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Innovation leadership

Roberta L Woodgate, Melanie Zurba, Pauline Tennent
Plain English summary: The involvement of patients in health research has resulted in the development of more effective interventions and policies in healthcare that respond to the needs of healthcare users. This article examines how working with youth and their families as co-researchers in health research communities of practice (CoPs), rather than just as participants, can benefit all involved. Health research (CoPs) promote an environment in which co-researchers have the opportunity to do more than just participate in the data collection phase of the research process...
2018: Research Involvement and Engagement
Luciano Rossetti
Luciano Rossetti, MD, Executive Vice President, Global Head of R&D at Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany speaks to Laura Dormer, Commissioning Editor Luciano Rossetti, MD, is Executive Vice President, Global Head of R&D at Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, and a member of the Healthcare Executive Committee. As Global Head of R&D, Rossetti leads the strategy for Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany's discovery and development efforts in healthcare. He joined Merck KGaA in July 2014, and has since led the acceleration of several key programs through the pipeline and advanced the innovation of Merck KGaA's discovery teams into development...
March 20, 2018: Neurodegenerative Disease Management
Sarah E Ali-Khan, Antoine Jean, Emily MacDonald, E Richard Gold
Mounting evidence indicates that worldwide, innovation systems are increasing unsustainable. Equally, concerns about inequities in the science and innovation process, and in access to its benefits, continue. Against a backdrop of growing health, economic and scientific challenges global stakeholders are urgently seeking to spur innovation and maximize the just distribution of benefits for all. Open Science collaboration (OS) - comprising a variety of approaches to increase open, public, and rapid mobilization of scientific knowledge - is seen to be one of the most promising ways forward...
2018: MNI Open Res
Janya McCalman, Roxanne Bainbridge, Catherine Brown, Komla Tsey, Adele Clarke
Introduction: Spreading proven or promising Aboriginal health programs and implementing them in new settings can make cost-effective contributions to a range of Aboriginal Australian development, health and wellbeing, and educational outcomes. Studies have theorized the implementation of Aboriginal health programs but have not focused explicitly on the conditions that influenced their spread. This study examined the broader political, institutional, social and economic conditions that influenced negotiations to transfer, implement, adapt, and sustain one Aboriginal empowerment program-the Family Wellbeing (FWB) program-to at least 60 geographical sites across Australia over 24 years...
2018: Frontiers in Public Health
Elizabeth Wilmerding, Mari Knuth-Bouracee, Jeffrey L Edleson
This article offers reflections on the article "Bystander Training as Leadership Training: Notes on the Origins, Philosophy and Pedagogy of the Mentors in Violence Prevention Model" by Jackson Katz in this issue of Violence Against Women. The authors rely on their unique perspectives in varying roles at the University of California (UC) Berkeley, as well as on relevant social science and social justice research. The article explores five themes of violence prevention and anti-oppression work: leadership, social justice, gender identity, issues of identity and status, and diffusion of innovation...
March 1, 2018: Violence Against Women
Jacqueline Counts, Rebecca Gillam, Teri A Garstka, Ember Urbach
The challenge of maximizing the well-being of children, youth, and families is recognizing that change occurs within complex social systems. Organizations dedicated to improving practice, advancing knowledge, and informing policy for the betterment of all must have the right approach, structure, and personnel to work in these complex systems. The University of Kansas Center for Public Partnerships and Research cultivates a portfolio of innovation, research, and data science approaches positioned to help move social service fields locally, regionally, and nationally...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Evidence-informed Social Work
Judy C Lentz
Although the specialty of palliative nursing and palliative care continues to grow in hospital and outpatient settings, a paucity of home-based palliative services remains. This article discusses a new paradigm of faith-based palliative care ministry using faith community nurses (FCNs). Under the leadership of a palliative care doula (a nurse expert in palliative care), nurses in the faith community can offer critical support to those with serious illness. Models such as this provide stimulating content for FCN practice and opportunity to broaden health ministry within faith communities...
