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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913463/single-dose-intravenous-iron-for-iron-deficiency-a-new-paradigm
#1
Michael Auerbach, Thomas Deloughery
Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common hematologic problem in the world. Although oral iron is often viewed as front-line therapy, extensive published evidence has accumulated that IV iron is superior, in both efficacy and safety, to oral iron in many clinical situations and should be introduced much sooner in the treatment paradigm of iron-deficient patients. In this chapter, we will review the formulations of IV iron that allow total complete replacement doses in 1 or 2 sessions including practical tips for administration...
December 2, 2016: Hematology—the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27888818/high-altitude-illness
#2
Anna Hartman-Ksycińska, Jolanta Kluz-Zawadzka, Bogumił Lewandowski
High-altitude illness is a result of prolonged high-altitude exposure of unacclimatized individuals. The illness is seen in the form of acute mountain sickness (AMS) which if not treated leads to potentially life-threatening high altitude pulmonary oedema and high-altitude cerebral oedema. Medical problems are caused by hypobaric hypoxia stimulating hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) release. As a result, the central nervous system, circulation and respiratory system function impairment occurs. The most important factor in AMS treatment is acclimatization, withdrawing further ascent and rest or beginning to descent; oxygen supplementation, and pharmacological intervention, and, if available, a portable hyperbaric chamber...
2016: Przegla̧d Epidemiologiczny
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27847819/acute-mountain-sickness-symptoms-depend-on-normobaric-versus-hypobaric-hypoxia
#3
Dana M DiPasquale, Gary E Strangman, N Stuart Harris, Stephen R Muza
Acute mountain sickness (AMS), characterized by headache, nausea, fatigue, and dizziness when unacclimatized individuals rapidly ascend to high altitude, is exacerbated by exercise and can be disabling. Although AMS is observed in both normobaric (NH) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH), recent evidence suggests that NH and HH produce different physiological responses. We evaluated whether AMS symptoms were different in NH and HH during the initial stages of exposure and if the assessment tool mattered. Seventy-two 8 h exposures to normobaric normoxia (NN), NH, or HH were experienced by 36 subjects...
2016: BioMed Research International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27821551/senp1-drives-hypoxia-induced-polycythemia-via-gata1-and-bcl-xl-in-subjects-with-monge-s-disease
#4
Priti Azad, Huiwen W Zhao, Pedro J Cabrales, Roy Ronen, Dan Zhou, Orit Poulsen, Otto Appenzeller, Yu Hsin Hsiao, Vineet Bafna, Gabriel G Haddad
In this study, because excessive polycythemia is a predominant trait in some high-altitude dwellers (chronic mountain sickness [CMS] or Monge's disease) but not others living at the same altitude in the Andes, we took advantage of this human experiment of nature and used a combination of induced pluripotent stem cell technology, genomics, and molecular biology in this unique population to understand the molecular basis for hypoxia-induced excessive polycythemia. As compared with sea-level controls and non-CMS subjects who responded to hypoxia by increasing their RBCs modestly or not at all, respectively, CMS cells increased theirs remarkably (up to 60-fold)...
November 14, 2016: Journal of Experimental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27808057/-mountain-medicine-ii
#5
Bjørn Bay, Kasper Fjellhaugen Hjuler
Travelling to high altitudes is an increasingly popular form of recreational holiday. Individual medical advice may be essential for certain groups of individuals such as patients with chronic disorders, pregnant women or children. This is the second part in a series of two articles on mountain medicine. The first part covered high-altitude physiology and medical aspects of objective alpine dangers and the increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This part covers altitude sickness, fluid balance, nutrition, and precautions for patients with pre-existing medical conditions, pregnant women and children...
October 31, 2016: Ugeskrift for Laeger
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27788038/history-of-migraine-predicts-headache-at-high-altitude
#6
Christopher Davis, Elaine Reno, Edward Maa, Robert Roach
: Davis, Christopher, Elaine Reno, Edward Maa, and Robert Roach. History of Migraine Predicts Headache at High Altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 00:000-000, 2016.-Objective: To characterize the spectrum of headaches and their association with migraine history within a population of recreational hikers above 4300 m. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional survey design, a convenience sample of 667 hikers participated in a written survey after descent from Mount Gray/Torreys (4349 m)...
October 27, 2016: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27722064/subjective-assessment-of-acute-mountain-sickness-investigating-the-relationship-between-the-lake-louise-self-report-a-visual-analogue-scale-and-psychological-well-being-scales
#7
Anika Frühauf, Martin Burtscher, Elena Pocecco, Martin Faulhaber, Martin Kopp
PURPOSE: There is an ongoing discussion how to assess acute mountain sickness (AMS) in real life conditions. Next to more-item scales with a cut off like the Lake Louise Self-Report (LLS), some authors suggested to use visual analog scales (VAS) to assess AMS. This study tried to contribute to this question using VAS items used for the Subjective Ratings of Drug Effects, including an additional single item for AMS. Furthermore, we investigated if instruments developed to assess psychological well-being might predict AMS assessed via LLS or VAS...
