Read by QxMD icon Read

Nuclear lamin

Kathleen M Clark, Jermaine L Jenkins, Nadia Fedoriw, Mark E Dumont
The function and localization of proteins and peptides containing C-terminal "CaaX" (Cys-aliphatic-aliphatic-anything) sequence motifs are modulated by post-translational attachment of isoprenyl groups to the cysteine sulfhydryl, followed by proteolytic cleavage of the aaX amino acids. The zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24 is one of two enzymes known to catalyze this cleavage. The only identified target of mammalian ZMPSTE24 is prelamin A, the precursor to the nuclear scaffold protein lamin A. ZMPSTE24 also cleaves prelamin A at a second site 15 residues upstream from the CaaX site...
October 24, 2016: Protein Science: a Publication of the Protein Society
Emilie Lukasova, Aleš Kovařík, Alena Bačíková, Martin Falk, Stanislav Kozubek
The cellular transition to senescence is associated with extensive chromatin reorganization and gene expression changes. Recent studies appeared implying an association of lamin B1 (LB1) reduction with chromatin rearrangement in human fibroblasts promoted to senescence, while the mechanisms and structural features of these relations were not yet clarified. In this work we examined the functions of LB1 and lamin B receptor (LBR) in human cancer cells. We found that both LB1 and LBR tend to deplete during cancer cells transfer to senescence by γ-irradiation...
October 19, 2016: Biochemical Journal
Subarna Dutta, Maitree Bhattacharyya, Kaushik Sengupta
Lamins are mechanosensitive and elastic components of the nuclear lamina that respond to external mechanical cues by altering gene regulation in a feedback mechanism. Numerous mutations in A-type lamins cause a plethora of diverse diseases collectively termed as laminopathies, the majority of which are characterized by irregularly shaped, fragile, and plastic nuclei. These nuclei are challenged to normal mechanotransduction and lead to disease phenotypes. Here, we review our current understanding of the nucleocytoskeleton coupling in mechanotransduction mediated by lamins...
October 14, 2016: Cells
Xia Zhang, Jingyu Hu, Yan Chen
Betulinic acid (BA), a lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenoid saponin from tree bark, has the potential to induce the apoptosis of cancer cells without toxicity towards normal cells in vitro and in vivo. The antitumor pharmacological effects of BA consist of triggering apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, regulating the cell cycle and the angiogenic pathway via factors, including specificity protein transcription factors, cyclin D1 and epidermal growth factor receptor, inhibiting the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor‑κB signaling pathways, preventing the invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, and affecting the expression of topoisomerase I, p53 and lamin B1...
October 4, 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Xuan Cao, Emad Moeendarbary, Philipp Isermann, Patricia M Davidson, Xiao Wang, Michelle B Chen, Anya K Burkart, Jan Lammerding, Roger D Kamm, Vivek B Shenoy
It is now evident that the cell nucleus undergoes dramatic shape changes during important cellular processes such as cell transmigration through extracellular matrix and endothelium. Recent experimental data suggest that during cell transmigration the deformability of the nucleus could be a limiting factor, and the morphological and structural alterations that the nucleus encounters can perturb genomic organization that in turn influences cellular behavior. Despite its importance, a biophysical model that connects the experimentally observed nuclear morphological changes to the underlying biophysical factors during transmigration through small constrictions is still lacking...
October 4, 2016: Biophysical Journal
Catalina Ana Rosselló, Lisa Lindström, Johan Glindre, Greta Eklund, Maria Alvarado-Kristensson
The cytosolic role of γ-tubulin as a microtubule organizer has been studied thoroughly, but its nuclear function is poorly understood. Here, we show that γ-tubulin is located throughout the chromatin of demembranated Xenopus laevis sperm and, as the nucleus is formed, γ-tubulin recruits lamin B3 and nuclear membranes. Immunodepletion of γ-tubulin impairs X. laevis assembly of both the lamina and the nuclear membrane. During nuclear formation in mammalian cell lines, γ-tubulin establishes a cellular protein boundary around chromatin that coordinates nuclear assembly of the daughter nuclei...
September 2016: Heliyon
Courtney R Bone, Yu-Tai Chang, Natalie E Cain, Shaun P Murphy, Daniel A Starr
Cellular migrations through constricted spaces are a critical aspect of many developmental and disease processes including hematopoiesis, inflammation, and metastasis. A limiting factor in these events is nuclear deformation. Here, we establish an in vivo model where nuclei can be visualized while moving through constrictions and use it to elucidate mechanisms for nuclear migration. C. elegans hypodermal P-cell larval nuclei traverse a narrow space about 5% their width. This constriction is blocked by fibrous organelles, structures connecting the muscles to cuticle through P cells...
