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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28690938/alexia-without-agraphia-a-rare-entity
#1
Chintan Rupareliya, Syeda Naqvi, Seyedali Hejazi
Pure alexia refers to an acquired disorder associated with the damage to medial occipitotemporal gyrus in the dominant hemisphere, which is also known as visual word form area (VWFA). VWFA is involved in rapid word recognition and fluent reading. Alexia without agraphia is a disconnection syndrome that occurs when the splenium is also damaged with the occipital lobe on a dominant side. We report a case of a 72-year-old right-handed male who presented with alexia without agraphia accompanied by right homonymous hemianopia resulting from acute infarct of the left occipital lobe, the splenium of the corpus callosum and posterior thalamus that probably occurred on the previous day...
June 2, 2017: Curēus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28690507/the-relationship-between-intrinsic-couplings-of-the-visual-word-form-area-with-spoken-language-network-and-reading-ability-in-children-and-adults
#2
Yu Li, Linjun Zhang, Zhichao Xia, Jie Yang, Hua Shu, Ping Li
Reading plays a key role in education and communication in modern society. Learning to read establishes the connections between the visual word form area (VWFA) and language areas responsible for speech processing. Using resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) and Granger Causality Analysis (GCA) methods, the current developmental study aimed to identify the difference in the relationship between the connections of VWFA-language areas and reading performance in both adults and children. The results showed that: (1) the spontaneous connectivity between VWFA and the spoken language areas, i...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539071/the-location-and-effects-of-visual-hemisphere-specific-stimulation-on-reading-fluency-in-children-with-the-characteristics-of-dyslexia
#3
Bobbie Jean Koen, Jacqueline Hawkins, Xi Zhu, Ben Jansen, Weihua Fan, Sharon Johnson
Fluency is used as an indicator of reading proficiency. Many students with reading disabilities are unable to benefit from typical interventions. This study is designed to replicate Lorusso, Facoetti, Paganoni, Pezzani, and Molteni's (2006) work using FlashWord, a computer program that tachistoscopically presents words in the right or left visual hemi-field in English and locates through fMRI imaging the processing areas involved in fluency development. Our participants were 15 students who were ages 8 to 19 years and had reading disabilities randomly assigned to Intervention ( n = 9) and Delayed Intervention ( n = 6) groups...
May 1, 2017: Journal of Learning Disabilities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28450544/privileged-functional-connectivity-between-the-visual-word-form-area-and-the-language-system
#4
W Dale Stevens, Dwight J Kravitz, Cynthia S Peng, Michael Henry Tessler, Alex Martin
The visual word form area (VWFA) is a region in the left occipitotemporal sulcus of literate individuals that is purportedly specialized for visual word recognition. However, there is considerable controversy about its functional specificity and connectivity, with some arguing that it serves as a domain-general, rather than word-specific, visual processor. The VWFA is a critical region for testing hypotheses about the nature of cortical organization, because it is known to develop only through experience (i...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411527/development-of-sensitivity-versus-specificity-for-print-in-the-visual-word-form-area
#5
Tracy M Centanni, Livia W King, Marianna D Eddy, Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli, John D E Gabrieli
An area near the left lateral occipito-temporal sulcus that responds preferentially to print has been designated as the visual word form area (VWFA). Research suggests that specialization in this brain region increases as reading expertise is achieved. Here we aimed to characterize that development in terms of sensitivity (response to printed words relative to non-linguistic faces) versus specificity (response to printed words versus line drawings of nameable objects) in typically reading children ages 7-14 versus young adults as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)...
July 2017: Brain and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28396097/an-fmri-study-of-visual-hemifield-integration-and-cerebral-lateralization
#6
Lars Strother, Zhiheng Zhou, Alexandra K Coros, Tutis Vilis
The human brain integrates hemifield-split visual information via interhemispheric transfer. The degree to which neural circuits involved in this process behave differently during word recognition as compared to object recognition is not known. Evidence from neuroimaging (fMRI) suggests that interhemispheric transfer during word viewing converges in the left hemisphere, in two distinct brain areas, an "occipital word form area" (OWFA) and a more anterior occipitotemporal "visual word form area" (VWFA). We used a novel fMRI half-field repetition technique to test whether or not these areas also integrate nonverbal hemifield-split string stimuli of similar visual complexity...
June 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326293/pily1-promotes-legionella-pneumophila-infection-of-human-lung-tissue-explants-and-contributes-to-bacterial-adhesion-host-cell-invasion-and-twitching-motility
#7
Julia Hoppe, Can M Ünal, Stefanie Thiem, Louisa Grimpe, Torsten Goldmann, Nikolaus Gaßler, Matthias Richter, Olga Shevchuk, Michael Steinert
Legionnaires' disease is an acute fibrinopurulent pneumonia. During infection Legionella pneumophila adheres to the alveolar lining and replicates intracellularly within recruited macrophages. Here we provide a sequence and domain composition analysis of the L. pneumophila PilY1 protein, which has a high homology to PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PilY1 proteins of both pathogens contain a von Willebrand factor A (vWFa) and a C-terminal PilY domain. Using cellular fractionation, we assigned the L. pneumophila PilY1 as an outer membrane protein that is only expressed during the transmissive stationary growth phase...