April 2018: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Susan Y Friedman, Mitchell T Rabkin
Hospital boards address quality of care and patient safety as well as financial performance through long-accepted practices. By contrast, a hospital's administrative operations and institutional culture are not usually subject to such detailed scrutiny. Yet, despite a healthy bottom line and patient commendations, hospital personnel can be underperforming, burdened with poor morale, and suffering from less than optimal leadership, unwarranted inefficiency, and ethically questionable management practices. The resulting employee dissatisfaction or disengagement can affect productivity, quality, turnover, innovation, patient and donor attraction and retention, public image, etc...
March 6, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Barbara G Bokhour, Gemmae M Fix, Nora M Mueller, Anna M Barker, Sherri L Lavela, Jennifer N Hill, Jeffrey L Solomon, Carol VanDeusen Lukas
BACKGROUND: Healthcare organizations increasingly are focused on providing care which is patient-centered rather than disease-focused. Yet little is known about how best to transform the culture of care in these organizations. We sought to understand key organizational factors for implementing patient-centered care cultural transformation through an examination of efforts in the US Department of Veterans Affairs. METHODS: We conducted multi-day site visits at four US Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers designated as leaders in providing patient-centered care...
March 7, 2018: BMC Health Services Research
Prisca A Oria, Michiel Wijnands, Jane Alaii, Cees Leeuwis
BACKGROUND: In 2012, a donor-supported proof of principle study was launched to eliminate malaria from Rusinga Island, western Kenya, using solar-powered mosquito trapping systems (SMoTS). SMoTS, which also provided power for room lighting and charging mobile telephones, were installed in houses. In view of the involvement of individual and collective benefits, as well as individual and collective maintenance solutions, this study qualitatively examined preferences of some project stakeholders towards SMoTS sustainability components to see if and how they related to social dilemma factors...
March 6, 2018: BMC Public Health
Karen E Pinder, Jennifer A Shabbits
BACKGROUND: The past decade has witnessed successful expansion, distribution and curricular renewal at the University of British Columbia (UBC) medical school. The expansion and distribution of the medical program doubled enrollment and established the first North American medical school training students across multiple geographical locations. The more recent competency-based curriculum renewal demonstrates sustained innovation within UBC medicine. AIMS: This paper describes that a significant contributor to these successes has been a team of teaching faculty whose exclusive roles have been providing curricular support...
March 5, 2018: Medical Teacher
Mia-Riitta Lehtonen, Mervi Roos, Kati Kantanen, Tarja Suominen
The aim of this research was to describe nurse managers' leadership and management competencies (NMLMC) from the perspective of nursing personnel. Nurse managers are responsible for the management of the largest professional group in social and health care. The assessment of NMLMC is needed because of their powerful influence on organizational effectiveness. An electronic survey was conducted among the nursing personnel (n = 166) of 1 Finnish hospital in spring 2016. Nursing personnel assessed their manager using a NMLMC scale consisting of general and special competences...
April 2018: Nursing Administration Quarterly
Lindsay M Wodinski, Heather M Mattson McCrady, Christie M Oswald, Nicole J M Lyste, Karen L L Forbes
This paper presents family bedside orientations, an innovative bedside peer support model for families of paediatric patients piloted in one unit at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta. The model invites family members of former patients back to the hospital as volunteer peer mentors responsible for meeting one-on-one with current inpatient families to provide a listening presence, discuss patient safety practices and encourage families to participate in their child's care. Using qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, the model was evaluated over 1 year (December 2014 to December 2015)...
October 2017: Paediatrics & Child Health
Bridget Johnston, Anne Patterson, Lydia Bird, Eleanor Wilson, Kathryn Almack, Gillian Mathews, Jane Seymour
BACKGROUND: The Midhurst Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care at Home Service was founded in 2006 to improve community-based palliative care provision. Principal components include; early referral; home-based clinical interventions; close partnership working; and flexible teamwork. Following a successful introduction, the model was implemented in six further sites across England. This article reports a mixed methods evaluation of the implementation across these 'Innovation Centres'. The evaluation aimed to assess the process and impact on staff, patients and carers of providing Macmillan Specialist Care at Home services across the six sites...
