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Mountain sickness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28611780/il-10-dysregulation-in-acute-mountain-sickness-revealed-by-transcriptome-analysis
#1
Bao Liu, Jian Chen, Long Zhang, Yixing Gao, Jianhua Cui, Erlong Zhang, Gang Xu, Yan Liang, Yu Liang, Jian Wang, Yuqi Gao
Acute mountain sickness (AMS), which may progress to life-threatening high-altitude cerebral edema, is a major threat to millions of people who live in or travel to high altitude. Although studies have revealed the risk factors and pathophysiology theories of AMS, the molecular mechanisms of it do not comprehensively illustrate. Here, we used a system-level methodology, RNA sequencing, to explore the molecular mechanisms of AMS at genome-wide level in 10 individuals. After exposure to high altitude, a total of 1,164 and 1,322 differentially expressed transcripts were identified in AMS and non-AMS groups, respectively...
2017: Frontiers in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28609593/travelling-safely-to-places-at-high-altitude-understanding-and-preventing-altitude-illness
#2
Ivan Parise
BACKGROUND: Greater numbers of people are travelling to places at high altitude each year. Altitude illness is common in places at high altitude and may be life-threatening. General practitioners (GPs) are best placed to provide evidence-based advice to keep travellers well informed of the possible risks they may encounter in places at high altitude. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to review knowledge on altitude illness in order to help GPs assist patients to travel safely to places at high altitude...
June 2017: Australian Family Physician
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590162/exercise-testing-supplemental-oxygen-and-hypoxia
#3
Susan A Ward, Michael Pw Grocott, Denny Zh Levett
Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in hyperoxia and hypoxia has several applications, stemming from characterization of abnormal physiological response profiles associated with exercise intolerance. As altered oxygenation can impact on the performance of gas-concentration and flow sensors and pulmonary gas exchange algorithms, integrated CPET system function requires validation under these conditions. Also, as oxygenation status can influence peak O2 uptake, care should be taken in the selection of work-rate incrementation rates when CPET performance is to be compared with sea-level...
June 7, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28582330/high-altitude-illness-in-the-pediatric-population-a-review-of-the-literature-on-prevention-and-treatment
#4
Vanessa Garlick, Anne O'Connor, Catherine D Shubkin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Increasing numbers of children are now traveling to high-altitude destinations, and pediatricians often see these children prior to and immediately following their travels. Thus, pediatricians have the opportunity to provide guidance for the prevention of altitude illness and must treat high-altitude illness (HAI) in some circumstances. This review will examine guidelines for prevention and management of HAI in the pediatric population. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research has examined children's short-term cardiorespiratory adaptation to high altitude, incidence of acute mountain sickness, hypoxic ventilator response, and maximal exercise capacity...
June 2, 2017: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540933/the-effect-of-high-altitude-on-central-blood-pressure-and-arterial-stiffness
#5
C J Boos, E Vincent, A Mellor, D R Woods, C New, R Cruttenden, M Barlow, M Cooke, K Deighton, P Scott, S Clarke, J O'Hara
Central arterial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and arterial stiffness are known to be better predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes than brachial SBP. The effect of progressive high altitude (HA) on these parameters has not been examined. Ninety healthy adults were included. Central BP and the augmentation index (AI) were measured at the level of the brachial artery (Uscom BP(+) device) at <200 m and at 3619, 4600 and 5140 m. The average age of the subjects (70% men) were 32.2±8.7 years. Compared with central arterial pressures, brachial SBP (+8...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Human Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533889/effects-of-low-dose-acetazolamide-on-exercise-performance-in-simulated-altitude
#6
Ernst Elisabeth, Gatterer Hannes, Burtscher Johannes, Faulhaber Martin, Pocecco Elena, Burtscher Martin
Preventive effects of acetazolamide (ACZ) on acute mountain sickness (AMS) are well established but effects on exercise performance at high altitude or in hypoxia have been less considered and are still inconsistent. We hypothesized that low-dose ACZ would not impair exercise performance at simulated high altitude. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction between low-dose ACZ and exercise performance in normobaric hypoxia. Sixteen subjects (8 males and 8 females) were randomly assigned either to receive low-dose ACZ (3×125 mg in 36 hours) or placebo...
2017: International Journal of Physiology, Pathophysiology and Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28522921/thin-air-resulting-in-high-pressure-mountain-sickness-and-hypoxia-induced-pulmonary-hypertension
#7
REVIEW
Jan Grimminger, Manuel Richter, Khodr Tello, Natascha Sommer, Henning Gall, Hossein Ardeschir Ghofrani
With rising altitude the partial pressure of oxygen falls. This phenomenon leads to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude. Since more than 140 million people permanently live at heights above 2500 m and more than 35 million travel to these heights each year, understanding the mechanisms resulting in acute or chronic maladaptation of the human body to these circumstances is crucial. This review summarizes current knowledge of the body's acute response to these circumstances, possible complications and their treatment, and health care issues resulting from long-term exposure to high altitude...
