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Gay men

Heather L Armstrong, Eric Abella Roth, Ashleigh Rich, Nathan J Lachowsky, Zishan Cui, Paul Sereda, Kiffer G Card, Jody Jollimore, Terry Howard, David M Moore, Robert S Hogg
Previous research indicates that gay and bisexual men (GBM) have significantly more sexual partners than same-aged heterosexual men and women. As a result, some HIV intervention programs have focused on partner reduction. However, new research findings question the relevance of sexual partner number as a sexual risk measure for GBM given Treatment as Prevention (TasP) programs and new seroadaptive strategies which have led to lower GBM community viral load and new HIV prevention behaviors. To assess if sexual partner number continues to remain an important measure of sexual risk for GBM living in a city that actively promotes TasP as provincial policy, we analysed cross-sectional data from 719 GBM recruited through respondent-driven sampling in Vancouver, Canada...
March 20, 2018: AIDS Care
Tyrel J Starks, Jeffrey T Parsons
The Young Men's Health Project (YMHP) has shown efficacy in reducing drug use and condomless anal sex (CAS) with casual partners among young gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (YGBMSM). The study examined whether relationship status at the time of intervention predicted response to YMHP by comparing baseline (pre-intervention) and follow-up (3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-intervention) data from the original trial. A group of 13 partnered YGBMSM who received YMHP was compared to a matched subsample of single YGBMSM...
March 19, 2018: AIDS and Behavior
Tania Pawade, Marie-Annick Clavel, Christophe Tribouilloy, Julien Dreyfus, Tiffany Mathieu, Lionel Tastet, Cedric Renard, Mesut Gun, William Steven Arthur Jenkins, Laurent Macron, Jacob W Sechrist, Joan M Lacomis, Virginia Nguyen, Laura Galian Gay, Hug Cuéllar Calabria, Ioannis Ntalas, Timothy Robert Graham Cartlidge, Bernard Prendergast, Ronak Rajani, Arturo Evangelista, João L Cavalcante, David E Newby, Philippe Pibarot, David Messika Zeitoun, Marc R Dweck
BACKGROUND: Computed tomography aortic valve calcium scoring (CT-AVC) holds promise for the assessment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to establish the clinical utility of CT-AVC in an international multicenter cohort of patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with AS who underwent ECG-gated CT-AVC within 3 months of echocardiography were entered into an international, multicenter, observational registry. Optimal CT-AVC thresholds for diagnosing severe AS were determined in patients with concordant echocardiographic assessments, before being used to arbitrate disease severity in those with discordant measurements...
March 2018: Circulation. Cardiovascular Imaging
Robert W McConkey, Catherine Holborn
PURPOSE: Gay men with prostate cancer are an 'invisible species' in the research literature despite concerns that the impact of treatment may be more profound and in some ways unique compared to heterosexual men. The aim of this research is to explore the lived experience of gay men with prostate cancer. METHOD: In-depth interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim from a purposive sample of eight gay men treated for prostate cancer in Ireland. A qualitative methodological approach employing Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method was used to collect and analyse data...
April 2018: European Journal of Oncology Nursing: the Official Journal of European Oncology Nursing Society
Oliver Stevens, Jamie I Forrest
Chemsex is a growing public health concern in urban centres, and few interventions exist to mitigate the significant sexual, drug-related, and social harms potentially experienced by people who participate in chemsex. In much of the world, these immediate harms are further compounded by the criminalisation and stigmatisation of both homosexuality and drug use, preventing participants fully engaging with treatment services or provision of health care. Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men participating in chemsex fall between the traditional definitions of key populations and consequently are poorly provided for by existing drug and sexual health frameworks...
March 19, 2018: Sexual Health
Elizabeth A McConnell, Patrick Janulis, Gregory Phillips, Roky Truong, Michelle Birkett
Minority stress theory has widespread research support in explaining health disparities experienced by sexual and gender minorities. However, less is known about how minority stress impacts multiply marginalized groups, such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people of color (LGBT POC). Also, although research has documented resilience in the face of minority stress at the individual level, research is needed that examines macro-level processes such as community resilience (Meyer, 2015). In the current study, we integrate minority stress theory and intersectionality theory to examine multiple minority stress (i...