October 3, 2016: Development
Ketaki Apte, Reimer Stick, Manfred Radmacher
The lamina is a filamentous meshwork beneath the inner nuclear membrane that confers mechanical stability to nuclei. The E145K mutation in lamin A causes Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). It affects lamin filament assembly and induces profound changes in the nuclear architecture. Expression of wild-type and E145K lamin A in Xenopus oocytes followed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) probing of isolated oocyte nuclei has shown significant changes in the mechanical properties of the lamina. Nuclei of oocytes expressing E145K lamin A are stiffer than those expressing wild-type lamin A...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Molecular Recognition: JMR
Andrew M Cobb, Thomas V Murray, Derek T Warren, Yiwen Liu, Catherine M Shanahan
The accumulation of prelamin A is linked to disruption of cellular homeostasis, tissue degeneration and ageing. Its expression is implicated in compromised genome stability and increased levels of DNA damage, but to date there is no complete explanation for how prelamin A exerts its toxic effects. As the nuclear lamina is important for DNA replication we wanted to investigate the relationship between prelamin A expression and DNA replication fork stability. In this study we report that the expression of prelamin A in U2OS cells induced both mono-ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and subsequent induction of Pol η, two hallmarks of DNA replication fork stalling...
September 27, 2016: Nucleus
Noam Zuela, Jehudith Dorfman, Yosef Gruenbaum
There are numerous heritable diseases associated with mutations in the LMNA gene. Most of these laminopathic diseases, including several muscular dystrophies, are autosomal dominant and have tissue-specific phenotypes. Our previous studies have shown that the globally expressed Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD)-linked lamin mutation, L535P, disrupts nuclear mechanical response specifically in muscle nuclei of C. elegans leading to atrophy of the body muscle cells and to reduced motility. Here we used RNA sequencing to analyze the global changes in gene expression caused by the L535P EDMD lamin mutation in order to gain better understanding of disease mechanisms and the correlation between transcription and phenotype...
September 27, 2016: Nucleus
Yee-Ki Lee, Yu Jiang, Xin-Ru Ran, Yee-Man Lau, Kwong-Man Ng, Wing-Hon Kevin Lai, Chung-Wah Siu, Hung-Fat Tse
Laminopathy is a disease closely related to deficiency of the nuclear matrix protein lamin A/C or failure in prelamin A processing, and leads to accumulation of the misfold protein causing progeria. The resultant disrupted lamin function is highly associated with abnormal nuclear architecture, cell senescence, apoptosis, and unstable genome integrity. To date, the effects of loss in nuclear integrity on the susceptible organ, striated muscle, have been commonly associated with muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiac myopathy (DCM), and conduction defeats, but have not been studied intensively...
2016: Stem Cell Research & Therapy
Syeda Ridita Sharif, Ariful Islam, Il Soo Moon
N-acetyl-D-glucosamine kinase (GlcNAc kinase or NAGK) primarily catalyzes phosphoryl transfer to GlcNAc during amino sugar metabolism. Recently, it was shown NAGK interacts with dynein light chain roadblock type 1 (DYNLRB1) and upregulates axo-dendritic growth, which is an enzyme activity-independent, non-canonical structural role. The authors examined the distributions of NAGK and NAGK-dynein complexes during the cell cycle in HEK293T cells. NAGK was expressed throughout different stages of cell division and immunocytochemistry (ICC) showed NAGK was localized at nuclear envelope, spindle microtubules (MTs), and kinetochores (KTs)...
September 2016: Molecules and Cells
Axel Poulet, Aline V Probst, Katja Graumann, Christophe Tatout, David E Evans
In this study, we explore the plasticity during evolution of proteins of the higher plant nuclear envelope (NE) from the most ancestral plant species to advanced angiosperms. The higher plant NE contains a functional Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complex based on conserved Sad1-Unc84 (SUN) domain proteins and plant specific Klarsicht/Anc1/Syne homology (KASH) domain proteins. Recent evidence suggests the presence of a plant lamina underneath the inner membrane and various coiled-coil proteins have been hypothesised to be associated with it including Crowded Nuclei (CRWN; also termed LINC and NMCP), Nuclear Envelope Associated Protein (NEAP) protein families as well as the CRWN binding protein KAKU4...
