Read by QxMD icon Read

Skin microbiome

Walter H Moos, Carl A Pinkert, Michael H Irwin, Douglas V Faller, Krishna Kodukula, Ioannis P Glavas, Kosta Steliou
Preclinical Research Approximately 2,500 years ago, Hippocrates used the word herpes as a medical term to describe lesions that appeared to creep or crawl on the skin, advocating heat as a possible treatment. During the last 50 years, pharmaceutical research has made great strides, and therapeutic options have expanded to include small molecule antiviral agents, protease inhibitors, preventive vaccines for a handful of the papillomaviruses, and even cures for hepatitis C virus infections. However, effective treatments for persistent and recurrent viral infections, particularly the highly prevalent herpesviruses, continue to represent a significant unmet medical need, affecting the majority of the world's population...
October 20, 2016: Drug Development Research
Jay-Hyun Jo, Elizabeth A Kennedy, Heidi H Kong
Skin constantly encounters external elements, including microbes. Culture-based studies have identified fungi present on human skin and have linked some species with certain skin diseases. Moreover, modern medical treatments, especially immunosuppressants, have increased the population at risk for cutaneous and invasive fungal infections, emphasizing the need to understand skin fungal communities in health and disease. A major hurdle for studying fungal flora at a community level has been the heterogeneous culture conditions required by skin fungi...
October 18, 2016: Virulence
Jatinder Singh, Ryan C Johnson, Carey D Schlett, Emad M Elassal, Katrina B Crawford, Deepika Mor, Jeffrey B Lanier, Natasha N Law, William A Walters, Nimfa Teneza-Mora, Jason W Bennett, Eric R Hall, Eugene V Millar, Michael W Ellis, D Scott Merrell
Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common in the general population, with increased prevalence among military trainees. Previous research has revealed numerous nasal microbial signatures that correlate with SSTI development and Staphylococcus aureus colonization. Thus, we hypothesized that the ecology of the inguinal, oropharynx, and perianal regions may also be altered in response to SSTI and/or S. aureus colonization. We collected body site samples from 46 military trainees with purulent abscess (SSTI group) as well as from 66 asymptomatic controls (non-SSTI group)...
September 2016: MSphere
Zhenping Wang, Nicholas Mascarenhas, Lars Eckmann, Yukiko Miyamoto, Xiaojun Sun, Toshiaki Kawakami, Anna Di Nardo
BACKGROUND: Mast cell (MC) progenitors leave the bone marrow, enter the circulation, and settle in the skin and other tissues. Their maturation in tissues is influenced by the surrounding microenvironment. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that environmental factors play a role in MC maturation in the skin. METHODS: MCs were numerically, phenotypically, and functionally compared between germ-free (GF), SPF, and GF mice reconstituted with microbiota...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
B Dréno, E Araviiskaia, E Berardesca, G Gontijo, M Sanchez Viera, L F Xiang, R Martin, T Bieber
The skin is a complex barrier organ made of a symbiotic relationship between microbial communities and host tissue via complex signals provided by the innate and the adaptive immune systems. It is constantly exposed to various endogenous and exogenous factors which impact this balanced system potentially leading to inflammatory skin conditions comprising infections, allergies or autoimmune diseases. Unlike the gut and stool microbiome which has been studied and described for many years, investigations on the skin or scalp microbiome only started recently...
October 13, 2016: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
Rosamond Rhodes
The human microbiome is the collection of bacteria, viruses, and fungi that live on and in the human organism's skin, mucosa, and intestinal tract. Re-examining commonly accepted ethical standards from the perspective of this new area of research provides an opportunity to reassess our current thinking about research regulations as well as the importance of some principles and distinctions. In this commentary, I explain ethical issues illuminated by research on the human microbiome related to personal identity, privacy, property, research ethics, public health, and biobanks...
October 12, 2016: BMC Medicine
Deirdre L Church
Alteration in the host microbiome at skin and mucosal surfaces plays a role in the function of the immune system, and may predispose immunocompromised patients to infection. Because obligate anaerobes are the predominant type of bacteria present in humans at skin and mucosal surfaces, immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for serious invasive infection due to anaerobes. Laboratory approaches to the diagnosis of anaerobe infections that occur due to pyogenic, polymicrobial, or toxin-producing organisms are described...