March 2018: Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
Jennifer Power, Gosia Mikołajczak, Adam Bourne, Graham Brown, William Leonard, Anthony Lyons, Gary W Dowsett, Jayne Lucke
Background: This paper explores associations between use of party-and-play drugs, including crystal methamphetamine, and wellbeing among HIV positive gay and bisexual men (GBM) in Australia. This study considers whether use of drugs in a social or sex-based setting facilitates access to social and support networks, which may in turn support wellbeing. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Australian people living with HIV (PLHIV) was conducted. There were 714 participants (79.7%) who identified as GBM. Differences between party-and-play drug users and non-users were examined using bivariate and multinomial logistic regressions...
March 16, 2018: Sexual Health
Jeff M Michalski, Jennifer Moughan, James Purdy, Walter Bosch, Deborah W Bruner, Jean-Paul Bahary, Harold Lau, Marie Duclos, Matthew Parliament, Gerard Morton, Daniel Hamstra, Michael Seider, Michael I Lock, Malti Patel, Hiram Gay, Eric Vigneault, Kathryn Winter, Howard Sandler
Importance: Optimizing radiation therapy techniques for localized prostate cancer can affect patient outcomes. Dose escalation improves biochemical control, but no prior trials were powered to detect overall survival (OS) differences. Objective: To determine whether radiation dose escalation to 79.2 Gy compared with 70.2 Gy would improve OS and other outcomes in prostate cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: The NRG Oncology/RTOG 0126 randomized clinical trial randomized 1532 patients from 104 North American Radiation Therapy Oncology Group institutions March 2002 through August 2008...
March 15, 2018: JAMA Oncology
Jennifer S Dunkle
This qualitative study examined: 1) What older lesbians and gay men know about OAA-funded services; 2) attitudes towards the services; 3) experiences utilizing the services; 4) how current needs are met; and 5) plans for care as they age. Focus groups were conducted from June-August 2016. Purposive and snowball sampling yielded a sample size of 31. Five focus groups were conducted, and analysis used Grounded Theory. Four themes emerged: 1) low expectations of a welcoming environment, 2) the importance of being out, 3) need for LGBT-specific services, and 4) how to create inclusive services...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Gerontological Social Work
Michael A Irvine, Bernhard P Konrad, Warren Michelow, Robert Balshaw, Mark Gilbert, Daniel Coombs
Increasing HIV testing rates among high-risk groups should lead to increased numbers of cases being detected. Coupled with effective treatment and behavioural change among individuals with detected infection, increased testing should also reduce onward incidence of HIV in the population. However, it can be difficult to predict the strengths of these effects and thus the overall impact of testing. We construct a mathematical model of an ongoing HIV epidemic in a population of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men...
March 2018: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
Dean G Cruess, Kaylee E Burnham, David J Finitsis, Brett M Goshe, Lauren Strainge, Moira Kalichman, Tamar Grebler, Chauncey Cherry, Seth C Kalichman
Background: HIV disproportionately affects sexual minority men, and developing strategies to reduce transmission risk is a public health priority. Purpose: The goal was to empirically test a newly developed, Information, Motivation, Behavioral skills (IMB) theoretically derived, online HIV sexual risk reduction intervention (called HINTS) among a sample of sexual minority men living with HIV. Methods: Participants were 167 men randomized to either the four-session online HINTS intervention or to a time-matched, online control condition...
February 5, 2018: Annals of Behavioral Medicine: a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Julie Franks, Sharon B Mannheimer, Yael Hirsch-Moverman, Eleanor Hayes-Larson, Paul W Colson, Hugo Ortega, Wafaa M El-Sadr
INTRODUCTION: Black men who have sex with men and transgender women are at high risk for HIV infection, but are more likely to be unaware of their infection or not in care for diagnosed HIV compared to other races. Respondent driven sampling has been advanced as a method to reach stigmatized and hidden populations for HIV testing. We compared strategies to recruit black, substance-using men who have sex with men and transgender women to identify newly diagnosed HIV infection, or those previously diagnosed but not in care...
March 2018: Journal of the International AIDS Society
Jeffrey T Parsons, Steven A John, Brett M Millar, Tyrel J Starks
Prior research has identified subgroups of HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (GBM) based upon information, motivation, and behavioral skills (IMB) profiles related to HIV medication adherence and methamphetamine use. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a combined motivational interview (MI) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention tailored specifically to the unique context of HIV-positive GBM, and tested whether IMB profiles moderated treatment effects. HIV-positive GBM (N = 210) were randomized to MI + CBT or an attention-matched education control...
