some of which are associated with a loss of heterochromatin at the nuclear periphery. Until recently however, little if any information has been provided on where and how lamin A interacts with the genome and on how disease-causing lamin A mutations may rearrange genome conformation. Here, we review aspects of nuclear lamin association with the genome. We highlight recent evidence of reorganization of lamin A-chromatin interactions in cellular models of laminopathies, and implications on the 3-dimensional rearrangement of chromatin in these models, including patient cells...
March 8, 2018: Nucleus
Ines J de Castro, Raquel Sales Gil, Lorena Ligammari, Maria Laura Di Giacinto, Paola Vagnarelli
Micronuclei (MN) arise from chromosomes or fragments that fail to be incorporated into the primary nucleus after cell division. These structures are a major source of genetic instability caused by DNA repair and replication defects coupled to aberrant Nuclear Envelope (NE). These problems ultimately lead to a spectrum of chromosome rearrangements called chromothripsis, a phenomenon that is a hallmark of several cancers. Despite its importance, the molecular mechanism at the origin of this instability is still not understood...
January 30, 2018: Oncotarget
Can Zhou, Li Rao, Catherine M Shanahan, Qiuping Zhang
Nesprins (nuclear envelope spectrin repeat proteins) are multi-isomeric scaffolding proteins. Nesprin-1 and -2 are highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles and together with SUN (Sad1p/UNC84) domain-containing proteins form the LInker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complex at the nuclear envelope in association with lamin A/C and emerin. Mutations in nesprin-1/2 have been found in patients with autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) as well as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)...
February 27, 2018: Biochemical Society Transactions
Holly Whitton, Larry N Singh, Marissa A Patrick, Andrew J Price, Fernando G Osorio, Carlos López-Otín, Irina M Bochkis
Increasing evidence suggests that regulation of heterochromatin at the nuclear envelope underlies metabolic disease susceptibility and age-dependent metabolic changes, but the mechanism is unknown. Here, we profile lamina-associated domains (LADs) using lamin B1 ChIP-Seq in young and old hepatocytes and find that, although lamin B1 resides at a large fraction of domains at both ages, a third of lamin B1-associated regions are bound exclusively at each age in vivo. Regions occupied by lamin B1 solely in young livers are enriched for the forkhead motif, bound by Foxa pioneer factors...
February 27, 2018: Aging Cell
Angela Palmigiano, Francesco Santaniello, Aurora Cerutti, Dmitry Penkov, Divya Purushothaman, Ekta Makhija, Lucilla Luzi, Fabrizio d'Adda di Fagagna, Pier Giuseppe Pelicci, Viveswara Shivashankar, Gaetano Ivan Dellino, Francesco Blasi
The synthesis of middle-to-late-replicating DNA can be affected independently of the rest of the genome by down-regulating the tumor suppressor PREP1 (PKNOX1). Indeed, DNA combing shows that PREP1 down-regulation affects DNA replication rate, increases the number of simultaneously firing origins and the asymmetry of DNA replication, leading to DNA damage. Genome-wide analysis of replication timing by Repli-seq shows that, upon PREP1 down-regulation, 25% of the genome is replicated earlier in the S-phase. The targeted DNA sequences correspond to Lamin-Associated Domains (LADs), and include late-replicating (LRRs) and temporal transition regions (TTRs)...
February 16, 2018: Scientific Reports
Carola Dewitz, Sofia Pimpinella, Patrick Hackel, Altuna Akalin, Thomas M Jessell, Niccolò Zampieri
Motor neurons in the spinal cord are found grouped in nuclear structures termed pools, whose position is precisely orchestrated during development. Despite the emerging role of pool organization in the assembly of spinal circuits, little is known about the morphogenetic programs underlying the patterning of motor neuron subtypes. We applied three-dimensional analysis of motor neuron position to reveal the roles and contributions of cell adhesive function by inactivating N-cadherin, catenin, and afadin signaling...
February 13, 2018: Cell Reports
Nolwenn Briand, Anne-Claire Guénantin, Dorota Jeziorowska, Akshay Shah, Matthieu Mantecon, Emilie Capel, Marie Garcia, Anja Oldenburg, Jonas Paulsen, Jean-Sebastien Hulot, Corinne Vigouroux, Philippe Collas
The p.R482W hotspot mutation in A-type nuclear lamins causes familial partial lipodystrophy of Dunnigan-type (FPLD2), a lipodystrophic syndrome complicated by early-onset atherosclerosis. Molecular mechanisms underlying endothelial cell dysfunction conferred by the lamin A mutation remain elusive. However, lamin A regulates epigenetic developmental pathways and mutations could perturb these functions. Here, we demonstrate that lamin A R482W elicits endothelial differentiation defects in a developmental model of FPLD2...
February 9, 2018: Human Molecular Genetics
Erik Laurini, Valentina Martinelli, Thomas Lanzicher, Luca Puzzi, Daniele Borin, Suet Nee Chen, Carlin S Long, Patrice Lee, Luisa Mestroni, Matthew R G Taylor, Orfeo Sbaizero, Sabrina Pricl
Aims: Given the clinical impact of LMNA cardiomyopathies, understanding lamin function will fulfill a clinical need and will lead to advancement in the treatment of heart failure. A multidisciplinary approach combining cell biology, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling was used to analyze the biomechanical properties of human lamin A/C gene (LMNA) mutations (E161K, D192G, N195K) using an in vitro neonatal rat ventricular myocyte (NRVM) model. Methods and Results: The severity of biomechanical defects due to the three LMNA mutations correlated with the severity of the clinical phenotype...