2016: SpringerPlus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27692623/-estimation-of-arterial-oxygen-saturation-in-relation-to-altitude
#8
Teófilo Lorente-Aznar, Guillermo Perez-Aguilar, Alma García-Espot, Sergio Benabarre-Ciria, Juan Luis Mendia-Gorostidi, Daniel Dols-Alonso, Julia Blasco-Romero
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Arterial Oxygen Saturation (AOS) predicts altitude sickness. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the AOS values with relation to altitude. Furthermore, make a graph to use during activity which assesses the AOS for each altitude and the normal range. PATIENTS AND METHOD: Values of AOS were assessed during eight high mountain activities in the Alps, Himalaya, Caucasus and Andes; 53 mountaineers participated, 17 of them in more than one activity; 761 measurements of AOS were registered...
September 27, 2016: Medicina Clínica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27667557/blood-brain-barrier-changes-in-high-altitude
#9
José V Lafuente, Garazi Bermudez, Lorena Camargo-Arce, Susana Bulnes
Cerebral syndromes related to high-altitude exposure are becoming more frequent as the number of trips to high altitudes has increased in the last decade. The commonest symptom is headache, followed by acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), which can be fatal. The pathophysiology of these syndromes is not fully understood. The classical "tight-fit hypothesis" posits that there are some anatomical variations that would obstruct the sinovenous outflow and worsen vasogenic edema and intracranial hypertension reactive to hypoxia...
2016: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27662354/lipid-subhyaloid-maculopathy-and-exposure-to-high-altitude
#10
Roberta Rosas Petrocinio, Elga Dias Gomes
BACKGROUND: High altitude retinopathy (HAR) includes a number of diseases related to high altitude such as acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). High altitude retinopathy is mainly characterized by retinal hemorrhages, usually sparing the macular region, a condition specifically known as high altitude retinal hemorrhages (HARH). The pathogenesis of HARH is unclear. Many studies show that lack of oxygen causes an inadequate autoregulation of retinal circulation, causing vascular incompetence...
2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27660613/multiparametric-magnetic-resonance-investigation-of-brain-adaptations-to-6-days-at-4350-m
#11
Samuel Verges, Thomas Rupp, Marjorie Villien, Laurent Lamalle, Irène Troprés, Camille Poquet, Jan M Warnking, François Estève, Pierre Bouzat, Alexandre Krainik
OBJECTIVE: Hypoxic exposure in healthy subjects can induce acute mountain sickness including headache, lethargy, cerebral dysfunction, and substantial cerebral structural alterations which, in worst case, can lead to potentially fatal high altitude cerebral edema. Within this context, the relationships between high altitude-induced cerebral edema, changes in cerebral perfusion, increased brain parenchyma volume, increased intracranial pressure, and symptoms remain unclear. METHODS: In 11 subjects before and after 6 days at 4350 m, we performed multiparametric magnetic resonance investigations including anatomical, apparent diffusion coefficient and arterial spin labeling sequences...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27640135/a-higher-baseline-somatization-score-at-sea-level-as-an-independent-predictor-of-acute-mountain-sickness
#12
Shi-Zhu Bian, Jun Jin, Jun-Qing Dong, Qian-Ning Li, Jie Yu, Cai-Fa Tang, Shi-Yong Yu, Xiao-Hui Zhao, Jun Qin, Lan Huang
OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to identify the predictive values of psychological factors that are evaluated by the Symptoms Checklist-90 (SCL-90) for acute mountain sickness (AMS). METHODS: The subjects (n=285, non-acclimatized young Chinese men), who were recruited in July 2013, completed a case report questionnaire. In addition, their vital signs (heart rate [HR], blood pressure and pulse oxygen saturation) were measured, and their psychological factors were examined using the SCL-90 at sea level...
September 14, 2016: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27633944/reversible-brain-abnormalities-in-people-without-signs-of-mountain-sickness-during-high-altitude-exposure
#13
Cunxiu Fan, Yuhua Zhao, Qian Yu, Wu Yin, Haipeng Liu, Jianzhong Lin, Tianhe Yang, Ming Fan, Luobu Gesang, Jiaxing Zhang
A large proportion of lowlanders ascending to high-altitude (HA) show no signs of mountain sickness. Whether their brains have indeed suffered from HA environment and the persistent sequelae after return to lowland remain unknown. Thirty-one sea-level college students, who had a 30-day teaching on Qinghai-Tibet plateau underwent MRI scans before, during, and two months after HA exposure. Brain volume, cortical structures, and white matter microstructure were measured. Besides, serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 and neuropsychiatric behaviors were tested...
