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Fungal immunity

Jingni Wu, Yiming Wang, Sook-Young Park, Sang Gon Kim, Ju Soon Yoo, Sangryeol Park, Ravi Gupta, Kyu Young Kang, Sun Tae Kim
Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating fungal diseases of rice and results in a huge loss of rice productivity worldwide. During the infection process, M. oryzae secretes a large number of glycosyl hydrolase proteins into the host apoplast to digest the cell wall and facilitate fungal ingression into host tissues. In this study, we identified a novel arabinofuranosidase-B (MoAbfB) protein that is secreted by M. oryzae during fungal infection. Deletion of MoAbfB from M...
2016: PloS One
Voon Kin Chin, Tze Yan Lee, Basir Rusliza, Pei Pei Chong
Candida bloodstream infections remain the most frequent life-threatening fungal disease, with Candida albicans accounting for 70% to 80% of the Candida isolates recovered from infected patients. In nature, Candida species are part of the normal commensal flora in mammalian hosts. However, they can transform into pathogens once the host immune system is weakened or breached. More recently, mortality attributed to Candida infections has continued to increase due to both inherent and acquired drug resistance in Candida, the inefficacy of the available antifungal drugs, tedious diagnostic procedures, and a rising number of immunocompromised patients...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Juan Huang, Meiling Yang, Lu Lu, Xiaoming Zhang
RNA silencing is a conserved mechanism that utilizes small RNAs (sRNAs) to direct the regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Plants utilizing RNA silencing machinery to defend pathogen infection was first identified in plant-virus interaction and later was observed in distinct plant-pathogen interactions. RNA silencing is not only responsible for suppressing RNA accumulation and movement of virus and viroid, but also facilitates plant immune responses against bacterial, oomycete, and fungal infection...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Olga N Yaroslavtseva, Ivan M Dubovskiy, Viktor P Khodyrev, Bahytzhan A Duisembecov, Vadim Yu Kryukov, Viktor V Glupov
The synergistic effect between the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii and a sublethal dose of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. morrisoni var. tenebrionis was studied in terms of immune defense reactions and detoxification system activity of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, fourth instar larvae. Bacterial infection led to more rapid germination of fungal conidia on integuments. We found a significant decrease of cellular immunity parameters, including total hemocyte count and encapsulation response, under the influence of bacteria...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Insect Physiology
Yu Mi Seo, Seok Hwang-Bo, Seong Koo Kim, Seung Beom Han, Nack-Gyun Chung, Jin Han Kang
BACKGROUND: Although adenovirus (ADV) infection usually causes self-limiting respiratory disorders in immune competent children; severe and systemic ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia has been continuously reported. Nevertheless, there has been no consensus on risk factors and treatment strategies for severe ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy. CASE SUMMARY: We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with a fatal systemic ADV infection...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Jordi Gamir, Rabih Darwiche, Pieter Van't Hof, Vineet Choudhary, Michael Stumpe, Roger Schneiter, Felix Mauch
Pathogenesis-related proteins played a pioneering role fifty years ago in the discovery of plant innate immunity as a set of proteins that accumulated upon pathogen challenge. The most abundant of these proteins, PATHOGENESIS-RELATED 1 (PR-1) encodes a small antimicrobial protein that has become, as a marker of plant immune signaling, one of the most referred to plant proteins. However, the biochemical activity and mode of action of PR-1 proteins has remained elusive. Here, we provide genetic and biochemical evidence for the capacity of PR-1 proteins to bind sterols and demonstrate that the inhibitory effect on pathogen growth is caused by sterol sequestration from pathogens...
October 16, 2016: Plant Journal: for Cell and Molecular Biology
Maoulida Toueni, Cécile Ben, Aurélie Le Ru, Laurent Gentzbittel, Martina Rickauer
Resistance mechanisms to Verticillium wilt are well-studied in tomato, cotton, and Arabidopsis, but much less in legume plants. Because legume plants establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses in their roots, resistance to root-attacking pathogens merits particular attention. The interaction between the soil-borne pathogen Verticillium alfalfae and the model legume Medicago truncatula was investigated using a resistant (A17) and a susceptible (F83005.5) line. As shown by histological analyses, colonization by the pathogen was initiated similarly in both lines...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
Jeffrey J Coleman, Tomomi Komura, Julia Munro, Michael P Wu, Rakhee R Busanelli, Angela N Koehler, Méryl Thomas, Florence F Wagner, Edward B Holson, Eleftherios Mylonakis
AIM: Caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) phenethyl ester (CAPE), the major constituent of propolis, is able to increase the survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans after infection with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. RESULTS: CAPE increases the expression of several antimicrobial proteins involved in the immune response to C. albicans. Structural derivatives of CAPE were synthesized to identify structure-activity relationships and decrease metabolic liability, ultimately leading to a compound that has similar efficacy, but increased in vivo stability...
