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Animal Cognition

Shannon C Agner, Robyn S Klein
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are known to acutely cause pathology in the form of cytokine-mediated neural tissue damage and inflammation, the pathophysiology of neurologic sequelae after viral clearance is incompletely understood. RECENT FINDINGS: Alterations in microglial and glial biology in response to initial infiltration of immune cells that persist within the CNS have recently been shown to promote neuronal dysfunction and cognitive deficits in animal models of viral encephalitis...
March 19, 2018: Current Opinion in Neurology
Monica H Breitve, Luiza J Chwiszczuk, Kolbjørn Brønnick, Minna J Hynninen, Bjørn H Auestad, Dag Aarsland, Arvid Rongve
Introduction: There are relatively few longitudinal studies on the differences in cognitive decline between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and the majority of existing studies have suboptimal designs. Aim: We investigated the differences in cognitive decline in AD compared to DLB over 4 years and cognitive domain predictors of progression. Methods: In a longitudinal study, 266 patients with first-time diagnosis of mild dementia were included and followed annually...
2018: Frontiers in Neurology
Xing Zhang, Guangming Ran, Wenjian Xu, Yuanxiao Ma, Xu Chen
Humans are highly social animals, and the ability to cater to the preferences of other individuals is encouraged by society. Preference-inferring is an important aspect of the theory of mind (TOM). Many previous studies have shown that attachment style is closely related to TOM ability. However, little is known about the effects of adult attachment style on preferences inferring under different levels of certainty. Here, we investigated how adult attachment style affects neural activity underlying preferences inferred under different levels of certainty by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Jessica Alber, Kelly McGarry, Richard B Noto, Peter J Snyder
Background: Recent genome-wide association screening (GWAS) studies have linked Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology to gene networks that regulate immune function. Kan et al. recently reported that Arg1 (an anti-inflammatory gene that codes for arginase-1) is expressed in parts of the brain associated with amyloidosis prior to the onset of neuronal loss, suggesting that chronic brain arginine deprivation promotes AD-related neuropathology. They blocked arginine catabolism in their mouse AD model by administration of eflornithine (DFMO) to juvenile animals, effectively blocking the expression of AD-related amyloid pathology as the mice aged...
2018: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Amanda Rodrigues Vieira, Nayara Salles, Marco Borges, Theo Mota
For more than a century, visual learning and memory has been studied in the honeybee Apis mellifera using operant appetitive conditioning. Although honeybees show impressive visual learning capacities in this well-established protocol, operant training of free-flying animals can hardly be combined with invasive protocols for studying the neurobiological basis of visual learning. In view of that, different efforts have been made to develop new classical conditioning protocols for studying visual learning in harnessed honeybees, though learning performances remain considerably poorer than those obtained in free-flying animals...
March 20, 2018: Journal of Experimental Biology
Karem H Alzoubi, Omar F Khabour, Mohammad Ahmad
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling prevalent and difficult-to-treat psychiatric disorder, which can develop after the exposure to severe traumatic events such as those occurring during wars and natural disasters. Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a potent antioxidant, which has an important role in prevention of cognitive dysfunctions. In the present study, the effect of PTX on memory impairment induced by PTSD was investigated using the rat animal model. PTSD-like behavior was induced in animals using a single-prolonged stress (SPS) rat model of PTSD (2 h restrain, 20 min forced swimming, 15 min rest, 1-2 min diethyl ether exposure)...
March 17, 2018: Brain Research Bulletin
Ozge Selin Cevik, Leyla Sahin, Lulufer Tamer
AIM: The type and duration of exposure to stress is an important influence on emotional and cognitive functions. Learning is the adaptive response of the central nervous system that occurs in hippocampus which affects from environmental factors like exercise. In this study, we investigated effects of long term treadmill exercise on learning and behavior on chronic social isolated rat. MAIN METHODS: Male Wistar rats (n = 32) randomly assigned into four groups: control, exercised, social isolation, social isolation + exercise during postnatal days (PNDs) 21-34...
March 17, 2018: Life Sciences
Nikita M Bajwa, Chandrasekhar Kesavan, Subburaman Mohan
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to long-term cognitive, behavioral, affective deficits, and increase neurodegenerative diseases. It is only in recent years that there is growing awareness that TBI even in its milder form poses long-term health consequences to not only the brain but to other organ systems. Also, the concept that hormonal signals and neural circuits that originate in the hypothalamus play key roles in regulating skeletal system is gaining recognition based on recent mouse genetic studies. Accordingly, many TBI patients have also presented with hormonal dysfunction, increased skeletal fragility, and increased risk of skeletal diseases...
