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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28449081/the-coxiella-burnetii-type-ivb-secretion-system-t4bss-component-dota-is-released-secreted-during-infection-of-host-cells-and-during-in-vitro-growth-in-a-t4bss-dependent-manner
#1
Brandon E Luedtke, Saugata Mahapatra, Erika I Lutter, Edward I Shaw
Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen and is the causative agent of the zoonotic disease Q-fever. To cause disease, C. burnetii requires a functional type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) to transfer effector proteins required for the establishment and maintenance of a membrane bound parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and further modulation of host cell process. However, it is not clear how the T4BSS interacts with the PV membrane since neither a secretion pilus nor an extracellular pore forming apparatus has not been described...
April 25, 2017: Pathogens and Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28448211/prevalence-and-geographic-distribution-of-vector-borne-pathogens-in-apparently-healthy-dogs-in-croatia
#2
Vladimir Mrljak, Josipa Kuleš, Željko Mihaljević, Marin Torti, Jelena Gotić, Martina Crnogaj, Tatjana Živičnjak, Iva Mayer, Iva Šmit, Mangesh Bhide, Renata Barić Rafaj
Vector-borne pathogens (VBPs) are a group of globally extended and quickly spreading pathogens that are transmitted by various arthropod vectors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the seroprevalence against Babesia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Croatia. We investigated 435 randomly selected apparently healthy dogs in 13 different locations of Croatia for antibodies to B. canis by indirect immunofluorescence using a commercial IFA IgG Antibody Kit...
April 27, 2017: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28443235/seronegative-complicated-hydatid-cyst-of-the-lung-a-case-report
#3
Eva Letty Susanne Engström, Goran Nadir Salih, Lothar Wiese
Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important helminthic zoonotic disease that commonly affects the liver and lungs. Imaging methods and serology establish the diagnosis in most cases. Chest x-ray can diagnose uncomplicated pulmonary hydatid cysts, whereas superinfection and/or rupture of the hydatid cyst (complicated cysts) may change the radiographic appearance and lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. We report the case of a patient with hemoptysis and chest pain, where computer tomography scan of the lung suggested a large, ruptured hydatid cyst...
2017: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28443226/a-novel-pcr-assay-for-detecting-brucella-abortus-and-brucella-melitensis
#4
Saeed Alamian, Majid Esmaelizad, Taghi Zahraei, Afshar Etemadi, Mohsen Mohammadi, Davoud Afshar, Soheila Ghaderi
OBJECTIVES: Brucellosis is a major zoonotic disease that poses a significant public health threat worldwide. The classical bacteriological detection process used to identify Brucella spp. is difficult and time-consuming. This study aimed to develop a novel molecular assay for detecting brucellosis. METHODS: All complete sequences of chromosome 1 with 2.1-Mbp lengths were compared among all available Brucella sequences. A unique repeat sequence (URS) locus on chromosome 1 could differentiate Brucella abortus from Brucella melitensis...
February 2017: Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28443081/helicobacter-pullorum-an-emerging-zoonotic-pathogen
#5
REVIEW
Sundus Javed, Farzana Gul, Kashaf Javed, Habib Bokhari
Helicobacter pullorum (H.pullorum) commonly colonizes the gastrointestinal tract of poultry causing gastroenteritis. The bacterium may be transmitted to humans through contaminated meat where it has been associated with colitis and hepatitis. Despite the high prevalence of H. pullorum observed in poultry, little is known about the mechanisms by which this bacterium establishes infection in host and its virulence determinants. In this article we aim to provide an overview of this emerging zoonotic pathogen; its general characteristics, hosts, prevalence, and transmission as well as its pathogenic potential...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28442665/the-amino-acid-at-position-624-in-the-glycoprotein-of-sftsv-severe-fever-with-thrombocytopenia-virus-plays-a-critical-role-in-low-ph-dependent-cell-fusion-activity
#6
Yoshimi Tsuda, Manabu Igarashi, Ryo Ito, Sanae Nishio, Kenta Shimizu, Kumiko Yoshimatsu, Jiro Arikawa
Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a novel phlebovirus responsible for causing an emerging zoonotic disease. We previously established subclones from SFTSV strain YG1 based on differences in low-pH-dependent cell fusion activities and found two amino acid substitutions, Y328H and R624W, in the envelope glycoprotein (GP) of high fusion subclones. In this study, we show that transiently expressed GP with the R624W mutation, but not the Y328H mutation, induced cell fusion under acidic conditions...