October 14, 2016: Future Medicinal Chemistry
Alon Vitenshtein, Yoav Charpak-Amikam, Rachel Yamin, Yoav Bauman, Batya Isaacson, Natan Stein, Orit Berhani, Liat Dassa, Moriya Gamliel, Chamutal Gur, Ariella Glasner, Carlos Gomez, Ronen Ben-Ami, Nir Osherov, Brendan P Cormack, Ofer Mandelboim
Natural killer (NK) cells form an important arm of the innate immune system and function to combat a wide range of invading pathogens, ranging from viruses to bacteria. However, the means by which NK cells accomplish recognition of pathogens with a limited repertoire of receptors remain largely unknown. In the current study, we describe the recognition of an emerging fungal pathogen, Candida glabrata, by the human NK cytotoxic receptor NKp46 and its mouse ortholog, NCR1. Using NCR1 knockout mice, we observed that this receptor-mediated recognition was crucial for controlling C...
October 12, 2016: Cell Host & Microbe
Babita Aneja, Mohammad Irfan, Charu Kapil, Mohamad Aman Jairajpuri, Ronan Maguire, Kevin Kavanagh, M Moshahid A Rizvi, Nikhat Manzoor, Amir Azam, Mohammad Abid
The increasing incidence of human candidiasis and the tendency of Candida species to become resistant to existing chemotherapies are well-recognized health problems. The present study demonstrates the successful synthesis of novel triazole-amino acid hybrids with potent in vitro and in vivo inhibitory activity against Candida species. Particularly, compounds 68 and 70 showed potent in vitro activity against fluconazole (FLC) resistant as well as sensitive clinical isolates of Candida albicans. Time kill curve analysis of lead inhibitors 68 and 70 showed their fungistatic nature...
October 13, 2016: Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry
Jordan J Allensworth, Scott H Troob, Tyler S Weaver, Javier D Gonzalez, Daniel Petrisor, Mark K Wax
OBJECTIVE: Acute invasive fungal sinusitis (AIFS) is a frequently fatal infection for which extensive and debilitating surgical debridement is a mainstay of therapy. Resulting defects are often composite in nature, mandating free tissue-transfer reconstruction. Outcomes data for free flap reconstruction are limited. The purpose of this study was to examine surgical outcomes and survival in patients undergoing free flap transfer following invasive fungal sinusitis. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series...
October 12, 2016: Laryngoscope
Ludivine Cambier, Marie-Pierre Heinen, Bernard Mignon
Dermatophytoses are common superficial fungal infections affecting both humans and animals. They are provoked by filamentous fungi called dermatophytes specialized in the degradation of keratinized structures, which allows them to induce skin, hair and nail infections. Despite their high incidence, little investigation has been performed for the understanding of these infections compared to fungal opportunistic infections and most of the studies were based on in vitro experiments. The development of animal models for dermatophyte research is required to evaluate new treatments against dermatophytoses or to increase knowledge about fungal pathogenicity factors or host immune response mechanisms...
October 11, 2016: Mycopathologia
Mary K Klassen-Fischer, Ronald C Neafie
Surgical pathology results can play a crucial role in the management of immunocompromised patients. Here we highlight factors that differ between immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts, such as variation in inflammatory response. Conditions that are covered include drug reactions, disease within solid organ allografts, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, specific immunodeficiency syndromes, neoplasms related to viral infections, and viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic infections. Special techniques including immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and molecular detection of pathogen nucleic acid from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue are discussed...
August 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Luciano Polonelli, Tecla Ciociola, Lisa Elviri, Pier Paolo Zanello, Laura Giovati, Denise C Arruda, Julián E Muñoz, Renato A Mortara, Giulia Morace, Elisa Borghi, Serena Galati, Oriano Marin, Claudio Casoli, Elisabetta Pilotti, Paola Ronzi, Luiz R Travassos, Walter Magliani, Stefania Conti
A phosphorylated peptide, named K40H, derived from the constant region of IgMs was detected in human serum by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Synthetic K40H proved to exert a potent in vitro activity against fungal pathogens, and to inhibit HIV-1 replication in vitro and ex vivo. It also showed a therapeutic effect against an experimental infection by Candida albicans in the invertebrate model Galleria mellonella. K40H represents the proof of concept of the innate role that naturally occurring antibody fragments may exert against infectious agents, shedding a new light upon the posthumous role of antibodies and opening a new scenario on the multifaceted functionality of humoral immunity...