2017: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28099493/different-phenotypes-of-the-two-chinese-probands-with-the-same-c-889g-a-p-c162y-mutation-in-coch-gene-verify-different-mechanisms-underlying-autosomal-dominant-nonsyndromic-deafness-9
#8
Qi Wang, Peipei Fei, Hongbo Gu, Yanmei Zhang, Xiaomei Ke, Yuhe Liu
OBJECTIVES: By analyzing the different phenotypes of two Chinese DFNA9 families with the same mutation located in the intervening region between the LCCL and vWFA domains of cochlin and testing the functional changes in the mutant cochlin, we investigated the different pathogeneses for mutations in LCCL and vWFA domains. METHODS: Targeted next-generation sequencing for deafness-related genes was used to identify the mutation in the proband in family #208. The probands of family #208 and family #32 with the same p...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011250/shared-orthographic-neuronal-representations-for-spelling-and-reading
#9
Jeremy J Purcell, Xiong Jiang, Guinevere F Eden
A central question in the study of the neural basis of written language is whether reading and spelling utilize shared orthographic representations. While recent studies employing fMRI to test this question report that the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and ventral occipitotemporal cortex (vOTC) are active during both spelling and reading in the same subjects (Purcell et al., 2011a; Rapp and Lipka, 2011), the spatial resolution of fMRI limits the interpretation of these findings. Specifically, it is unknown if the neurons which encode orthography for reading are also involved in spelling of the same words...
February 15, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27695434/neural-mechanisms-of-dorsal-and-ventral-visual-regions-during-text-reading
#10
Wei Zhou, Xiaojuan Wang, Zhichao Xia, Yanchao Bi, Ping Li, Hua Shu
When reading a narrative text, both the dorsal and ventral visual systems are activated. To illustrate the patterns of interactions between the dorsal and ventral visual systems in text reading, we conducted analyses of functional connectivity (FC) and effective connectivity (EC) in a left-hemispheric network for reading-driven functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data. In reading-driven fMRI (Experiment 1), we found significant FCs among the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG), the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and the visual word form area (VWFA), and there were top-down effects from the left MFG to the left IPS, from the left MFG to the VWFA, and from the left IPS to the VWFA...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27500407/connectivity-precedes-function-in-the-development-of-the-visual-word-form-area
#11
Zeynep M Saygin, David E Osher, Elizabeth S Norton, Deanna A Youssoufian, Sara D Beach, Jenelle Feather, Nadine Gaab, John D E Gabrieli, Nancy Kanwisher
What determines the cortical location at which a given functionally specific region will arise in development? We tested the hypothesis that functionally specific regions develop in their characteristic locations because of pre-existing differences in the extrinsic connectivity of that region to the rest of the brain. We exploited the visual word form area (VWFA) as a test case, scanning children with diffusion and functional imaging at age 5, before they learned to read, and at age 8, after they learned to read...
September 2016: Nature Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27435995/visual-experience-shapes-orthographic-representations-in-the-visual-word-form-area
#12
Heinz Wimmer, Philipp Ludersdorfer, Fabio Richlan, Martin Kronbichler
Current neurocognitive research suggests that the efficiency of visual word recognition rests on abstract memory representations of written letters and words stored in the visual word form area (VWFA) in the left ventral occipitotemporal cortex. These representations are assumed to be invariant to visual characteristics such as font and case. In the present functional MRI study, we tested this assumption by presenting written words and varying the case format of the initial letter of German nouns (which are always capitalized) as well as German adjectives and adverbs (both usually in lowercase)...
September 2016: Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27422538/brain-mechanisms-of-recovery-from-pure-alexia-a-single-case-study-with-multiple-longitudinal-scans
#13
Laurent Cohen, Stanislas Dehaene, Samantha McCormick, Szonya Durant, Johannes M Zanker
Pure alexia is an acquired reading disorder, typically due to a left occipito-temporal lesion affecting the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA). It is unclear whether the VWFA acts as a unique bottleneck for reading, or whether alternative routes are available for recovery. Here, we address this issue through the single-case longitudinal study of a neuroscientist who experienced pure alexia and participated in 17 behavioral, 9 anatomical, and 9 fMRI assessment sessions over a period of two years. The origin of the impairment was assigned to a small left fusiform lesion, accompanied by a loss of VWFA responsivity and by the degeneracy of the associated white matter pathways...