2017: Biomedical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438980/host-and-bacterial-factors-control-susceptibility-of-drosophila-melanogaster-to-coxiella-burnetii-infection
#7
Reginaldo G Bastos, Zachary P Howard, Aoi Hiroyasu, Alan G Goodman
Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Q fever, a zoonotic disease that threatens both human and animal health. Due to the paucity of experimental animal models, little is known about how host factors interface with bacterial components and affect pathogenesis. Here we used Drosophila melanogaster, in conjunction with the BSL2 Nine Mile phase II (NMII) clone 4 strain of C. burnetii, as a model to investigate host and bacterial components implicated in infection. We demonstrated that adult Drosophila are susceptible to C...
April 24, 2017: Infection and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438920/conservation-of-biodiversity-as-a-strategy-for-improving-human-health-and-well-being
#8
REVIEW
A Marm Kilpatrick, Daniel J Salkeld, Georgia Titcomb, Micah B Hahn
The Earth's ecosystems have been altered by anthropogenic processes, including land use, harvesting populations, species introductions and climate change. These anthropogenic processes greatly alter plant and animal communities, thereby changing transmission of the zoonotic pathogens they carry. Biodiversity conservation may be a potential win-win strategy for maintaining ecosystem health and protecting public health, yet the causal evidence to support this strategy is limited. Evaluating conservation as a viable public health intervention requires answering four questions: (i) Is there a general and causal relationship between biodiversity and pathogen transmission, and if so, which direction is it in? (ii) Does increased pathogen diversity with increased host biodiversity result in an increase in total disease burden? (iii) Do the net benefits of biodiversity conservation to human well-being outweigh the benefits that biodiversity-degrading activities, such as agriculture and resource utilization, provide? (iv) Are biodiversity conservation interventions cost-effective when compared to other options employed in standard public health approaches? Here, we summarize current knowledge on biodiversity-zoonotic disease relationships and outline a research plan to address the gaps in our understanding for each of these four questions...
June 5, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438918/does-the-impact-of-biodiversity-differ-between-emerging-and-endemic-pathogens-the-need-to-separate-the-concepts-of-hazard-and-risk
#9
REVIEW
Parviez R Hosseini, James N Mills, Anne-Hélène Prieur-Richard, Vanessa O Ezenwa, Xavier Bailly, Annapaola Rizzoli, Gerardo Suzán, Marion Vittecoq, Gabriel E García-Peña, Peter Daszak, Jean-François Guégan, Benjamin Roche
Biodiversity is of critical value to human societies, but recent evidence that biodiversity may mitigate infectious-disease risk has sparked controversy among researchers. The majority of work on this topic has focused on direct assessments of the relationship between biodiversity and endemic-pathogen prevalence, without disentangling intervening mechanisms; thus study outcomes often differ, fuelling more debate. Here, we suggest two critical changes to the approach researchers take to understanding relationships between infectious disease, both endemic and emerging, and biodiversity that may help clarify sources of controversy...
June 5, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438915/conservation-development-and-the-management-of-infectious-disease-avian-influenza-in-china-2004-2012
#10
Tong Wu, Charles Perrings
There is growing evidence that wildlife conservation measures have mixed effects on the emergence and spread of zoonotic disease. Wildlife conservation has been found to have both positive (dilution) and negative (contagion) effects. In the case of avian influenza H5N1 in China, the focus has been on negative effects. Lakes and wetlands attracting migrating waterfowl have been argued to be disease hotspots. We consider the implications of waterfowl conservation for H5N1 infections in both poultry and humans between 2004 and 2012...