March 13, 2018: AIDS and Behavior
Kiffer G Card, Nathan J Lachowsky, Heather L Armstrong, Zishan Cui, Lu Wang, Paul Sereda, Jody Jollimore, Thomas L Patterson, Trevor Corneil, Robert S Hogg, Eric A Roth, David M Moore
INTRODUCTION: Among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM), collinearity between polysubstance use and mental health concerns has obscured their combined effects on HIV risk with multivariable results often highlighting only one or the other. METHODS: We used mediation and moderation analyses to examine the effects of polysubstance use and depressive symptoms on high-risk sex (i.e., condomless anal sex with serodiscordant/unknown status partner) in a sample of sexually-active GBM, aged ≥16 years, recruited in Metro Vancouver using respondent driven sampling...
March 6, 2018: Addictive Behaviors
Julie M Woulfe, Lisa A Goodman
Intimate partner violence (IPV; i.e., physical, sexual, or psychological abuse by a current or former partner) remains a public health concern with devastating personal and societal costs. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals are also vulnerable to a dimension of IPV called identity abuse (IA); that is, abuse tactics that leverage systemic oppression to harm an individual. Yet, we know little about its relative prevalence in subgroups of the LGBTQ community. This study developed and evaluated a measure of IA, and explored its prevalence in a sample of 734 sexual minority adults...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Mohamed A Hammoud, Stefanie Vaccher, Fengyi Jin, Adam Bourne, Bridget Haire, Lisa Maher, Toby Lea, Garrett Prestage
INTRODUCTION: Gay and bisexual men (GBM) often use illicit drugs to enhance sexual pleasure, commonly referred to as 'chemsex' or 'party n play'. In particular, the use of methamphetamine and Viagra™, and other erectile dysfunction medications, both together and separately are strongly predictive of subsequent HIV infection. Truvada™, as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), virtually eliminates HIV transmission during condomless anal intercourse (CLAI). HIV-negative GBM in intensive sex partying networks may be adding PrEP to their drug regimen to actively reduce the possibility of HIV transmission during chemsex...
March 8, 2018: International Journal on Drug Policy
Ellen Heinsbroek, Rachel Glass, Claire Edmundson, Vivian Hope, Monica Desai
BACKGROUND: Higher levels of drug use have been reported in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) communities, some of which can be explained by sexualised drug use, including 'chemsex'; the use of drugs before or during planned sexual activity to sustain, enhance, disinhibit or facilitate sex. We explored injecting and non-injecting drug use by sexual behaviour among people who inject drugs (PWID) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. METHODS: Data were used from an unlinked-anonymous survey of PWID (2013-2016), where participants recruited through services self-completed a questionnaire...
March 6, 2018: International Journal on Drug Policy
Peng-Wei Wang, Nai-Ying Ko, Ray C Hsiao, Mu-Hong Chen, Huang-Chi Lin, Cheng-Fang Yen
This study aimed to examine the associations of suicidality in emerging adulthood with time of coming out, gender role nonconformity, sexual orientation, traditional and cyber homophobic bullying victimization, and family and peer support during childhood in gay and bisexual men in Taiwan. The frequency of "experiencing suicide ideation" and "attempting suicide" in the past year among 500 gay or bisexual men was examined. The participants' time of coming out, level of subjective masculinity, sexual orientation, experiences of traditional and cyber homophobic bullying victimization, and levels of family and peer support during childhood were also evaluated...
March 9, 2018: Suicide & Life-threatening Behavior
Amanda M Pollitt, Brandon A Robinson, Debra Umberson
Research on gender inequality within different-sex marriages shows that women do more unpaid labor than men, and that the perception of inequality influences perceptions of marital quality. Yet research on same-sex couples suggests the importance of considering how gender is relational. Past studies show that same-sex partners share unpaid labor more equally and perceive greater equity than do different-sex partners, and that lesbian, gay, and bisexual people are less gender conforming than heterosexuals. However, studies have not considered how gender conformity might shape inequalities and marital quality within same- and different-sex unions...
2018: Gender & Society: Official Publication of Sociologists for Women in Society
Allison R Warren, Ann M Steffen
There is consensus that providers who work with transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) older adults should use the language preferred by the older adult; however, assessment tools to document professional training efforts are lacking. This study presents data on a new TGNC Language Self-Efficacy Scale, using responses collected from employees and volunteers of area agencies on aging (AAA) across the United States ( N = 155). Exploratory factor analysis supports a two-factor model: Interactions and Information subscales significantly correlated with knowledge of TGNC terminology, genderism and transphobia, gender role beliefs, beliefs about gender and gender identity, and attitudes toward lesbians and gay men...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Applied Gerontology: the Official Journal of the Southern Gerontological Society
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