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Mountain sickness

Mohan Paudel, Sara Javanparast, Gouranga Dasvarma, Lareen Newman
OBJECTIVE AND THE CONTEXT: This paper examines the beliefs and experiences of women and their families in remote mountain villages of Nepal about perinatal sickness and death and considers the implications of these beliefs for future healthcare provision. METHODS: Two mountain villages were chosen for this qualitative study to provide diversity of context within a highly disadvantaged region. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 women of childbearing age and their family members, 15 health service providers, and 5 stakeholders...
2018: PloS One
Genta Ochi, Yusuke Kanazawa, Kazuki Hyodo, Kazuya Suwabe, Takeshi Shimizu, Takemune Fukuie, Kyeongho Byun, Hideaki Soya
Although it has been traditionally thought that decreasing SpO2 with ascent to high altitudes not only induces acute mountain sickness but also can decrease executive function, the relationship between decreased SpO2 levels and hypoxia-induced lowered executive function is still unclear. Here we aimed to clarify whether hypoxia-induced lowered executive function was associated with arterial oxygen desaturation, using 21 participants performing the color-word Stroop task under normoxic and three hypoxic conditions (FIO2  = 0...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Physiological Sciences: JPS
Alejandro Gabriel G Gonzalez Garay, Daniel Molano Franco, Víctor H Nieto Estrada, Arturo J Martí-Carvajal, Ingrid Arevalo-Rodriguez
BACKGROUND: High altitude illness (HAI) is a term used to describe a group of mainly cerebral and pulmonary syndromes that can occur during travel to elevations above 2500 metres (˜ 8200 feet). Acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) are reported as potential medical problems associated with high altitude ascent. In this second review, in a series of three about preventive strategies for HAI, we assessed the effectiveness of five of the less commonly used classes of pharmacological interventions...
March 12, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
S Y Wang, S Cui, Z Q Li, L H Ji, J Ma, H H Liu, G Y Zhang, S H Suo, R L Ge
Objective: To investigate the changes of CD71(+) nucleated erythrocyte apoptosis, cytochrome C (Cyt-C) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in bone marrow of chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Methods: 14 patients with CMS and 15 patients with simple old fracture were divided into CMS group and control group, respectively.Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were separated, marked with CD71 monoclonal antibody and stained with Annexin V-FITC/PI.Then the apoptotic index of CD71(+) nucleated erythrocytes was determined by flow cytometry...
February 13, 2018: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
Hang Yao, Helen Zhao, Juan Wang, Gabriel G Haddad
Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS) occurs in high altitude residence with major neurological symptoms such as migraine headaches, dizziness and cognitive deficits. Recent work demonstrated that highlanders have increased intracellular pH (pH i ) in their brain cells, perhaps for the sake of adaptation to hypoxemia and help to facilitate glycolysis, DNA synthesis, and cell cycle progression. Since there are well adapted (non-CMS) and maladapted (CMS) high altitude dwellers, it is not clear whether pH i is differently regulated in these two high altitude populations...
February 10, 2018: Neuroscience
Gu Gong, Liang Yin, Libang Yuan, Daming Sui, Yangyang Sun, Haiyu Fu, Liang Chen, Xiaowu Wang
High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a severe type of acute mountain sickness (AMS) that occurs in response to a high altitude hypobaric hypoxic (HH) environment. GM1 monosialoganglioside can alleviate brain injury under adverse conditions including amyloid-β-peptide, ischemia and trauma. However, its role in HACE-induced brain damage remains poorly elucidated. In this study, GM1 supplementation dose-dependently attenuated increase in rat brain water content (BWC) induced by hypobaric chamber (7600 m) exposurefor 24 h...
February 8, 2018: Molecular Immunology
Boris Vrga, Tatjana Vrga
What has been researched and reconstructed, based on archival documents and data from professional literature, is the activity of the State school-polyclinic in Petrinja, from its foundation in 1925 to its termination in 1945. Key figures taking part in its activity have also been highlighted. Founded as one of the first school-polyclinics in Croatia, the State school-polyclinic in Petrinja developed complete preventive and curative health activities aimed at school population in Petrinja as well as at pupils from the village schools in Petrinja County...