2017: Canadian Respiratory Journal: Journal of the Canadian Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509579/findings-of-cognitive-impairment-at-high-altitude-relationships-to-acetazolamide-use-and-acute-mountain-sickness
#8
Lara Phillips, Buddha Basnyat, Yuchiao Chang, Erik R Swenson, N Stuart Harris
Phillips, Lara, Buddha Basnyat, Yuchiao Chang, Erik R. Swenson, and N. Stuart Harris. Findings of cognitive impairment at high altitude: relationships to acetazolamide use and acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol. 18:121-127, 2017. OBJECTIVE: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is defined by patient-reported symptoms using the Lake Louise Score (LLS), which provides limited insight into any possible underlying central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. Some evidence suggests AMS might coexist with altered neural functioning...
June 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28498559/altitude-sickness-and-altitude-adaptation
#9
EDITORIAL
Pontus B Persson, Anja B Persson
For as long as humanity can recall, it has probably been a dream of mankind to conquer mountainous heights and the mysterious deep. Loss of innocence is a common theme across ancient religions. Ancient Hindu legend has an interesting variation on the story: When Brahma realized that man did not deserve divinity, he decided to take it from them and hide it, but where? Brahma did what researchers up to present day are familiar with: ask your peers, in his case, a board of other gods. Brainstorming yielded a number of potential hiding places...
May 12, 2017: Acta Physiologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481626/retinal-hemorrhage-in-a-high-altitude-aid-post-volunteer-doctor-a-case-report
#10
Sanjeeb Sudarshan Bhandari, Pranawa Koirala, Nirajan Regmi, Sushil Pant
Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan, Pranawa Koirala, Nirajan Regmi, and Sushil Pant. Retinal hemorrhage in a high-altitude aid post volunteer doctor: a case report. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2017.-High-altitude retinal hemorrhages (HARHs) are seen at altitudes more than 3000 m, are usually multiple, flame shaped, and adjacent to blood vessels. Development near the macula causes blurring of vision, otherwise, they are symptomless and self-limiting. They often develop during the first few days after ascent to high altitude and subjects often suffer from acute mountain sickness (AMS) or high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE)...
May 8, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28479001/prophylactic-acetaminophen-or-ibuprofen-result-in-equivalent-acute-mountain-sickness-incidence-at-high-altitude-a-prospective-randomized-trial
#11
Nicholas C Kanaan, Alicia L Peterson, Matiram Pun, Peter S Holck, Jennifer Starling, Bikash Basyal, Thomas F Freeman, Jessica R Gehner, Linda Keyes, Dana R Levin, Catherine J O'Leary, Katherine E Stuart, Ghan B Thapa, Aditya Tiwari, Jared L Velgersdyk, Ken Zafren, Buddha Basnyat
OBJECTIVE: Recent trials have demonstrated the usefulness of ibuprofen in the prevention of acute mountain sickness (AMS), yet the proposed anti-inflammatory mechanism remains unconfirmed. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen were tested for AMS prevention. We hypothesized that a greater clinical effect would be seen from ibuprofen due to its anti-inflammatory effects compared with acetaminophen's mechanism of possible symptom reduction by predominantly mediating nociception in the brain. METHODS: A double-blind, randomized trial was conducted testing acetaminophen vs ibuprofen for the prevention of AMS...
May 4, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28478843/respiratory-alkalosis-may-impair-the-production-of-vitamin-d-and-lead-to-significant-morbidity-including-the-fibromyalgia-syndrome
#12
John M Lewis, Toinette H Fontrier, J Lynn Coley
Hyperventilation caused by physical and/or psychological stress may lead to significant respiratory alkalosis and an elevated systemic pH. The alkalotic pH may in turn suppress the normal renal release of phosphate into the urine, thereby interrupting the endogenous production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol). This could cause a shortfall in its normal production, leading to a variety of adverse consequences. It might partially explain the pathogenesis of acute mountain sickness, a treatable disease characterized by severe hyperventilation secondary to the hypoxia of high altitude exposure...
May 2017: Medical Hypotheses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474702/-hemoglobin-changes-hb-in-miners-exposed-to-high-altitude-and-associated-factors
#13
Christian R Mejia, Dante M Quiñones-Laveriano, Raúl Gomero, Luis Pérez-Pérez
AIM: To determine the variation of hemoglobin (Hb) in two groups of miners working at different altitudes. METHODOLOGY: A longitudinal study conducted in a private company. Hb was obtained from entrance exams and annual checks of workers at two locations: at sea level and at Peruvian highlands (4,100 m), taken by trained staff and equipment calibrated to environmental conditions. We analyzed variations in the course of the years with the PA-GEE statistical test; p values were obtained...