June 5, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438912/effects-of-conservation-management-of-landscapes-and-vertebrate-communities-on-lyme-borreliosis-risk-in-the-united-kingdom
#11
REVIEW
Caroline Millins, Lucy Gilbert, Jolyon Medlock, Kayleigh Hansford, Des Ba Thompson, Roman Biek
Landscape change and altered host abundance are major drivers of zoonotic pathogen emergence. Conservation and biodiversity management of landscapes and vertebrate communities can have secondary effects on vector-borne pathogen transmission that are important to assess. Here we review the potential implications of these activities on the risk of Lyme borreliosis in the United Kingdom. Conservation management activities include woodland expansion, management and restoration, deer management, urban greening and the release and culling of non-native species...
June 5, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438910/lyme-disease-ecology-in-a-changing-world-consensus-uncertainty-and-critical-gaps-for-improving-control
#12
REVIEW
A Marm Kilpatrick, Andrew D M Dobson, Taal Levi, Daniel J Salkeld, Andrea Swei, Howard S Ginsberg, Anne Kjemtrup, Kerry A Padgett, Per M Jensen, Durland Fish, Nick H Ogden, Maria A Diuk-Wasser
Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in temperate regions of North America, Europe and Asia, and the number of reported cases has increased in many regions as landscapes have been altered. Although there has been extensive work on the ecology and epidemiology of this disease in both Europe and North America, substantial uncertainty exists about fundamental aspects that determine spatial and temporal variation in both disease risk and human incidence, which hamper effective and efficient prevention and control...
June 5, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438909/interacting-effects-of-land-use-and-climate-on-rodent-borne-pathogens-in-central-kenya
#13
Hillary S Young, Douglas J McCauley, Rodolfo Dirzo, Charles L Nunn, Michael G Campana, Bernard Agwanda, Erik R Otarola-Castillo, Eric R Castillo, Robert M Pringle, Kari E Veblen, Daniel J Salkeld, Kristin Stewardson, Robert Fleischer, Eric F Lambin, Todd M Palmer, Kristofer M Helgen
Understanding the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on zoonotic disease risk is both a critical conservation objective and a public health priority. Here, we evaluate the effects of multiple forms of anthropogenic disturbance across a precipitation gradient on the abundance of pathogen-infected small mammal hosts in a multi-host, multi-pathogen system in central Kenya. Our results suggest that conversion to cropland and wildlife loss alone drive systematic increases in rodent-borne pathogen prevalence, but that pastoral conversion has no such systematic effects...
June 5, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438141/prevalence-of-toxocara-antibodies-among-patients-clinically-suspected-to-have-ocular-toxocariasis-a-retrospective-descriptive-study-in-sri-lanka
#14
Devika Iddawela, Kiruthiha Ehambaram, Pemindra Bandara
BACKGROUND: Human toxocariasis, caused by Toxocara canis, T. cati, and T. vitulorum of dogs, cats and ruminants respectively, is recognized as an important zoonotic infection worldwide. The typical clinical syndromes of toxocariasis in humans are ocular larva migrans (OLM) and visceral larva migrans (VLM). The most commonly affected sites of OLM are the peripheral retina and/or vitreous humor. In Sri Lanka, there is a dearth of information on prevalence of ocular infection in our population...
April 24, 2017: BMC Ophthalmology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438095/arcobacter-an-emerging-food-borne-zoonotic-pathogen-its-public-health-concerns-and-advances-in-diagnosis-and-control-a-comprehensive-review
#15
Thadiyam Puram Ramees, Kuldeep Dhama, Kumaragurubaran Karthik, Ramswaroop Singh Rathore, Ashok Kumar, Mani Saminathan, Ruchi Tiwari, Yashpal Singh Malik, Raj Kumar Singh
Arcobacter has emerged as an important food-borne zoonotic pathogen, causing sometimes serious infections in humans and animals. Newer species of Arcobacter are being incessantly emerging (presently 25 species have been identified) with novel information on the evolutionary mechanisms and genetic diversity among different Arcobacter species. These have been reported from chickens, domestic animals (cattle, pigs, sheep, horses, dogs), reptiles (lizards, snakes and chelonians), meat (poultry, pork, goat, lamb, beef, rabbit), vegetables and from humans in different countries...