2018: Frontiers in Neurology
Francesca Pistollato, Ruben Calderón Iglesias, Roberto Ruiz, Silvia Aparicio, Jorge Crespo, Luis Dzul Lopez, Piera Pia Manna, Francesca Giampieri, Maurizio Battino
Ample epidemiological evidence suggests a strong correlation among diet, lifestyle factors and the onset and consolidation of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been demonstrated that AD, diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular disease are strongly interconnected pathologies. Preventive strategies and nutritional interventions seem to be promising approaches to delay neurocognitive decline and reduce the risk of AD and other non-psychiatric co-morbidities. In this regard, healthy dietary patterns, characterized by high intake of plant-based foods, probiotics, antioxidants, soy beans, nuts, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a low intake of saturated fats, animal-derived proteins, and refined sugars, have been shown to decrease the risk of neurocognitive impairments and eventually the onset of AD...
March 16, 2018: Pharmacological Research: the Official Journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society
Paula Ortiz-Romero, Cristina Borralleras, Mònica Bosch-Morató, Biuse Guivernau, Guillermo Albericio, Francisco J Muñoz, Luis A Pérez-Jurado, Victoria Campuzano
Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a heterozygous deletion of 26-28 genes at chromosome band 7q11.23. The complete deletion (CD) mouse model mimics the most common deletion found in WBS patients and recapitulates most neurologic features of the disorder along with some cardiovascular manifestations leading to significant cardiac hypertrophy with increased cardiomyocytes' size. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin found in green tea, has been associated with potential health benefits, both on cognition and cardiovascular phenotypes, through several mechanisms...
2018: PloS One
Vanessa Bates, Ashim Maharjan, Jessica Millar, David K Bilkey, Ryan D Ward
Maternal immune activation (MIA) during gestation is a significant risk factor for development of schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental diseases. In animal models of this risk factor, MIA during pregnancy can produce offspring that recapitulate certain aspects of the behavioral and neurophysiological impairments seen in schizophrenia. Here, the authors tested the effect of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C)-induced MIA in a task that explicitly assays the interaction between motivation and cognition...
February 2018: Behavioral Neuroscience
Marta Zamarbide, Adam W Oaks, Heather L Pond, Julia S Adelman, M Chiara Manzini
Hundreds of genes are mutated in non-syndromic intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with each gene often involved in only a handful of cases. Such heterogeneity can be daunting, but rare recessive loss of function (LOF) mutations can be a good starting point to provide insight into the mechanisms of neurodevelopmental disease. Biallelic LOF mutations in the signaling scaffold CC2D1A cause a rare form of autosomal recessive ID, sometimes associated with ASD and seizures. In parallel, we recently reported that Cc2d1a -deficient mice present with cognitive and social deficits, hyperactivity and anxiety...
2018: Frontiers in Genetics
Cory S Inman, Kelly R Bijanki, David I Bass, Robert E Gross, Stephan Hamann, Jon T Willie
The amygdala is a key structure mediating emotional processing. Few studies have used direct electrical stimulation of the amygdala in humans to examine stimulation-elicited physiological and emotional responses, and the nature of such effects remains unclear. Determining the effects of electrical stimulation of the amygdala has important theoretical implications for current discrete and dimensional neurobiological theories of emotion, which differ substantially in their predictions about the emotional effects of such stimulation...
March 15, 2018: Neuropsychologia
Ernest Dallé, Musa V Mabandla
This review aims to shed light on the relationship that involves exposure to early life stress, depression and Parkinson's disease (PD). A systematic literature search was conducted in Pubmed, MEDLINE, EBSCOHost and Google Scholar and relevant data were submitted to a meta-analysis . Early life stress may contribute to the development of depression and patients with depression are at risk of developing PD later in life. Depression is a common non-motor symptom preceding motor symptoms in PD. Stimulation of regions contiguous to the substantia nigra as well as dopamine (DA) agonists have been shown to be able to attenuate depression...