October 2016: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27252037/uncovering-phonological-and-orthographic-selectivity-across-the-reading-network-using-fmri-ra
#14
Laurie S Glezer, Guinevere Eden, Xiong Jiang, Megan Luetje, Eileen Napoliello, Judy Kim, Maximilian Riesenhuber
Reading has been shown to rely on a dorsal brain circuit involving the temporoparietal cortex (TPC) for grapheme-to-phoneme conversion of novel words (Pugh et al., 2001), and a ventral stream involving left occipitotemporal cortex (OTC) (in particular in the so-called "visual word form area", VWFA) for visual identification of familiar words. In addition, portions of the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) have been posited to be an output of the dorsal reading pathway involved in phonology. While this dorsal versus ventral dichotomy for phonological and orthographic processing of words is widely accepted, it is not known if these brain areas are actually strictly sensitive to orthographic or phonological information...
September 2016: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27180002/distinct-preference-for-spatial-frequency-content-in-ventral-stream-regions-underlying-the-recognition-of-scenes-faces-bodies-and-other-objects
#15
Nádia Canário, Lília Jorge, M F Loureiro Silva, Mário Alberto Soares, Miguel Castelo-Branco
The ventral visual pathway receives both inputs from parvocellular and magnocellular pathways, and combines information from distinct high and low spatial frequency channels (HSF and LSF). Using a random effects region of interest general linear model approach (n=21), we aimed to compare the selectivity to different spatial frequency channels in eight key areas involved in visual object recognition: FFA, OFA, and STS, for face processing; FBA, and EBA as body selective regions; (dorsal and ventral) LOC for object perception; PPA for processing information of places and VWFA as a region which responds to written verbal material...
July 1, 2016: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27061464/dyslexic-brain-activation-abnormalities-in-deep-and-shallow-orthographies-a-meta-analysis-of-28-functional-neuroimaging-studies
#16
Anna Martin, Martin Kronbichler, Fabio Richlan
We used coordinate-based meta-analysis to objectively quantify commonalities and differences of dyslexic functional brain abnormalities between alphabetic languages differing in orthographic depth. Specifically, we compared foci of under- and overactivation in dyslexic readers relative to nonimpaired readers reported in 14 studies in deep orthographies (DO: English) and in 14 studies in shallow orthographies (SO: Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish). The separate meta-analyses of the two sets of studies showed universal reading-related dyslexic underactivation in the left occipitotemporal cortex (including the visual word form area (VWFA))...
July 2016: Human Brain Mapping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27012502/chinese-character-and-english-word-processing-in-children-s-ventral-occipitotemporal-cortex-fmri-evidence-for-script-invariance
#17
Anthony J Krafnick, Li-Hai Tan, D Lynn Flowers, Megan M Luetje, Eileen M Napoliello, Wai-Ting Siok, Charles Perfetti, Guinevere F Eden
Learning to read is thought to involve the recruitment of left hemisphere ventral occipitotemporal cortex (OTC) by a process of "neuronal recycling", whereby object processing mechanisms are co-opted for reading. Under the same theoretical framework, it has been proposed that the visual word form area (VWFA) within OTC processes orthographic stimuli independent of culture and writing systems, suggesting that it is universally involved in written language. However, this "script invariance" has yet to be demonstrated in monolingual readers of two different writing systems studied under the same experimental conditions...
June 2016: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26976813/massive-cortical-reorganization-in-sighted-braille-readers
#18
Katarzyna Siuda-Krzywicka, Łukasz Bola, Małgorzata Paplińska, Ewa Sumera, Katarzyna Jednoróg, Artur Marchewka, Magdalena W Śliwińska, Amir Amedi, Marcin Szwed
The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)...
March 15, 2016: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26791206/intrinsic-functional-connectivity-in-the-adult-brain-and-success-in-second-language-learning
#19
Xiaoqian J Chai, Jonathan A Berken, Elise B Barbeau, Jennika Soles, Megan Callahan, Jen-Kai Chen, Denise Klein
There is considerable variability in an individual's ability to acquire a second language (L2) during adulthood. Using resting-state fMRI data acquired before training in English speakers who underwent a 12 week intensive French immersion training course, we investigated whether individual differences in intrinsic resting-state functional connectivity relate to a person's ability to acquire an L2. We focused on two key aspects of language processing--lexical retrieval in spontaneous speech and reading speed--and computed whole-brain functional connectivity from two regions of interest in the language network, namely the left anterior insula/frontal operculum (AI/FO) and the visual word form area (VWFA)...
January 20, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26774610/orthographic-processing-deficits-in-developmental-dyslexia-beyond-the-ventral-visual-stream
#20
Marianna Boros, Jean-Luc Anton, Catherine Pech-Georgel, Jonathan Grainger, Marcin Szwed, Johannes C Ziegler
Fast effortless reading has been associated with the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA), a region in the ventral visual stream that specializes in the recognition of letter strings. Several neuroimaging studies of dyslexia revealed an underactivation of this region. However, most of these studies used reading tasks and/or were carried out on adults. Given that fluent reading is severely impaired in dyslexics, any underactivation might simply reflect a well-established reading deficit in impaired readers and could be the consequence rather than the cause of dyslexia...
March 2016: NeuroImage
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