December 2017: Acta Medico-historica Adriatica: AMHA
Arthur R Bradwell, Kimberley Ashdown, Carla Rue, John Delamere, Owen D Thomas, Samuel J E Lucas, Alex D Wright, Stephen J Harris, Stephen D Myers
Objective: To assess whether acetazolamide (Az), used prophylactically for acute mountain sickness (AMS), alters exercise capacity at high altitude. Methods: Az (500 mg daily) or placebo was administered to 20 healthy adults (aged 36±20 years, range 21-77), who were paired for age, sex, AMS susceptibility and weight, in a double-blind, randomised manner. Participants ascended over 5 days to 4559 m, then exercised to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer, while recording breath-by-breath gas measurements...
2018: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
Helen Zhao, Guy A Perkins, Hang Yao, David Callacondo, Otto Appenzeller, Mark Ellisman, Albert R La Spada, Gabriel G Haddad
Patients with Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS) suffer from hypo¬xemia, erythrocyto¬sis, and numerous neuro¬logic deficits. Here we used iPSC-derived neu¬rons from both CMS and non-CMS subjects to study CMS neuro¬patho¬logy. We report that CMS neu¬rons have a decreased mito¬chondrial volume density, length and less cristae membrane surface area using transmission electron microscopy. Real-time PCR confirmed a decreased mito¬chondrial DNA content and mito¬chondrial fusion gene OPA1 expression. Immunoblot analysis showed an accumulation of the short isoform of OPA1 (S- OPA1) in CMS neu¬rons, which have reduced ATP levels under normoxia and in¬creased LDH release and caspase 3 activation after hypoxia...
December 21, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
Wei Wu, Hang Yao, Helen W Zhao, Juan Wang, Gabriel G Haddad
Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) or Monge's disease is a disease in highlanders. These patients have a variety of neurologic symptoms such as migraine, mental fatigue, confusion, dizziness, loss of appetite, memory loss and neuronal degeneration. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying CMS neuropathology is not understood. In the previous study, we demonstrated that neurons derived from CMS patients' fibroblasts have a decreased expression and altered gating properties of voltage-gated sodium channel...
January 17, 2018: Neuroscience
Hui Lu, Rong Wang, Wenbin Li, Hua Xie, Chang Wang, Ying Hao, Yuhuan Sun, Zhengping Jia
Although extensive studies have focused on the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS), the exact mechanisms of AMS are still obscure. In this study, we used isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to identify novel AMS-associated biomarkers in human plasma. After 9 hours of hypobaric hypoxia the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, glycolysis, ribosome, and proteasome were significantly reduced in AMS resistant (AMS-) group, but not in AMS susceptible (AMS+) group...
January 19, 2018: Scientific Reports
Masahiro Horiuchi, Junko Endo, Yoko Handa, Hiroshi Nose
We investigated effects of change in barometric pressure (P B) with climate change on heart rate (HR) during sleep at 3000 m altitude. Nineteen healthy adults (15 males and four females; mean age 32 years) participated in this study. We measured P B (barometry) and HR (electrocardiography) every minute during their overnight stay in a mountain lodge at ~ 3000 m. We also measured resting arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) and evaluated symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) by using the Lake Louise Questionnaire at 2305 and 3000 m, respectively...
December 27, 2017: International Journal of Biometeorology
Cristina Masuet-Aumatell, Alba Sánchez-Mascuñano, Fernando Agüero Santangelo, Sergio Morchón Ramos, Josep Maria Ramon-Torrell
Aims: Previous epidemiological investigations of the relationship between smoking and acute mountain sickness (AMS) risk yielded inconsistent findings. Therefore, a meta-analysis of observational studies was performed to determine whether smoking is related to the development of AMS. Methods: Searches were performed on PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science for relevant studies that were published before November 2016 reporting smoking prevalence and AMS. Two evaluators independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed study quality...