April 25, 2017: Veterinary Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438088/anaplasma-ehrlichia-and-rickettsia-species-infections-in-cats
#16
Maria Grazia Pennisi, Regina Hofmann-Lehmann, Alan D Radford, Séverine Tasker, Sándor Belák, Diane D Addie, Corine Boucraut-Baralon, Herman Egberink, Tadeusz Frymus, Tim Gruffydd-Jones, Katrin Hartmann, Marian C Horzinek, Margaret J Hosie, Albert Lloret, Hans Lutz, Fulvio Marsilio, Etienne Thiry, Uwe Truyen, Karin Möstl
Anaplasma species, Ehrlichia species and Rickettsia species are vector-borne pathogens infecting a wide variety of mammals, but causing disease in very few of them. Infection in cats: Anaplasma phagocytophilum is the most important feline pathogen among these rickettsial organisms, and coinfections are possible. Little information is available on the pathogenesis of these agents in cats. Clinical signs are usually reported soon after tick infestation. They are mostly non-specific, consisting of fever, anorexia and lethargy...
May 2017: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28437186/leptospira-species-in-feral-cats-and-black-rats-from-western-australia-and-christmas-island
#17
Narelle A Dybing, Caroline Jacobson, Peter Irwin, David Algar, Peter J Adams
Leptospirosis is a neglected, re-emerging bacterial disease with both zoonotic and conservation implications. Rats and livestock are considered the usual sources of human infection, but all mammalian species are capable of carrying Leptospira spp. and transmitting pathogenic leptospires in their urine, and uncertainty remains about the ecology and transmission dynamics of Leptospira in different regions. In light of a recent case of human leptospirosis on tropical Christmas Island, this study aimed to investigate the role of introduced animals (feral cats and black rats) as carriers of pathogenic Leptospira spp...
May 2017: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435679/targeting-the-pro-inflammatory-factor-ccl2-mcp-1-with-bindarit-for-influenza-a-h7n9-treatment
#18
Stefan Wolf, Scott Johnson, Olivia Perwitasari, Suresh Mahalingam, Ralph A Tripp
Influenza A viruses are important human and animal pathogens. Seasonal influenza viruses cause infections every year, and occasionally zoonotic viruses emerge to cause pandemics with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates. Three cases of laboratory confirmed human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were reported in 2013, and there have been several cases reported across South East Asia, and recently in North America. Most patients experience severe respiratory illness, with mortality rates approaching 40%...
March 2017: Clinical & Translational Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433410/echinococcus-oligarthrus-in-the-subtropical-region-of-argentina-first-integration-of-morphological-and-molecular-analyses-determines-two-distinct-populations
#19
Juan Pablo Arrabal, Hector Gabriel Avila, Maria Romina Rivero, Federico Camicia, Martin Miguel Salas, Sebastián A Costa, Carlos G Nocera, Mara C Rosenzvit, Laura Kamenetzky
Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis that is considered as a neglected disease by the World Health Organization. The species Echinococcus oligarthrus is one of the causative agents of Neotropical echinococcosis, which is a poorly understood disease that requires a complex medical examination, may threaten human life, and is frequently associated with a low socioeconomic status. Morphological and genetic diversity in E. oligarthrus remains unknown. The aim of this work is to identify and characterize E. oligarthrus infections in sylvatic animals from the Upper Paraná Atlantic Forest in the province of Misiones, Argentina, by following an integrative approach that links morphological, genetic and ecological aspects...
March 27, 2017: Veterinary Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431787/-campylobacter-jejuni-o-19-serotype-in-argentine-poultry-meat-supply-chain
#20
Eugenia Rossler, Estefanía M Fuhr, Guillermina Lorenzón, Analía Romero-Scharpen, Ayelén P Berisvil, Jesica E Blajman, Diego M Astesana, Jorge A Zimmermann, Marcia L Fusari, Marcelo L Signorini, Lorena P Soto, Laureano S Frizzo, María V Zbrun
Thermotolerant species of Campylobacter have been focus of attention in the last years because they are the major agent causing zoonotic foodborne diseases. In addition, Campylobacter jejuni O:19 serotype was associated with Guillain Barré syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of C. jejuni O:19 serotype isolated at different stages of three poultry meat supply chain in Santa Fe, Argentina. The analysis showed that 18% of isolated C. jejuni belong to serotype O:19. It was also determined that the presence of these strains is given in almost all production stages...
April 18, 2017: Revista Argentina de Microbiología
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