March 2017: Gaceta Médica de México
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471901/right-hand-weakness-and-headache-during-ascent-to-mount-everest-a-case-of-cerebral-venous-infarction
#14
Jeong Hee Kim, Soo Jeong Kim, Hahn Young Kim
INTRODUCTION: The increasing popularity of trekking in alpine regions has drawn attention to high altitude-associated health concerns. CASE REPORT: Here, we report a case of cerebral venous infarction as a consequence of a hypercoagulable state induced by secondary polycythemia as an adaptation to high altitude. CONCLUSIONS: When patients present focal neurological symptoms such as hemiparesis in addition to symptoms of acute mountain sickness or high-altitude cerebral edema such as headache, nausea, vomiting, and dizziness, cerebral venous infarction should be considered...
May 2017: Neurologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28469847/response-to-letter-to-the-editor-regarding-acute-mountain-sickness-among-tourists-visiting-the-high-altitude-city-of-lhasa-tibet-china-at-3658%C3%A2-m-above-sea-level-a-cross-sectional-study
#15
Gonggalanzi, Per Nafstad
We kindly thank the journal for the opportunity to respond to the recent comments made regarding our manuscript entitled "Acute mountain sickness among tourists visiting the high-altitude city of Lhasa, Tibet, China at 3658 m above sea level: A cross-sectional study".
2017: Archives of Public Health, Archives Belges de Santé Publique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28455198/residence-at-moderate-versus-low-altitude-is-effective-at-maintaining-higher-oxygen-saturation-during-exercise-and-reducing-acute-mountain-sickness-following-fast-ascent-to-4559-m
#16
Eva Bernardi, Luca Pomidori, Davide Cavallari, Gaia Mandolesi, Annalisa Cogo
OBJECTIVE: To continuously monitor oxygen saturation (SpO2) by pulse oximeter and assess the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS) using the Lake Louise Score (LLS) during ascent from 1154 to 4559 m in 2 groups of subjects: 10 moderate-altitude residents (MAR; ≥1000-≤2500 m) and 34 low-altitude residents (LAR). MAR are reported to have a lower incidence of AMS during ascent to higher altitudes compared with LAR. Whether this is related to higher SpO2 is still open to debate...
April 25, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28418725/medex-2015-heart-rate-variability-predicts-development-of-acute-mountain-sickness
#17
Angus Sutherland, Joseph Freer, Laura Evans, Alberto Dolci, Matteo Crotti, Jamie Hugo Macdonald
Sutherland, Angus, Joseph Freer, Laura Evans, Alberto Dolci, Matteo Crotti, and Jamie Hugo Macdonald. MEDEX 2015: Heart rate variability predicts development of acute mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2017. AIMS: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) develops when the body fails to acclimatize to atmospheric changes at altitude. Preascent prediction of susceptibility to AMS would be a useful tool to prevent subsequent harm. Changes to peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) on hypoxic exposure have previously been shown to be of poor predictive value...
April 18, 2017: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411926/advances-in-the-prevention-and-treatment-of-high-altitude-illness
#18
REVIEW
Christopher Davis, Peter Hackett
High altitude illness encompasses a spectrum of clinical entities to include: acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These illnesses occur as a result of a hypobaric hypoxic environment. Although a mild case of acute mountain sickness may be self-limited, high altitude cerebral edema and high altitude pulmonary edema represent critical emergencies that require timely intervention. This article reviews recent advances in the prevention and treatment of high altitude illness, including new pharmacologic strategies for prophylaxis and revised treatment guidelines...
May 2017: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28407652/smartphone-enabled-heart-rate-variability-and-acute-mountain-sickness
#19
Adrian Mellor, Josh Bakker-Dyos, John OʼHara, David Richard Woods, David A Holdsworth, Christopher J Boos
INTRODUCTION: The autonomic system and sympathetic activation appears integral in the pathogenesis of acute mountain sickness (AMS) at high altitude (HA), yet a link between heart rate variability (HRV) and AMS has not been convincingly shown. In this study we investigated the utility of the smartphone-derived HRV score to predict and diagnose AMS at HA. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy adults were investigated at baseline at 1400 m and over 10 days during a trek to 5140 m...
April 12, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406577/evidence-of-african-horse-sickness-virus-infection-of-equus-zebra-hartmannae-in-the-south-western-khomas-region-namibia
#20
E Becker, G J Venter, T Greyling, U Molini, H van Hamburg
Equine mortalities suspected to be due to African horse sickness (AHS) were reported from the arid Khomas Region, Namibia, in 2008. The area was previously considered a localized AHS-free area. Hartmann's mountain zebra (Equus zebra hartmannae), a potential but unconfirmed reservoir host of African horse sickness virus (AHSV), occurs in the region. Between 2009 and 2010 serum, blood and tissue samples from 31 culled E. z. hartmannae were analysed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) (n = 31) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (n = 18) to determine the presence of AHSV and/or antibodies against AHSV...
April 12, 2017: Transboundary and Emerging Diseases
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