March 19, 2018: Molecular Brain
Larisa V Lysenko, Jeesun Kim, Francisco Madamba, Anna A Tyrtyshnaia, Aarti Ruparelia, Alexander M Kleschevnikov
Down syndrome (DS) is the most frequent genetic cause of developmental abnormalities leading to intellectual disability. One notable phenomenon affecting the formation of nascent neural circuits during late developmental periods is developmental switch of GABA action from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing mode. We examined properties of this switch in DS using primary cultures and acute hippocampal slices from Ts65Dn mice, a genetic model of DS. Cultures of DIV3-DIV13 Ts65Dn and control normosomic (2 N) neurons were loaded with FURA-2 AM, and GABA action was assessed using local applications...
March 14, 2018: Neurobiology of Disease
Benneth Ben-Azu, Adegbuyi Oladele Aderibigbe, Abayomi Mayowa Ajayi, Aya-Ebi Okubo Eneni, Solomon Umukoro, Ezekiel O Iwalewa
GABAergic (Gamma-aminobutyric acid) and neurotrophic derangements have important implication in schizophrenia, a neuropsychiatric disease. Previous studies have shown that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH-oxidase) alters GABAergic and neurotrophic activities via inflammatory and oxidative pathways. Thus, it has been proposed that agents with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties might be beneficial for the treatment of the disease. Morin is neuroactive bioflavonoid compound, which has been reported to demonstrate antipsychotic and anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory activities...
March 13, 2018: Brain Research Bulletin
Nuria Farré, Ramon Farré, David Gozal
Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) has emerged as a highly prevalent public health problem that imposes important mid-term and long-term consequences, namely cardiovascular, metabolic, cognitive and cancer-related alterations. OSA is characterized by increased upper airway resistance, alveolar hypoventilation, and recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. Recurrent collapse of the upper airway develops with sleep onset, and is associated with both intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation. The microbiome is a vast and complex polymicrobial ecosystem that coexists with the human organism, and has been identified as playing significant roles in the development of host immunological phenotypes...
March 13, 2018: Chest
Supinder S Bedi, Benjamin M Aertker, George P Liao, Henry W Caplan, Deepa Bhattarai, Fanni Mandy, Franciska Mandy, Luis G Fernandez, Pamela Zelnick, Matthew B Mitchell, Walter Schiffer, Margaret Johnson, Emma Denson, Karthik Prabhakara, Hasen Xue, Philippa Smith, Karen Uray, Scott D Olson, Robert W Mays, Charles S Cox
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. TBI results in a prolonged secondary central neuro-inflammatory response. Previously, we have demonstrated that multiple doses (2 and 24 h after TBI) of multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) delivered intravenously preserve the blood-brain barrier (BBB), improve spatial learning, and decrease activated microglia/macrophages in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In order to determine if there is an optimum treatment window to preserve the BBB, improve cognitive behavior, and attenuate the activated microglia/macrophages, we administered MAPC at various clinically relevant intervals...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Jana Tchekalarova, Keylla da Conceição Machado, Antonio Luiz Gomes Júnior, Ana Amélia de Carvalho Melo Cavalcante, Albena Momchilova, Rumyana Tzoneva
PURPOSE: Activation of CB1 receptors, produces anticonvulsant effect accompanied by memory disturbance both in animal seizure tests and in patients with epilepsy. Few reports considered the role of CB2 receptor on seizure susceptibility and cognitive functions. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of a selective CB2 receptor agonist β-caryophyllene (BCP) in models of seizures and cognition in mice. METHODS: Dose-dependent effects of BCP was studied in maximal electroshock seizure (MES) test, subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) test and Morris water maze test...
March 12, 2018: Seizure: the Journal of the British Epilepsy Association
Matthew S Panizzon, Richard L Hauger, Hong Xian, Kristen Jacobson, Michael J Lyons, Carol E Franz, William S Kremen
Animal and human research suggests that testosterone is associated with hippocampal structure and function. Studies examining the association between testosterone and either hippocampal structure or hippocampal-mediated cognitive processes have overwhelmingly focused on the effects of testosterone alone, without considering the interaction of other neuroendocrine factors. The aim of the present study was to examine the interactive effects of testosterone and cortisol in relation to hippocampal volume and episodic memory in a sample of late-middle aged men from the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging...
March 9, 2018: Psychoneuroendocrinology
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