February 23, 2018: BMC Palliative Care
Echezona E Ezeanolue, William Nii Ayitey Menson, Dina Patel, Gregory Aarons, Ayodotun Olutola, Michael Obiefune, Patrick Dakum, Prosper Okonkwo, Bola Gobir, Timothy Akinmurele, Anthea Nwandu, Hadiza Khamofu, Bolanle Oyeledun, Muyiwa Aina, Andy Eyo, Obinna Oleribe, Ikoedem Ibanga, John Oko, Chukwuma Anyaike, John Idoko, Muktar H Aliyu, Rachel Sturke
BACKGROUND: Despite being disproportionately burdened by preventable diseases than more advanced countries, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) continue to trail behind other parts of the world in the number, quality and impact of scholarly activities by their health researchers. Our strategy at the Nigerian Implementation Science Alliance (NISA) is to utilise innovative platforms that catalyse collaboration, enhance communication between different stakeholders, and promote the uptake of evidence-based interventions in improving healthcare delivery...
February 12, 2018: Health Research Policy and Systems
Martsolf Grant, Mason Diana J, Sloan Jennifer, Sullivan Cheryl G, Villarruel Antonia M
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) recently made a commitment to advancing a national culture of health (COH)-an action framework developed by RWJF that focuses on well-being and equity with the goal of empowering and supporting people to lead healthier lives where they live, learn, work, and play, now and in generations to come. Nurses are well positioned to provide care that is consistent with, and contributes to, a COH in their communities. RWJF contracted with the American Academy of Nursing (the Academy) with a subcontract to the RAND Corporation to explore the ways that innovative nurse-designed models of care are currently advancing a COH...
January 2018: Rand Health Quarterly
Jessie Williams
What does it take to light a fire to create cultural change about the way we do death, dying and bereavement in Australia? The GroundSwell Project set out to embark on a bold journey to create cultural change in the death and dying space in Australia. For 7 years we have delivered over 55 arts/health projects and have punched well above our weight. What have we learned about change and innovation? We've learned that we had to set up a fiercely independent organisation, drawing on short term funding so that we were never locked into delivering results that perpetuated 'systemic malaise'...
January 2018: Annals of Palliative Medicine
J Brian Cassel, Brynn Bowman, Maggie Rogers, Lynn H Spragens, Diane E Meier
Between 2000 and 2015 the proportion of US hospitals with more than fifty beds that had palliative care programs tripled, from 25 percent to 75 percent. The rapid adoption of this high-value program, which is voluntary and runs counter to the dominant culture in US hospitals, was catalyzed by tens of millions of dollars in philanthropic support for innovation, dissemination, and professionalization in the palliative care field. We describe the dissemination strategies of the Center to Advance Palliative Care in the context of the principles of social entrepreneurship, and we provide an in-depth look at its hallmark training initiative, Palliative Care Leadership Centers...
February 2018: Health Affairs
Alan D Hecht, Aaron Ferster, Kevin Summers
When the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established nearly 50 years ago, the nation faced serious threats to its air, land, and water, which in turn impacted human health. These threats were effectively addressed by the creation of EPA (in 1970) and many subsequent landmark environmental legislations which in turn significantly reduced threats to the Nation's environment and public health. A key element of historic legislation is research aimed at dealing with current and future problems. Today we face national and global challenges that go beyond classic media-specific (air, land, water) environmental legislation and require an integrated paradigm of action and engagement based on (1) innovation based on science and technology, (2) stakeholder engagement and collaboration, and (3) public education and support...
October 16, 2017: Jacobs J Environ Sci
Kathryn von Treuer, Gery Karantzas, Marita McCabe, David Mellor, Anastasia Konis, Tanya E Davison, Daniel O'Connor
BACKGROUND: Organizational change is inevitable in any workplace. Previous research has shown that leadership and a number of organizational climate and contextual variables can affect the adoption of change initiatives. The effect of these workplace variables is particularly important in stressful work sectors such as aged care where employees work with challenging older clients who frequently exhibit dementia and depression. METHODS: This study sought to examine the effect of organizational climate and leadership variables on organizational readiness for change across 21 residential aged care facilities...
February 1, 2018: BMC Health Services Research
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