Read by QxMD icon Read

Inhibitory neuron

Claudia Kathe, Thomas Haynes Hutson, Stephen Brendan McMahon, Lawrence David Falcon Moon
Brain and spinal injury reduce mobility and often impair sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord leading to spasticity. Here, we establish that complete transection of corticospinal pathways in the pyramids impairs locomotion and leads to increased spasms and excessive mono- and polysynaptic low threshold spinal reflexes in rats. Treatment of affected forelimb muscles with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) encoding human Neurotrophin-3 at a clinically-feasible time-point after injury reduced spasticity...
October 19, 2016: ELife
Miguel Hernández-Cerón, Juan Carlos Martínez-Lazcano, Carmen Rubio, Verónica Custodio, Edith González-Guevara, Carlos Castillo-Pérez, Carlos Paz
Lesions of the cerebellar dentate nucleus (DN) reduce the after-discharge duration induced by repetitive kindling stimulation and decrease seizures to a lower rank according to Racine's scale. The DN sends cholinergic and glutamatergic fibers to the red nucleus (RN), which is composed of glutamatergic and GABAergic cells. To test the participation of these neurotransmitters in seizures, we compared the levels of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at the RN in a control condition, a kindled stage, and a kindled stage followed by DN lesions...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Naiyan Chen, Hiroki Sugihara, Jinah Kim, Zhanyan Fu, Boaz Barak, Mriganka Sur, Guoping Feng, Weiping Han
Multiple hypothalamic neuronal populations that regulate energy balance have been identified. Although hypothalamic glia exist in abundance and form intimate structural connections with neurons, their roles in energy homeostasis are less known. Here we show that selective Ca(2+) activation of glia in the mouse arcuate nucleus (ARC) reversibly induces increased food intake while disruption of Ca(2+) signaling pathway in ARC glia reduces food intake. The specific activation of ARC glia enhances the activity of agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y (AgRP/NPY)-expressing neurons but induces no net response in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons...
October 18, 2016: ELife
Anthony Holtmaat, Pico Caroni
Learning and memory are associated with the formation and modification of neuronal assemblies: populations of neurons that encode what has been learned and mediate memory retrieval upon recall. Functional studies of neuronal assemblies have progressed dramatically thanks to recent technological advances. Here we discuss how a focus on assembly formation and consolidation has provided a powerful conceptual framework to relate mechanistic studies of synaptic and circuit plasticity to behaviorally relevant aspects of learning and memory...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Jérémie Barral, Alex D Reyes
The balance between excitation and inhibition (E-I balance) is maintained across brain regions though the network size, strength and number of synaptic connections, and connection architecture may vary substantially. We use a culture preparation to examine the homeostatic synaptic scaling rules that produce E-I balance and in vivo-like activity. We show that synaptic strength scales with the number of connections K as ∼ , close to the ideal theoretical value. Using optogenetic techniques, we delivered spatiotemporally patterned stimuli to neurons and confirmed key theoretical predictions: E-I balance is maintained, active decorrelation occurs and the spiking correlation increases with firing rate...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Mahua Chatterjee, Fernando Perez de Los Cobos Pallares, Alex Loebel, Michael Lukas, Veronica Egger
During odor sensing the activity of principal neurons of the mammalian olfactory bulb, the mitral and tufted cells (MTCs), occurs in repetitive bursts that are synchronized to respiration, reminiscent of hippocampal theta-gamma coupling. Axonless granule cells (GCs) mediate self- and lateral inhibitory interactions between the excitatory MTCs via reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses. We have explored long-term plasticity at this synapse by using a theta burst stimulation (TBS) protocol and variations thereof...
2016: Neural Plasticity
Rainer Engelken, Farzad Farkhooi, David Hansel, Carl van Vreeswijk, Fred Wolf
Neuronal activity in the central nervous system varies strongly in time and across neuronal populations. It is a longstanding proposal that such fluctuations generically arise from chaotic network dynamics. Various theoretical studies predict that the rich dynamics of rate models operating in the chaotic regime can subserve circuit computation and learning. Neurons in the brain, however, communicate via spikes and it is a theoretical challenge to obtain similar rate fluctuations in networks of spiking neuron models...