August 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
E Peel, Y Cheng, J T Djordjevic, S Fox, T C Sorrell, K Belov
Tasmanian devil joeys, like other marsupials, are born at a very early stage of development, prior to the development of their adaptive immune system, yet survive in a pathogen-laden pouch and burrow. Antimicrobial peptides, called cathelicidins, which provide innate immune protection during early life, are expressed in the pouch lining, skin and milk of devil dams. These peptides are active against pathogens identified in the pouch microbiome. Of the six characterised cathelicidins, Saha-CATH5 and 6 have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and are capable of killing problematic human pathogens including methicillin-resistant S...
October 11, 2016: Scientific Reports
Patrick L J M Zeeuwen, Thomas H A Ederveen, Danique A van der Krieken, Hanna Niehues, Jos Boekhorst, Sanja Kezic, Daniëlle A T Hanssen, Marisol E Otero, Ivonne M J J van Vlijmen-Willems, Diana Rodijk-Olthuis, Denise Falcone, Ellen H J van den Bogaard, Marijke Kamsteeg, Heleen D de Koning, Manon E J Zeeuwen-Franssen, Maurice A M van Steensel, Michiel Kleerebezem, Harro M Timmerman, Sacha A F T van Hijum, Joost Schalkwijk
Mutations in the filaggrin gene, which cause the skin disease ichthyosis vulgaris and are a genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis, alter the cutaneous microbiome thereby affecting keratinocyte host defense responses following skin barrier disruption.
October 7, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Marie Chantal Lemfack, Srinivasa Rao Ravella, Nicola Lorenz, Marco Kai, Kirsten Jung, Stefan Schulz, Birgit Piechulla
The skin microbiota is import for body protection. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of the volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles of typical skin-resident corynebacterial and staphylococcal species. The VOC profile of Staphylococcus schleiferi DSMZ 4807 was of particular interest as it is dominated by two compounds, 3-(phenylamino)butan-2-one and 3-(phenylimino)butan-2-one (schleiferon A and B, respectively). Neither of these has previously been reported from natural sources. Schleiferon A and B inhibited the growth of various Gram-positive species and affected two quorum-sensing-dependent phenotypes - prodigiosin accumulation and bioluminescence - of Gram-negative bacteria...
September 27, 2016: Systematic and Applied Microbiology
Inmaculada Moreno, Francisco M Codoñer, Felipe Vilella, Diana Valbuena, Juan F Martinez-Blanch, Jorge Jimenez-Almazán, Roberto Alonso, Pilar Alamá, Jose Remohí, Antonio Pellicer, Daniel Ramon, Carlos Simon
BACKGROUND: Bacterial cells in the human body account for 1-3% of total body weight and are at least equal in number to human cells. Recent research has focused on understanding how the different bacterial communities in the body (eg, gut, respiratory, skin, and vaginal microbiomes) predispose to health and disease. The microbiota of the reproductive tract has been inferred from the vaginal bacterial communities, and the uterus has been classically considered a sterile cavity. However, while the vaginal microbiota has been investigated in depth, there is a paucity of consistent data regarding the existence of an endometrial microbiota and its possible impact in reproductive function...
October 4, 2016: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Thuy Doan, Lakshmi Akileswaran, Dallin Andersen, Benjamin Johnson, Narae Ko, Angira Shrestha, Valery Shestopalov, Cecilia S Lee, Aaron Y Lee, Russell N Van Gelder
Purpose: To characterize the ocular surface microbiome of healthy volunteers using a combination of microbial culture and high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques. Methods: Conjunctival swab samples from 107 healthy volunteers were analyzed by bacterial culture, 16S rDNA gene deep sequencing (n = 89), and biome representational in silico karyotyping (BRiSK; n = 80). Swab samples of the facial skin (n = 42), buccal mucosa (n = 50), and environmental controls (n = 27) were processed in parallel...
October 1, 2016: Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
Virginie Lemieux-Labonté, Nicolas Tromas, B Jesse Shapiro, François-Joseph Lapointe
BACKGROUND: A wide range of microorganisms inhabit animal skin. This microbial community (microbiome) plays an important role in host defense against pathogens and disease. Bats (Chiroptera: Mammalia) are an ecologically and evolutionarily diversified group with a relatively unexplored skin microbiome. The bat skin microbiome could play a role in disease resistance, for example, to white nose syndrome (WNS), an infection which has been devastating North American bat populations. However, fundamental knowledge of the bat skin microbiome is needed before understanding its role in health and disease resistance...