2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27627890/hypobaric-hypoxia-down-regulated-junctional-protein-complex-implications-to-vascular-leakage
#14
Dangjai Souvannakitti, Paleerath Peerapen, Visith Thongboonkerd
Acute mountain sickness (AMS) can cause capillary hyper-permeability and vasogenic edema. However, its underlying mechanisms remained unclear and there is no previous in vitro study on AMS. We therefore conducted an in vitro study and examined whether continuous hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) could alter expression of junctional protein complex of vascular endothelial cells, causing hyper-permeabilization. EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were exposed to either CHH or normoxia for up to 24 h. Flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide co-staining demonstrated that cell death had no significant difference at 12-h, but was increased by CHH at 24-h...
September 14, 2016: Cell Adhesion & Migration
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27621942/altitude-stress-during-participation-of-medical-congress
#15
EDITORIAL
Soon Bae Kim, Jong Sung Kim, Sang Jun Kim, Su Hee Cho, Dae Chul Suh
Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI...
September 2016: Neurointervention
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27605561/hypercapnic-ventilatory-response-is-decreased-in-a-mouse-model-of-excessive-erythrocytosis
#16
Sofien Laouafa, Elizabeth Elliot-Portal, Susana Revollo, Edith M Schneider Gasser, Vincent Joseph, Nicolas Voituron, Max Gassmann, Jorge Soliz
The impact of cerebral Epo in the regulation of the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HcVR) is controversial. While we reported that cerebral Epo does not affect the central chemosensitivity in C57Bl6 mice receiving an intracisternal injection of sEpoR (the endogenous antagonist of Epo), a recent study in transgenic mice with constitutive high levels of human Epo in brain and circulation (Tg6) and in brain only (Tg21), showed that Epo blunts the HcVR, maybe by interacting with central and peripheral chemoreceptors...
September 7, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27593617/effects-of-dietary-nitrate-supplementation-on-symptoms-of-acute-mountain-sickness-and-basic-physiological-responses-in-a-group-of-male-adolescents-during-ascent-to-mount-everest-base-camp
#17
Philip J Hennis, Kay Mitchell, Edward Gilbert-Kawai, Vassiliki Bountziouka, Angie Wade, Martin Feelisch, Michael P Grocott, Daniel S Martin
: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary nitrate supplementation, in the form of beetroot juice, on acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms and physiological responses, in a group of young males trekking to Mount Everest Base Camp (EBC). Forty healthy male students (mean age (SD): 16 (1) yrs) trekked to EBC over 11 days. Following an overnight fast, each morning participants completed the Lake Louise AMS questionnaire and underwent a series of physiological tests: resting blood pressure as well as resting and exercising heart rate, respiratory rate, and peripheral oxygen saturation...
September 2, 2016: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27548274/brief-working-memory-and-physiological-monitoring-during-a-high-altitude-expedition
#18
Carine Malle, Benoît Ginon, Cyprien Bourrilhon
: Malle, Carine, Benoît Ginon, and Cyprien Bourrilhon. Brief working memory and physiological monitoring during a high-altitude expedition. High Alt Med Biol 00:000-000, 2016. BACKGROUND: Various studies have shown the deleterious effects of high-altitude hypoxia on cognitive functions, including attention and memory. Since optimal cognitive abilities may be crucial for mountain safety, this study was aimed to assess the relevance of a brief working memory test to quickly assess cognition at high altitude...
August 22, 2016: High Altitude Medicine & Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27548190/acceptability-safety-and-efficacy-of-oral-administration-of-extracts-of-black-or-red-maca-lepidium-meyenii-in-adult-human-subjects-a-randomized-double-blind-placebo-controlled-study
#19
Carla Gonzales-Arimborgo, Irma Yupanqui, Elsa Montero, Dulce E Alarcón-Yaquetto, Alisson Zevallos-Concha, Lidia Caballero, Manuel Gasco, Jianping Zhao, Ikhlas A Khan, Gustavo F Gonzales
The plant maca, grown at 4000 m altitude in the Peruvian Central Andes, contains hypocotyls that have been used as food and in traditional medicine for centuries. The aim of this research was to provide results on some health effects of oral administration of spray-dried extracts of black or red maca (Lepidium meyenii) in adult human subjects living at low (LA) and high altitude (HA). A total of 175 participants were given 3 g of either placebo, black, or red maca extract daily for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes in sexual desire, mood, energy, health-related quality of life score (HRQL), and chronic mountain sickness (CMS) score, or in glycaemia, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels...
August 18, 2016: Pharmaceuticals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27529318/effects-of-acute-profound-hypoxia-on-healthy-humans-implications-for-safety-of-tests-evaluating-pulse-oximetry-or-tissue-oximetry-performance
#20
Philip E Bickler, John R Feiner, Michael S Lipnick, Paul Batchelder, David B MacLeod, John W Severinghaus
Extended periods of oxygen deprivation can produce acidosis, inflammation, energy failure, cell stress, or cell death. However, brief profound hypoxia (here defined as SaO2 50%-70% for approximately 10 minutes) is not associated with cardiovascular compromise and is tolerated by healthy humans without apparent ill effects. In contrast, chronic hypoxia induces a suite of adaptations and stresses that can result in either increased tolerance of hypoxia or disease, as in adaptation to altitude or in the syndrome of chronic mountain sickness...
August 12, 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
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