October 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
E Peel, Y Cheng, J T Djordjevic, S Fox, T C Sorrell, K Belov
Tasmanian devil joeys, like other marsupials, are born at a very early stage of development, prior to the development of their adaptive immune system, yet survive in a pathogen-laden pouch and burrow. Antimicrobial peptides, called cathelicidins, which provide innate immune protection during early life, are expressed in the pouch lining, skin and milk of devil dams. These peptides are active against pathogens identified in the pouch microbiome. Of the six characterised cathelicidins, Saha-CATH5 and 6 have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and are capable of killing problematic human pathogens including methicillin-resistant S...
October 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
Brittany F Peterson, Michael E Scharf
BACKGROUND: Symbioses throughout the animal kingdom are known to extend physiological and ecological capabilities to hosts. Insect-microbe associations are extremely common and are often related to novel niche exploitation, fitness advantages, and even speciation events. These phenomena include expansions in host diet, detoxification of insecticides and toxins, and increased defense against pathogens. However, dissecting the contributions of individual groups of symbionts at the molecular level is often underexplored due to methodological and analytical limitations...
October 1, 2016: BMC Genomics
Julien Verdon, Pierre Coutos-Thevenot, Marie-Helene Rodier, Celine Landon, Segolene Depayras, Cyril Noel, Sylvain La Camera, Bouziane Moumen, Pierre Greve, Didier Bouchon, Jean-Marc Berjeaud, Christine Braquart-Varnier
Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, there are currently 15 distinct AMP families published so far in the literature, mainly isolated from members of the Decapoda order. Up to now, armadillidin is the sole non-decapod AMP isolated from the haemocytes of Armadillidium vulgare, a crustacean isopod. Its first description demonstrated that armadillidin is a linear glycine-rich (47%) cationic peptide with an antimicrobial activity directed toward Bacillus megaterium...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Satoshi Fukunaga, Miho Sogame, Masaki Hata, Suthitar Singkaravanit-Ogawa, Mariola Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariko Onozawa-Komori, Takumi Nishiuchi, Kei Hiruma, Hiromasa Saitoh, Ryohei Terauchi, Saeko Kitakura, Yoshihiro Inoue, Paweł Bednarek, Paul Schulze-Lefert, Yoshitaka Takano
Plant immune responses triggered upon recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) typically restrict pathogen growth without a host cell death response. We isolated two Arabidopsis mutants, derived from accession Col-0, that activate cell death upon inoculation with nonadapted fungal pathogens. Notably, the mutants trigger cell death also when treated with bacterial MAMPs such as flg22. Positional cloning identified NSL1 (Necrotic Spotted Lesion 1) as a responsible gene for the phenotype of the two mutants, whereas nsl1 mutations of the accession No-0 result in necrotic lesion formation without pathogen inoculation...
October 6, 2016: Plant Journal: for Cell and Molecular Biology
Neeraj K Lal, Andrew J Fisher, Savithramma P Dinesh-Kumar
Receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases (RLCKs) in Arabidopsis play a central role in the integration of signaling input from various growth and immune signaling pathways. BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE 1 (BIK1), belonging to the RLCK family, is an important player in defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens and in ethylene and brassinosteroid hormone signaling. In this study, the purification and crystallization of a first member of the class VI family of RLCK proteins, BIK1, are reported. BIK1 was crystallized using the microbatch-under-oil method...
October 1, 2016: Acta Crystallographica. Section F, Structural Biology Communications
Margaret L Barlow, Ryan J Cummings, Alice P Pentland, Tanzy M T Love, Constantine G Haidaris, Julie L Ryan, Edith M Lord, Scott A Gerber
Exposure to radiation, particularly a large or total-body dose, weakens the immune system through loss of bone marrow precursor cells, as well as diminished populations of circulating and tissue-resident immune cells. One such population is the skin-resident immune cells. Changes in the skin environment can be of particular importance as the skin is also host to a number of commensal organisms, including Candida albicans , a species of fungus that causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients...
October 6, 2016: Radiation Research
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