2016: PeerJ
Muthukrishnan Eaaswarkhanth, Duo Xu, Colin Flanagan, Margarita Rzhetskaya, M Geoffrey Hayes, Ran Blekhman, Nina Jablonski, Omer Gokcumen
Human skin has evolved rapidly, leaving evolutionary signatures in the genome. The filaggrin (FLG) gene is widely studied for its skin-barrier function in humans. The extensive genetic variation in this gene, especially common loss-of-function (LoF) mutations, has been established as primary risk factors for atopic dermatitis. To investigate the evolution of this gene, we analyzed 2,504 human genomes and genotyped the copy number variation of filaggrin repeats within FLG in 126 individuals from diverse ancestral backgrounds...
September 27, 2016: Genome Biology and Evolution
Obed Hernández-Gómez, Steven J A Kimble, Jeffrey T Briggler, Rod N Williams
Pathogens currently threaten the existence of many amphibian species. In efforts to combat global declines, researchers have characterized the amphibian cutaneous microbiome as a resource for disease management. Characterization of microbial communities has become useful in studying the links between organismal health and the host microbiome. Hellbender salamanders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) provide an ideal system to explore the cutaneous microbiome as this species requires extensive conservation management across its range...
September 27, 2016: Microbial Ecology
Moreno Zolfo, Adrian Tett, Olivier Jousson, Claudio Donati, Nicola Segata
Metagenomic characterization of microbial communities has the potential to become a tool to identify pathogens in human samples. However, software tools able to extract strain-level typing information from metagenomic data are needed. Low-throughput molecular typing schema such as Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) are still widely used and provide a wealth of strain-level information that is currently not exploited by metagenomic methods. We introduce MetaMLST, a software tool that reconstructs the MLST loci of microorganisms present in microbial communities from metagenomic data...
September 19, 2016: Nucleic Acids Research
James T Rosenbaum, Mark J Asquith
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The microbiome is the term that describes the microbial ecosystem that cohabits an organism such as humans. The microbiome has been implicated in a long list of immune-mediated diseases which include rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and even gout. The mechanisms to account for this effect are multiple. The clinical implications from observations on the microbiome and disease are broad. RECENT FINDINGS: A growing number of microbiota constituents such as Prevotella copri, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Collinsella have been correlated or causally related to rheumatic disease...
October 2016: Current Rheumatology Reports
Manuel Ferrer, Celia Méndez-García, David Rojo, Coral Barbas, Andrés Moya
Our microbiome should be understood as one of the most complex components of the human body. The use of β-lactam antibiotics is one of the microbiome covariates that influence its composition. The extent to which our microbiota changes after an antibiotic intervention depends not only on the chemical nature of the antibiotic or cocktail of antibiotics used to treat specific infections, but also on the type of administration, duration and dose, as well as the level of resistance that each microbiota develops...
September 15, 2016: Biochemical Pharmacology
Casey L Edwards, Phillip G Byrne, Peter Harlow, Aimee J Silla
The rapid spread of infectious disease has resulted in the decline of animal populations globally. Amphibians support a diversity of microbial symbionts on their skin surface that help to inhibit pathogen colonisation and reduce disease susceptibility and virulence. These cutaneous microbial communities represent an important component of amphibian immune defence, however, very little is known about the environmental factors that influence the cutaneous microbiome. Here, we characterise the cutaneous bacterial communities of a captive colony of the critically endangered Australian southern corroboree frog, Pseudophyrne corroboree, and examine the effect of dietary carotenoid supplementation on bacterial abundance, species richness and community composition...
September 13, 2016: Microbial Ecology
Pamela Ferretti, Stefania Farina, Mario Cristofolini, Giampiero Girolomoni, Adrian Tett, Nicola Segata
The skin is the largest organ in the human body and it is populated by a large diversity of microbes, most of which are co-evolved with the host and live in symbiotic harmony. There is increasing evidence that the skin microbiome plays a crucial role in the defence against pathogens, immune system training and homeostasis, and microbiome perturbations have been associated with pathological skin conditions. Studying the skin resident microbial community is thus essential to better understand the microbiome-host crosstalk and to associate its specific configurations with cutaneous diseases...
September 13, 2016: Experimental Dermatology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"