2017: BioMed Research International
Giovanni Nachtigall Maurício, Marcos Ricardo Bornschein
The Brazilian tapaculo Scytalopus speluncae species-group has been the subject of intense taxonomic work in the past 18 years, with six new species being named in that time lapse and other taxonomic problems having been highlighted (Bornschein et al. 1998, 2007; Maurício 2005; Raposo et al. 2006, 2012; Mata et al. 2009; Whitney et al. 2010; Maurício et al. 2010, 2014; Pulido-Santacruz et al. 2016). One of the most persistent of these problems involves the oldest name in this group, S. speluncae (Ménétriès), and the taxa it may represent...
November 20, 2017: Zootaxa
Katharina Hüfner, Hermann Brugger, Eva Kuster, Franziska Dünsser, Agnieszka E Stawinoga, Rachel Turner, Iztok Tomazin, Barbara Sperner-Unterweger
BACKGROUND: Psychotic episodes during exposure to very high or extreme altitude have been frequently reported in mountain literature, but not systematically analysed and acknowledged as a distinct clinical entity. METHODS: Episodes reported above 3500 m altitude with possible psychosis were collected from the lay literature and provide the basis for this observational study. Dimensional criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were used for psychosis, and the Lake Louise Scoring criteria for acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral oedema (HACE)...
December 5, 2017: Psychological Medicine
E Carli, A Carminato, S Ravagnan, K Capello, M T Antognoni, A Miglio, T Furlanello, D Proverbio, E Spada, A Stefani, F Mutinelli, M Vascellari
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA 1) in canine population is approximately 40-60%. Often data are limited to a small number of breeds and/or dogs. The aims of this study were to evaluate frequency of DEA 1 in a large population of purebred and mongrel dogs including Italian native breeds and to recognize a possible association between DEA 1 and breed, sex, and genetic and phenotypical/functional classifications of breeds. Frequencies of DEA 1 blood group collected from screened/enrolled blood donors and from healthy and sick dogs were retrospectively evaluated...
November 29, 2017: BMC Veterinary Research
Chengyu Zhao, Zhanquan Li, Linhua Ji, Jie Ma, Ri-Li Ge, Sen Cui
BACKGROUND Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) has a higher incidence in the plateau region. The one of its principal characters is excessive erythrocytosis. The PI3K-Akt pathway plays an important role in the process of erythropoiesis, and could downregulate apoptosis by regulating apoptosis-related molecules. In this paper, we explored the change in apoptosis of erythroblasts and the effect of the PI3K-Akt signal pathway on erythroblasts apoptosis in CMS. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 22 CMS and 20 non-CMS participants were involved in this study...
November 26, 2017: Medical Science Monitor: International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research
Paul J Anderson, Christina M Wood-Wentz, Kent R Bailey, Bruce D Johnson
Anderson, Paul J., Christina M. Wood-Wentz, Kent R. Bailey, and Bruce D. Johnson. Objective versus self-reported sleep quality at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 16:000-000, 2017. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found little relationship between polysomnography and a diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS) using the Lake Louise Symptom Questionnaire (LLSQ). The correlation between sleep question responses on the LLSQ and polysomnography results has not been explored. We compared LLSQ sleep responses and polysomnography data from our previous study of workers rapidly transported to the South Pole...
November 27, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
Kannan Sridharan, Gowri Sivaramakrishnan
BACKGROUND: Individuals ascending to high altitude are at a risk of getting acute mountain sickness (AMS). The present study is a network meta-analysis comparing all the interventions available to prevent AMS. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched for randomized clinical trials evaluating the use of drugs to prevent AMS. Incidence of AMS was the primary outcome and incidence of severe AMS, paraesthesia (as side effect of acetazolamide use), headache and severe headache, and oxygen saturation were the secondary outcomes...
March 2018: Annals of Medicine
Yiduo Zhao, Zhiying Zhang, Lijun Liu, Yao Zhang, Xiaowei Fan, Lifeng Ma, Jing Li, Yuan Zhang, Haijin He, Longli Kang
High altitude polycythemia (HAPC) is a common chronic disease at high altitude, which is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis (females, hemoglobin ≥ 190 g/L; males, hemoglobin ≥ 210 g/L). It is the most common disease in chronic mountain sickness casued primarily by persistent arterial hypoxia and ventilatory impairment. However, the disease is still unmanageable and related molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. This study aims to explore the genetic basis of HAPC in the Chinese Han and Tibetan populations...
October 17, 2017: Oncotarget
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