September 19, 2016: Nucleus
Wei Xie, Alexandre Chojnowski, Thomas Boudier, John S Y Lim, Sohail Ahmed, Zheng Ser, Colin Stewart, Brian Burke
The nuclear lamina is a universal feature of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs) [1]. In mammalian cells, it appears as a 10-30 nm filamentous layer at the nuclear face of the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and is composed primarily of A- and B-type lamins, members of the intermediate filament family [2]. While providing structural integrity to the NE, the lamina also represents an important signaling and regulatory platform [3]. Two A-type lamin isoforms, lamins A and C (LaA and LaC), are expressed in most adult human cells...
October 10, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Jean M Underwood, Klaus Becker, Gary S Stein, Jeffrey A Nickerson
The epigenetics and molecular biology of human embryonic stem cells (hES cells) have received much more attention than their architecture. We present a more complete look at hES cells by electron microscopy, with a special emphasis on the architecture of the nucleus. We propose that there is an ultrastructural signature of pluripotent human cells. hES cell nuclei lack heterochromatin, including the peripheral heterochromatin, that is common in most somatic cell types. The absence of peripheral heterochromatin may be related to the absence of lamins A and C, proteins important for linking chromatin to the nuclear lamina and envelope...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry
Songfang Wu, Shuang Pan, Liming Zhang, Joel Baines, Richard Roller, Joshua Ames, Mengmeng Yang, Jiyan Wang, Da Chen, Yaohui Liu, Cuizhu Zhang, Youjia Cao, Bin He
: Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) remodels nuclear membranes during virus egress. Although the UL31 and UL34 proteins control nucleocapsid transit in infected cells, the molecular interactions required for their function are unclear. Here we report that the γ134.5 gene product of HSV-1 facilitates nucleocapsid release to the cytoplasm through bridging the UL31/UL34 complex, cellular p32 and protein kinase C. Unlike wild type virus, an HSV mutant devoid of γ134.5 or its amino-terminus is crippled for viral growth and release...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Virology
Chiara Bellotti, Cristina Capanni, Giovanna Lattanzi, Davide Donati, Enrico Lucarelli, Serena Duchi
BACKGROUND: Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), during in vitro expansion, undergo a progressive loss of proliferative potential that leads to the senescent state, associated with a reduction of their "medicinal" properties. This may hampers their efficacy in the treatment of injured tissues. Quality controls on MSC-based cell therapy products should include an assessment of the senescent state. However, a reliable and specific marker is still missing. From studies on lamin-associated disorders, has emerged the correlation between defective lamin A maturation and cellular senescence...
2016: SpringerPlus
Luke Maishman, Samson O Obado, Sam Alsford, Jean-Mathieu Bart, Wei-Ming Chen, Alexander V Ratushny, Miguel Navarro, David Horn, John D Aitchison, Brian T Chait, Michael P Rout, Mark C Field
The nuclear lamina is a filamentous structure subtending the nuclear envelope and required for chromatin organization, transcriptional regulation and maintaining nuclear structure. The trypanosomatid coiled-coil NUP-1 protein is a lamina component functionally analogous to lamins, the major lamina proteins of metazoa. There is little evidence for shared ancestry, suggesting the presence of a distinct lamina system in trypanosomes. To find additional trypanosomatid lamina components we identified NUP-1 interacting proteins by affinity capture and mass-spectrometry...
September 12, 2016: Nucleic Acids Research
Su-Jin Lee, Youn-Sang Jung, Min-Ho Yoon, So-Mi Kang, Ah-Young Oh, Jee-Hyun Lee, So-Young Jun, Tae-Gyun Woo, Ho-Young Chun, Sang Kyum Kim, Kyu Jin Chung, Ho-Young Lee, Kyeong Lee, Guanghai Jin, Min-Kyun Na, Nam Chul Ha, Clea Bárcena, José M P Freije, Carlos López-Otín, Gyu Yong Song, Bum-Joon Park
Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disease that is caused by a silent mutation of the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C (lamin A/C). The G608G mutation generates a more accessible splicing donor site than does WT and produces an alternatively spliced product of LMNA called progerin, which is also expressed in normal aged cells. In this study, we determined that progerin binds directly to lamin A/C and induces profound nuclear aberrations. Given this observation, we performed a random screening of a chemical library and identified 3 compounds (JH1, JH4, and JH13) that efficiently block progerin-lamin A/C binding...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Jérôme D Robin, Frédérique Magdinier
Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains...
2016: Frontiers in Genetics
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"