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Disseminated Valley Fever

Mohamed A Kenawy, Yousrya M Abdel-Hamid, John C Beier
This article reviews and discusses the historical and recent status of Rift Valley Fever (RVF) in Egypt and the other African countries based on the available and scattered reports. The recent outbreaks in African countries were reviewed and mapped out. Four major epidemics have been recorded in Egypt (1977, 1978, 1993 and 2003). The outbreak resulted in unpredicted human disease with severe clinical manifestations and heavy mortality as well as many abortions and deaths in sheep, goats, cattle, water buffalo and camels...
January 31, 2018: Acta Tropica
T N J J Nepomichene, F N Raharimalala, S F Andriamandimby, J-P Ravalohery, A-B Failloux, J-M Heraud, S Boyer
Culex antennatus (Diptera: Culicidae), Anopheles coustani (Diptera: Culicidae) and Anopheles squamosus/cydippis were found to be infected with Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) during an epidemic that occurred in 2008 and 2009 in Madagascar. To understand the roles played by Cx. antennatus and An. coustani in virus maintenance and transmission, RVFV vector competence was assessed in each species. Mosquito body parts and saliva of mosquitoes that fed on RVFV-infected blood were tested for RVFV using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays...
January 31, 2018: Medical and Veterinary Entomology
Renée Zakhia, Laurence Mousson, Marie Vazeille, Nabil Haddad, Anna-Bella Failloux
West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) are two emerging arboviruses transmitted by Culex pipiens species that includes two biotypes: pipiens and molestus. In Lebanon, human cases caused by WNV and RVFV have never been reported. However, the introduction of these viruses in the country is likely to occur through the migratory birds and animal trades. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Cx. pipiens, a predominant mosquito species in urban and rural regions in Lebanon, to transmit WNV and RVFV...
January 11, 2018: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Laura Washburn, N Thao Galván, Sadhna Dhingra, Abbas Rana, John A Goss
Histoplasmosis is an endemic mycosis in the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys and can cause disseminated infection in immunocompromised hosts. Disseminated histoplasmosis is often respiratory in nature and most cases in transplant patients occur within 2 years post-transplantation. A 32-year-old male on mycophenolate and tacrolimus who underwent an orthotopic liver transplantation 10 years prior presented with generalized body aches, fevers, mild congestion, dysuria and elevated transaminases. Liver biopsy revealed epithelioid granulomas with narrow-based budding yeast, suggesting histoplasma...
December 2017: Journal of Surgical Case Reports
Seth D Judson, Matthew LeBreton, Trevon Fuller, Risa M Hoffman, Kevin Njabo, Timothy F Brewer, Elsa Dibongue, Joseph Diffo, Jean-Marc Feussom Kameni, Severin Loul, Godwin W Nchinda, Richard Njouom, Julius Nwobegahay, Jean Michel Takuo, Judith N Torimiro, Abel Wade, Thomas B Smith
Recent outbreaks of Ebola virus disease and Zika virus disease highlight the need for disseminating accurate predictions of emerging zoonotic viruses to national governments for disease surveillance and response. Although there are published maps for many emerging zoonotic viruses, it is unknown if there is agreement among different models or if they are concordant with national expert opinion. Therefore, we reviewed existing predictions for five high priority emerging zoonotic viruses with national experts in Cameroon to investigate these issues and determine how to make predictions more useful for national policymakers...
December 11, 2017: EcoHealth
Brittany L Dodson, Elizabeth S Andrews, Michael J Turell, Jason L Rasgon
Innovative tools are needed to alleviate the burden of mosquito-borne diseases, and strategies that target the pathogen are being considered. A possible tactic is the use of Wolbachia, a maternally inherited, endosymbiotic bacterium that can (but does not always) suppress diverse pathogens when introduced to naive mosquito species. We investigated effects of somatic Wolbachia (strain wAlbB) infection on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Culex tarsalis mosquitoes. When compared to Wolbachia-uninfected mosquitoes, there was no significant effect of Wolbachia infection on RVFV infection, dissemination, or transmission frequencies, nor on viral body or saliva titers...
October 2017: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Sibel Gür, Mehmet Kale, Nural Erol, Orhan Yapici, Nuri Mamak, Sibel Yavru
Rift valley fever (RVF), a vector-borne zoonotic disease, is caused by a phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae). The virus was initially characterized approximately 80 years ago in Kenya and disseminated to many countries in the continental Africa, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. The infection has not been reported in Turkey. In this study, blood serum samples collected from camel (Camelus dromedairus), goitered gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa subgutturosa), and buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis linneaus) from 2000 to 2006 were investigated for RVF using C-ELISA...