2016: F1000Research
Iryna Yavorska, Michael Wehr
Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM) inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles...
2016: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
Claire-Anne Gutekunst, Jack K Tung, Margaret E McDougal, Robert E Gross
Regrowth inhibitory molecules prevent axon regeneration in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS). RhoA, a small GTPase in the Rho family, is a key intracellular switch that mediates the effects of these extracellular regrowth inhibitors. The bacterial enzyme C3-ADP ribosyltransferase (C3) selectively and irreversibly inhibits the activation of RhoA and stimulates axon outgrowth and regeneration. However, effective intracellular delivery of the C3 protein in vivo is limited by poor cell permeability and a short duration of action...
October 13, 2016: Neuroscience
Keisuke Kaneko, Yuko Koyanagi, Yoshiyuki Oi, Masayuki Kobayashi
Propofol is a major intravenous anesthetic that facilitates GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic currents and modulates Ih, K(+), and voltage-gated Na(+) currents. This propofol-induced modulation of ionic currents changes intrinsic membrane properties and repetitive spike firing in cortical pyramidal neurons. However, it has been unknown whether propofol modulates these electrophysiological properties in GABAergic neurons, which express these ion channels at different levels. This study examined whether pyramidal and GABAergic neuronal properties are differentially modulated by propofol in the rat insular cortical slice preparation...
October 13, 2016: Neuroscience
Damien Benis, Olivier David, Brigitte Piallat, Astrid Kibleur, Laurent Goetz, Manik Bhattacharjee, Valérie Fraix, Eric Seigneuret, Paul Krack, Stéphan Chabardès, Julien Bastin
The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a critical role during action inhibition, perhaps by acting like a fast brake on the motor system when inappropriate responses have to be rapidly suppressed. However, the mechanisms involving the STN during motor inhibition are still unclear, particularly because of a relative lack of single-cell responses reported in this structure in humans. In this study, we used extracellular microelectrode recordings during deep brain stimulation surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to study STN neurophysiological correlates of inhibitory control during a stop signal task...
September 21, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Katarzyna Lebida, Jerzy W Mozrzymas
Experience and learning in adult primary somatosensory cortex are known to affect neuronal circuits by modifying both excitatory and inhibitory transmission. Synaptic plasticity phenomena provide a key substrate for cognitive processes, but precise description of the cellular and molecular correlates of learning is hampered by multiplicity of these mechanisms in various projections and in different types of neurons. Herein, we investigated the impact of associative learning on neuronal plasticity in distinct types of postsynaptic neurons by checking the impact of classical conditioning (pairing whisker stroking with tail shock) on the spike timing-dependent plasticity (t-LTP and t-LTD) in the layer IV to II/III vertical pathway of the mouse barrel cortex...
October 15, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Jatin Machhi, Navnit Prajapati, Ashutosh Tripathi, Zalak S Parikh, Ashish M Kanhed, Kirti Patel, Prakash P Pillai, Rajani Giridhar, Mange Ram Yadav
Excitotoxicty, a key pathogenic event is characteristic of the onset and development of neurodegeneration. The glutamatergic neurotransmission mediated through different glutamate receptor subtypes plays a pivotal role in the onset of excitotoxicity. The role of NMDA receptor (NMDAR), a glutamate receptor subtype, has been well established in the excitotoxicity pathogenesis. NMDAR overactivation triggers excessive calcium influx resulting in excitotoxic neuronal cell death. In the present study, a series of benzazepine derivatives, with the core structure of 3-methyltetrahydro-3H-benzazepin-2-one, were synthesised in our laboratory and their NMDAR antagonist activity was determined against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity using SH-SY5Y cells...
October 15, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Helena Soler, Jonatan Dorca-Arévalo, Marta González, Sara Esmeralda Rubio, Jesús Ávila, Eduardo Soriano, Marta Pascual
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia nowadays, has been linked to alterations in the septohippocampal pathway (SHP), among other circuits in the brain. In fact, the GABAergic component of the SHP, which controls hippocampal rhythmic activity crucial for learning and memory, is altered in the J20 mouse model of AD-a model that mimics the amyloid pathology of this disease. However, AD is characterized by another pathophysiological hallmark: the hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau...