February 8, 2018: Cardiovascular Research
Natalia von Muhlinen, Izumi Horikawa, Fatima Alam, Kazunobu Isogaya, Delphine Lissa, Borek Vojtesek, David P Lane, Curtis C Harris
Cellular senescence is a hallmark of normal aging and aging-related syndromes, including the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic disorder caused by a single mutation in the LMNA gene that results in the constitutive expression of a truncated splicing mutant of lamin A known as progerin. Progerin accumulation leads to increased cellular stresses including unrepaired DNA damage, activation of the p53 signaling pathway and accelerated senescence. We previously established that the p53 isoforms ∆133p53 and p53β regulate senescence in normal human cells...
February 12, 2018: Oncogene
Shahienaz E Hampton, Timothy M Dore, Walter K Schmidt
Ras converting enzyme 1 (Rce1) is an integral membrane endoprotease localized to the endoplasmic reticulum that mediates the cleavage of the carboxyl-terminal three amino acids from CaaX proteins, whose members play important roles in cell signaling processes. Examples include the Ras family of small GTPases, the γ-subunit of heterotrimeric GTPases, nuclear lamins, and protein kinases and phosphatases. CaaX proteins, especially Ras, have been implicated in cancer, and understanding the post-translational modifications of CaaX proteins would provide insight into their biological function and regulation...
February 9, 2018: Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Emilie Lukášová, Aleš Kovařík, Stanislav Kozubek
Anchoring of heterochromatin to the nuclear envelope appears to be an important process ensuring the spatial organization of the chromatin structure and genome function in eukaryotic nuclei. Proteins of the inner nuclear membrane (INM) mediating these interactions are able to recognize lamina-associated heterochromatin domains (termed LAD) and simultaneously bind either lamin A/C or lamin B1. One of these proteins is the lamin B receptor (LBR) that binds lamin B1 and tethers heterochromatin to the INM in embryonic and undifferentiated cells...
February 6, 2018: Cells
Aurora Paola Borroni, Andrea Emanuelli, Pooja Anil Shah, Nataša Ilić, Liat Apel-Sarid, Biagio Paolini, Dhanoop Manikoth Ayyathan, Praveen Koganti, Gal Levy-Cohen, Michael Blank
A-lamins, encoded by the LMNA gene, are major structural components of the nuclear lamina coordinating essential cellular processes. Mutations in the LMNA gene and/or alterations in its expression levels have been linked to a distinct subset of human disorders, collectively known as laminopathies, and to cancer. Mechanisms regulating A-lamins are mostly obscure. Here, we identified E3 ubiquitin ligase Smurf2 as a physiological regulator of lamin A and its disease-associated mutant form progerin (LAΔ50), whose expression underlies the development of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a devastating premature aging syndrome...
February 5, 2018: Aging Cell
Jau-Ye Shiu, Lina Aires, Zhe Lin, Viola Vogel
A robust nanopillar platform with increased spatial resolution reveals that perinuclear forces, originating from stress fibres spanning the nucleus of fibroblasts, are significantly higher on these nanostructured substrates than the forces acting on peripheral adhesions. Many perinuclear adhesions embrace several nanopillars at once, pulling them into β1-integrin- and zyxin-rich clusters, which are able to translocate in the direction of cell motion without losing their tensile strength. The high perinuclear forces are greatly reduced upon inhibition of cell contractility or actin polymerization and disruption of the actin cap by KASH dominant-negative mutant expression...
February 5, 2018: Nature Cell Biology
Roman Petrovsky, Georg Krohne, Jörg Großhans
The nuclear envelope has a stereotypic morphology consisting of a flat double layer of the inner and outer nuclear membrane, with interspersed nuclear pores. Underlying and tightly linked to the inner nuclear membrane is the nuclear lamina, a proteinous layer of intermediate filament proteins and associated proteins. Physiological, experimental or pathological alterations in the constitution of the lamina lead to changes in nuclear morphology, such as blebs and lobulations. It has so far remained unclear whether the morphological changes depend on the differentiation state and the specific lamina protein...
January 24, 2018: European Journal of Cell Biology
Lauren Penfield, Brian Wysolmerski, Michael Mauro, Reza Farhadifar, Michael A Martinez, Ronald Biggs, Hai-Yin Wu, Curtis Broberg, Daniel Needleman, Shirin Bahmanyar
Recent work done exclusively in tissue culture cells revealed that the nuclear envelope (NE) ruptures and repairs in interphase. The duration of NE ruptures depends on lamins, however the underlying mechanisms and relevance to in vivo events is not known. Here, we use the C. elegans zygote to analyze lamin's role in NE rupture and repair in vivo Transient NE ruptures and subsequent NE collapse are induced by weaknesses in the nuclear lamina caused by expression of an engineered hypomorphic C. elegans lamin allele...
January 31, 2018: Molecular Biology of the Cell
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