October 2017: Tropical Animal Health and Production
Rana Shahab, Nasir K Amra, Rola Rabah, Justin Saunar, Joan Soriano, Jaffar A Al-Tawfiq
Coccidioidomycosis is usually acquired by inhalation of spores of Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii. The disease ranges from a self-limited acute pneumonia (Valley Fever) to a disseminated disease. We present a 44-year-old healthy male who had patchy hair loss of several months duration resembling discoid lupus. He developed a firm non-scaly red plaque on the right forehead. Initial biopsy showed spongiotic dermatitis, and he was treated with systemic steroids. He then developed forehead and periorbital cellulitis and was treated with systemic antibiotics...
July 8, 2017: Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease
Gail Sondermeyer Cooksey, Alyssa Nguyen, Kirsten Knutson, Farzaneh Tabnak, Kaitlin Benedict, Orion McCotter, Seema Jain, Duc Vugia
Coccidioidomycosis, or Valley Fever, is an infectious disease caused by inhalation of Coccidioides spp. spores (1). This soil-dwelling fungus is endemic in the southwestern United States, with most (97%) U.S. cases reported from Arizona and California (1,2). Following an incubation period of 1-3 weeks, symptomatic patients most often experience self-limited, influenza-like symptoms, but coccidioidomycosis also can lead to severe pulmonary disease and to rare cases of disseminated disease, including meningitis (1)...
August 11, 2017: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
M Brustolin, S Talavera, A Nuñez, C Santamaría, R Rivas, N Pujol, M Valle, M Verdún, A Brun, N Pagès, N Busquets
Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne disease caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Rift Valley fever affects a large number of species, including human, and has severe impact on public health and the economy, especially in African countries. The present study examined the vector competence of three different European mosquito species, Culex pipiens (Linnaeus, 1758) form molestus (Diptera: Culicidae), Culex pipiens hybrid form and Stegomyia albopicta (= Aedes albopictus) (Skuse, 1894) (Diptera: Culicidae)...
August 7, 2017: Medical and Veterinary Entomology
Isabelle Dietrich, Stephanie Jansen, Gamou Fall, Stephan Lorenzen, Martin Rudolf, Katrin Huber, Anna Heitmann, Sabine Schicht, El Hadji Ndiaye, Mick Watson, Ilaria Castelli, Benjamin Brennan, Richard M Elliott, Mawlouth Diallo, Amadou A Sall, Anna-Bella Failloux, Esther Schnettler, Alain Kohl, Stefanie C Becker
The emerging bunyavirus Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is transmitted to humans and livestock by a large number of mosquito species. RNA interference (RNAi) has been characterized as an important innate immune defense mechanism used by mosquitoes to limit replication of positive-sense RNA flaviviruses and togaviruses; however, little is known about its role against negative-strand RNA viruses such as RVFV. We show that virus-specific small RNAs are produced in infected mosquito cells, in Drosophila melanogaster cells, and, most importantly, also in RVFV vector mosquitoes...
May 2017: MSphere
John Randolph Dryden, Michael David Starsiak, Mickaila James Johnston, Eugene David Silverman
Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is a systemic fungal infection resulting from inhalation of the Coccidioides immitis or posadasii spores. In many cases, infection causes a self-limited community-acquired pneumonia; however, in patients with risk factors, such as immunosuppression or African or Pacific Island ancestry, significant morbidity and mortality from disseminated disease may occur. Presented here are comparative images using Tc-MDP bone scan, F-FDG PET/CT, and MRI. Each demonstrates particular strengths, which aid in assessing the extent of systemic involvement of a biopsy-proven case of disseminated coccidioidomycosis...
April 2017: Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Hayriye Gulbudak, Vincent L Cannataro, Necibe Tuncer, Maia Martcheva
Vector-borne disease transmission is a common dissemination mode used by many pathogens to spread in a host population. Similar to directly transmitted diseases, the within-host interaction of a vector-borne pathogen and a host's immune system influences the pathogen's transmission potential between hosts via vectors. Yet there are few theoretical studies on virulence-transmission trade-offs and evolution in vector-borne pathogen-host systems. Here, we consider an immuno-epidemiological model that links the within-host dynamics to between-host circulation of a vector-borne disease...
February 2017: Bulletin of Mathematical Biology
Joseph D Forrester, Haiwei Henry Guo, Thomas G Weiser
BACKGROUND: Coccidioidomycosis, commonly called "valley fever," "San Joaquin fever," "desert fever," or "desert rheumatism," is a multi-system illness caused by infection with Coccidioides fungi (C. immitis or C. posadasii). This organism is endemic to the desert Southwest regions of the United States and Mexico and to parts of South America. The manifestations of infection occur along a spectrum from asymptomatic to mild self-limited fever to severe disseminated disease. METHODS: Review of the English-language literature...
