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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29734185/6th-iberian-primatological-congress
#1
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 7, 2018: Folia Primatologica; International Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29551762/why-china-is-important-in-advancing-the-field-of-primatology
#2
REVIEW
Paul A Garber
Over the past few decades, field studies conducted by Chinese primatologists have contributed significant new theoretical and empirical insights into the behavior, ecology, biology, genetics, and conservation of lorises, macaques, langurs, snub-nosed monkeys, and gibbons. With the recent establishment and inaugural meeting of the China Primatological Society in 2017, China has emerged as a leading nation in primate research. Several research teams have conducted long-term studies despite the difficult challenges of habituating and observing wild primates inhabiting mountainous temperate forests, and the fact that some 80% of China's 25-27 primate species are considered vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered and are distributed in small isolated subpopulations...
January 24, 2018: Zoological Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29551760/extant-primates-and-development-of-primatology-in-china-publications-student-training-and-funding
#3
Peng-Fei Fan, Chi Ma
China supports the richest non-human primate diversity in the northern hemisphere, providing an excellent opportunity for Chinese primatologists to take a leading role in advancing the study of primatology. Primatology in China began to flourish after 1979. To date, Chinese primatologists have published more than 1000 papers in journals indexed by the Chinese Science Citation Database and the Web of Science Core Collection, and universities and academic institutions have trained 107 PhD students and 370 Masters students between 1984 and 2016...
March 8, 2018: Zoological Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29485110/liberating-primatology
#4
EDITORIAL
Sindhu Radhakrishna, Dale Jamieson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Journal of Biosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298306/dna-recovery-from-wild-chimpanzee-tools
#5
Fiona A Stewart, Alexander K Piel, Lydia Luncz, Joanna Osborn, Yingying Li, Beatrice H Hahn, Michael Haslam
Most of our knowledge of wild chimpanzee behaviour stems from fewer than 10 long-term field sites. This bias limits studies to a potentially unrepresentative set of communities known to show great behavioural diversity on small geographic scales. Here, we introduce a new genetic approach to bridge the gap between behavioural material evidence in unhabituated chimpanzees and genetic advances in the field of primatology. The use of DNA analyses has revolutionised archaeological and primatological fields, whereby extraction of DNA from non-invasively collected samples allows researchers to reconstruct behaviour without ever directly observing individuals...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277935/american-journal-of-primatology-goals-and-priorities-of-a-new-editor
#6
EDITORIAL
Karen L Bales
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29216399/evolution-of-acidic-mammalian-chitinase-genes-chia-is-related-to-body-mass-and-insectivory-in-primates
#7
Mareike C Janiak, Morgan E Chaney, Anthony J Tosi
Insects are an important food resource for many primates, but the chitinous exoskeletons of arthropods have long been considered to be indigestible by the digestive enzymes of most mammals. However, recently mice and insectivorous bats were found to produce the enzyme acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) to digest insect exoskeletons. Here, we report on the gene CHIA and its paralogs, which encode AMCase, in a comparative sample of nonhuman primates. Our results show that early primates likely had three CHIA genes, suggesting that insects were an important component of the ancestral primate diet...
December 5, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29130511/a-decade-as-executive-editor-of-the-american-journal-of-primatology
#8
EDITORIAL
Paul A Garber
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095513/the-evolution-of-cranial-base-and-face-in-cercopithecoidea-and-hominoidea-modularity-and-morphological-integration
#9
Antonio Profico, Paolo Piras, Costantino Buzi, Fabio Di Vincenzo, Flavio Lattarini, Marina Melchionna, Alessio Veneziano, Pasquale Raia, Giorgio Manzi
The evolutionary relationship between the base and face of the cranium is a major topic of interest in primatology. Such areas of the skull possibly respond to different selective pressures. Yet, they are often said to be tightly integrated. In this paper, we analyzed shape variability in the cranial base and the facial complex in Cercopithecoidea and Hominoidea. We used a landmark-based approach to single out the effects of size (evolutionary allometry), morphological integration, modularity, and phylogeny (under Brownian motion) on skull shape variability...
December 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023874/multidisciplinary-studies-of-wildlife-trade-in-primates-challenges-and-priorities
#10
Mary E Blair, Minh D Le, Eleanor J Sterling
Wildlife trade is increasingly recognized as an unsustainable threat to primate populations and informing its management is a growing focus and application of primatological research. However, management policies based on ecological research alone cannot address complex socioeconomic or cultural contexts as drivers of wildlife trade. Multidisciplinary research is required to understand trade complexity and identify sustainable management strategies. Here, we define multidisciplinary research as research that combines more than one academic discipline, and highlight how the articles in this issue combine methods and approaches to fill key gaps and offer a more comprehensive understanding of underlying drivers of wildlife trade including consumer demand, enforcement patterns, source population status, and accessibility of targeted species...