September 15, 2016: Neurobiology of Aging
Jiani Yin, Christian P Schaaf
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) a highly heritable, clinically diverse group of neurodevelopmental disorders. Its genetic heterogeneity is remarkable, with more than 800 ASD predisposition genes identified to date. They are involved in various biological processes, including chromatin remodeling and gene transcription regulation, cell growth and proliferation, ubiquitination, and neuronal-specific processes, such as synaptic organization and activity, dendritic morphology and axonogenesis. This review aims to discuss basic autism genetics, ways to investigate ASD in model systems, highlight some key genes and their molecular pathways, and introduce novel theories of ASD pathogenesis, such as imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory brain activity, oligogenic heterozygosity, and the female protective model...
October 15, 2016: Prenatal Diagnosis
Astra S Bryant, Anna K Greenwood, Scott A Juntti, Allie E Byrne, Russell D Fernald
Dopamine regulates reproduction in part by modulating neuronal activity within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Previous studies suggested numerous mechanisms by which dopamine exerts inhibitory control over the HPG axis, ultimately changing the levels of sex steroids that regulate reproductive behaviors. However, it is not known whether these mechanisms are conserved across vertebrate species. In particular, it is unknown whether mechanisms underlying dopaminergic control of reproduction are shared between mammals and teleost fish...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Experimental Biology
Nelly Redolfi, Luisa Galla, Andrea Maset, Luca Murru, Eleonora Savoia, Ilaria Zamparo, Angela Gritti, Pierre Billuart, Maria Passafaro, Claudia Lodovichi
Among the X-linked genes associated to intellectual disability, Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1) encodes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein, a key regulator of several developmental processes, such as dendrite and spine formation and synaptic activity. Inhibitory interneurons play a key role in the development and function of neuronal circuits. Whether mutation of OPHN1 can affect morphology and synaptic properties of inhibitory interneurons remains poorly understood. To address these open questions, we studied in a well established mouse model of X-linked intellectual disability, i...
October 13, 2016: Human Molecular Genetics
Youn Yi Jo, Ji Yeon Lee, Chul-Kyu Park
The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is expressed in primary sensory neurons and is commonly regarded as a "pain" neurotransmitter. Upon peripheral inflammation, SP activates the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and potentiates activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is coexpressed by nociceptive neurons. Therefore, SP functions as an important neurotransmitter involved in the hypersensitization of inflammatory pain. Resolvin E1 (RvE1), derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, inhibits TRPV1 activity via activation of the chemerin 23 receptor (ChemR23)-an RvE1 receptor located in dorsal root ganglion neurons-and therefore exerts an inhibitory effect on inflammatory pain...
2016: Mediators of Inflammation
Jacob Kjell, Lars Olson
A long-standing goal of spinal cord injury research is to develop effective spinal cord repair strategies for the clinic. Rat models of spinal cord injury provide an important mammalian model in which to evaluate treatment strategies and to understand the pathological basis of spinal cord injuries. These models have facilitated the development of robust tests for assessing the recovery of locomotor and sensory functions. Rat models have also allowed us to understand how neuronal circuitry changes following spinal cord injury and how recovery could be promoted by enhancing spontaneous regenerative mechanisms and by counteracting intrinsic inhibitory factors...
October 1, 2016: Disease Models & Mechanisms
Idan Elbaz, David Zada, Adi Tovin, Tslil Braun, Tali Lerer-Goldshtein, Gordon Wang, Philippe Mourrain, Lior Appelbaum
Sleep is tightly regulated by the circadian clock and homeostatic mechanisms. Although the sleep/wake cycle is known to be associated with structural and physiological synaptic changes that benefit the brain, the function of sleep is still debated. The hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) neurons regulate various functions including feeding, reward, sleep, and wake. Continuous imaging of single neuronal circuits in live animals is vital to understanding the role of sleep in regulating synaptic dynamics, and the transparency of the zebrafish model enables time-lapse imaging of single synapses during both day and night...
October 12, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"