December 2016: Surgical Infections
Hammami Pachka, Tran Annelise, Kemp Alan, Tshikae Power, Kgori Patrick, Chevalier Véronique, Paweska Janusz, Jori Ferran
BACKGROUND: In Northern Botswana, rural communities, livestock, wildlife and large numbers of mosquitoes cohabitate around permanent waters of the Okavango Delta. As in other regions of sub-Saharan Africa, Rift Valley Fever (RVF) virus is known to circulate in that area among wild and domestic animals. However, the diversity and composition of potential RVF mosquito vectors in that area are unknown as well as the climatic and ecological drivers susceptible to affect their population dynamics...
2016: Parasites & Vectors
Alessio Di Lorenzo, Daria Di Sabatino, Valeria Blanda, Daniela Cioci, Annamaria Conte, Rossana Bruno, Francesca Sauro, Paolo Calistri, Lara Savini
The Arbo‑zoonet Information System has been developed as part of the 'International Network for Capacity Building for the Control of Emerging Viral Vector Borne Zoonotic Diseases (Arbo‑zoonet)' project. The project aims to create common knowledge, sharing data, expertise, experiences, and scientific information on West Nile Disease (WND), Crimean‑Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF), and Rift Valley fever (RVF). These arthropod‑borne diseases of domestic and wild animals can affect humans, posing great threat to public health...
June 30, 2016: Veterinaria Italiana
Michael Loudin, Daniel R Clayburgh, Morgan Hakki
Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is caused by the dimorphic fungi Coccidioides immitis or Coccidioides posadasii. Most infections are asymptomatic or result in self-limited pneumonia; extrapulmonary dissemination via either hematogenous or lymphatic spread is rare. Here, we present a case of cervical C. immitis lymphadenitis that resulted in fistula formation to the esophagus via mediastinal extension. This case highlights a very unusual extrapulmonary manifestation of coccidioidomycosis, the difficulty in diagnosing coccidioidal infection when it is not suspected, and the importance of obtaining a thorough exposure history to assist with diagnosis...
2016: Case Reports in Infectious Diseases
Birgit Makoschey, Emma van Kilsdonk, Willem R Hubers, Mieke P Vrijenhoek, Marianne Smit, Paul J Wichgers Schreur, Jeroen Kortekaas, Véronique Moulin
Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that affects domesticated ruminants and occasionally humans. Classical RVF vaccines are based on formalin-inactivated virus or the live-attenuated Smithburn strain. The inactivated vaccine is highly safe but requires multiple administrations and yearly re-vaccinations. Although the Smithburn vaccine provides solid protection after a single vaccination, this vaccine is not safe for pregnant animals. An alternative live-attenuated vaccine, named Clone 13, carries a large natural deletion in the NSs gene which encodes the major virulence factor of the virus...
March 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
El Hadji Ndiaye, Gamou Fall, Alioune Gaye, Ndeye Sakha Bob, Cheikh Talla, Cheikh Tidiane Diagne, Diawo Diallo, Yamar B A, Ibrahima Dia, Alain Kohl, Amadou Alpha Sall, Mawlouth Diallo
BACKGROUND: Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Phlebovirus, Bunyaviridae) is a mosquito-borne, zoonotic pathogen. In Senegal, RVFV was first isolated in 1974 from Aedes dalzieli (Theobald) and thereafter from Ae. fowleri (de Charmoy), Ae. ochraceus Theobald, Ae. vexans (Meigen), Culex poicilipes (Theobald), Mansonia africana (Theobald) and Ma. uniformis (Theobald). However, the vector competence of these local species has never been demonstrated making hypothetical the transmission cycle proposed for West Africa based on serological data and mosquito isolates...
February 20, 2016: Parasites & Vectors
Amber M Riblett, Vincent A Blomen, Lucas T Jae, Louis A Altamura, Robert W Doms, Thijn R Brummelkamp, Jason A Wojcechowskyj
UNLABELLED: Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent insect-borne epizootics throughout the African continent, and infection of humans can lead to a lethal hemorrhagic fever syndrome. Deep mutagenesis of haploid human cells was used to identify host factors required for RVFV infection. This screen identified a suite of enzymes involved in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biogenesis and transport, including several components of the cis-oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex, one of the central components of Golgi complex trafficking...
November 18, 2015: Journal of Virology
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