November 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28929250/horse-cognition-and-behavior-from-the-perspective-of-primatology
#11
EDITORIAL
Tetsuro Matsuzawa
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Primates; Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28793298/xxiii-italian-association-of-primatology-congress-trento-italy-september-14-16-2017-abstracts
#12
Claudia Barelli, Francesco Rovero
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Folia Primatologica; International Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783206/high-mortality-associated-with-tapeworm-parasitism-in-geladas-theropithecus-gelada-in-the-simien-mountains-national-park-ethiopia
#13
India Schneider-Crease, Randi H Griffin, Megan A Gomery, Thore J Bergman, Jacinta C Beehner
Despite increasing appreciation for parasitism as an important component of primate ecology and evolution, surprisingly few studies have demonstrated the costs of helminth parasitism in primates. Detecting parasite-related costs in primates is particularly difficult because it requires detailed, long-term data on individual host reproductive success, survival, and parasitism. The identification of the larval tapeworm Taenia serialis in geladas under intensive long-term study in the Ethiopian Highlands (Nguyen et al...
September 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28768253/7th-european-federation-for-primatology-meeting-30e-colloque-de-la-soci%C3%A3-t%C3%A3-francophone-de-primatologie-strasbourg-france-august-21-25-2017-abstracts
#14
Hélène Meunier
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2017: Folia Primatologica; International Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28702756/creating-a-common-terminology-for-play-behavior-to-increase-cross-disciplinary-research
#15
Lance J Miller
Historically, play behavior has been difficult to define. This likely stems from the number of different species, types of play, and context under which it occurs. In 2016, the Chicago Zoological Society - Brookfield Zoo hosted the Psychonomic Society leading edge workshop on the evolutionary and psychological significance of play. Sixteen experts attended from the diverse fields of African ethnology, animal behavior, animal science, animal welfare, cognitive psychology, cognitive zoology, comparative psychology, cultural anthropology, developmental psychology, educational psychology, ethology, neuroscience, primatology, and zoology...
December 2017: Learning & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543783/alpha-male-replacements-in-nonhuman-primates-variability-in-processes-outcomes-and-terminology
#16
REVIEW
Julie A Teichroeb, Katharine M Jack
Alpha male replacements occur in all primates displaying a dominance hierarchy but the process can be extremely variable. Here, we review the primate literature to document differences in patterns of alpha male replacements, showing that group composition and dispersal patterns account for a large proportion of this variability. We also examine the consequences of alpha male replacements in terms of sexual selection theory, infanticide, and group compositions. Though alpha male replacements are often called takeovers in the literature, this term masks much of the variation that is present in these processes...
July 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28362872/evaluating-methods-for-estimating-home-ranges-using-gps-collars-a-comparison-using-proboscis-monkeys-nasalis-larvatus
#17
Danica J Stark, Ian P Vaughan, Diana A Ramirez Saldivar, Senthilvel K S S Nathan, Benoit Goossens
The development of GPS tags for tracking wildlife has revolutionised the study of home ranges, habitat use and behaviour. Concomitantly, there have been rapid developments in methods for estimating habitat use from GPS data. In combination, these changes can cause challenges in choosing the best methods for estimating home ranges. In primatology, this issue has received little attention, as there have been few GPS collar-based studies to date. However, as advancing technology is making collaring studies more feasible, there is a need for the analysis to advance alongside the technology...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28345759/stable-carbon-oxygen-and-nitrogen-isotope-analysis-of-plants-from-a-south-asian-tropical-forest-implications-for-primatology
#18
Patrick Roberts, Scott A Blumenthal, Wolfgang Dittus, Oshan Wedage, Julia A Lee-Thorp
Stable isotope analysis of primate tissues in tropical forest contexts is an increasingly popular means of obtaining information about niche distinctions among sympatric species, including preferences in feeding height, forest canopy density, plant parts, and trophism. However, issues of equifinality mean that feeding height, canopy density, as well as the plant parts and plant species consumed, may produce similar or confounding effects. With a few exceptions, researchers have so far relied largely on general principles and/or limited plant data from the study area as references for deducing the predominant drivers of primate isotope variation...
June 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076653/recent-advances-in-primate-nutritional-ecology
#19
Nicoletta Righini
Nutritional ecology seeks to explain, in an ecological and evolutionary context, how individuals choose, acquire, and process food to satisfy their nutritional requirements. Historically, studies of primate feeding ecology have focused on characterizing diets in terms of the botanical composition of the plants consumed. Further, dietary studies have demonstrated how patch and food choice in relation to time spent foraging and feeding are influenced by the spatial and temporal distribution of resources and by social factors such as feeding competition, dominance, or partner preferences...
April 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974777/primatology-macaques-vocally-equipped-to-speak
#20
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 14, 2016: Nature
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