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focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

Zhenhua Miao, Linda S Ertl, Dale Newland, Bin Zhao, Yu Wang, Xiaoping Zang, James J Campbell, Xiaoli Liu, Ton Dang, Shichang Miao, Antoni Krasinski, Sreenivas Punna, Yibin Zeng, Jeffrey McMahon, Penglie Zhang, Israel F Charo, Thomas J Schall, Rajinder Singh
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) comprises a group of uncommon disorders that present with marked proteinuria, nephrotic syndrome, progressive renal failure and characteristic glomerular lesions on histopathology. The current standard of care for patients with FSGS include immunosuppressive drugs such as glucocorticoids followed by calcineurin inhibitors, if needed for intolerance or inadequate response to glucocorticoids. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) blockers are also used to control proteinuria, an important signature of FSGS...
2018: PloS One
Jae Won Yang, Anne Katrin Dettmar, Andreas Kronbichler, Heon Yung Gee, Moin Saleem, Seong Heon Kim, Jae Il Shin
In the last decade, great advances have been made in understanding the genetic basis for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Animal models using specific gene disruption of the slit diaphragm and cytoskeleton of the foot process mirror the etiology of the human disease. Many animal models have been developed to understand the complex pathophysiology of FSGS. Therefore, we need to know the usefulness and exact methodology of creating animal models. Here, we review classic animal models and newly developed genetic animal models...
March 20, 2018: Clinical and Experimental Nephrology
Michelangelo Nigro, Davide Viggiano, Vincenzo Ragone, Tiziana Trabace, Annamaria di Palma, Michele Rossini, Giovambattista Capasso, Loreto Gesualdo, Giuseppe Gigliotti
BACKGROUND: The classical approach to the analysis of kidney biopsies is based on semi-quantitative scores of the amount of sclerosis, inflammatory infiltrate, fibrosis and vascular damage. However, advanced renal lesions may be accompanied by a paucity of clinical features and, conversely, important clinical abnormalities may be accompanied by minimal histopathological changes. The objective of this study is to correlate new, semiautomatic, quantitative features of kidney biopsies (e...
March 14, 2018: BMC Nephrology
Jia-Yue Zhang, Minxian Wang, Lei Tian, Giulio Genovese, Paul Yan, James G Wilson, Ravi Thadhani, Amy K Mottl, Gerald B Appel, Alexander G Bick, Matthew G Sampson, Seth L Alper, David J Friedman, Martin R Pollak
People of recent African ancestry develop kidney disease at much higher rates than most other groups. Two specific coding variants in the Apolipoprotein-L1 gene APOL1 termed G1 and G2 are the causal drivers of much of this difference in risk, following a recessive pattern of inheritance. However, most individuals with a high-risk APOL1 genotype do not develop overt kidney disease, prompting interest in identifying those factors that interact with APOL1 We performed an admixture mapping study to identify genetic modifiers of APOL1 -associated kidney disease...
March 12, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Yue Yang, Zheng Zhang, Li Zhuo, Da-Peng Chen, Wen-Ge Li
Background: Chronic kidney disease has become a leading public health concern in China, as it is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs. However, the overall situation regarding common glomerular diseases in China remains unclear. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess the national profile of the common types of glomerulonephritis in China. Methods: We searched Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, CNKI, SinoMed, VIP, and Wanfang databases for English and Chinese language articles from inception to September 2017...
March 20, 2018: Chinese Medical Journal
V Muthu, R Ramachandran, R Nada, V Kumar, M Rathi, H S Kohli, V Jha, K L Gupta, V Sakhuja
The spectrum of biopsy-proven glomerular disease was studied from a single center in Northwestern India, among adolescents aged 13-19 years. From January 2009 to December 2012, a total of 177 patients with biopsy-proven glomerular disease were studied. The same pathologist reported all the biopsy specimens after subjecting to light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. The clinical profile and laboratory findings of the patients were correlated with the histopathological spectrum of glomerular diseases...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Nephrology
Heba Mostafa Ahmed, Dina Ahmed Ezzat, Noha A Doudar, Mai Adel
INTRODUCTION: Early diagnosis of minimal change disease (MCD) is challenging in nephrotic children. CD80 is a protein expressed on the surface of podocytes associated with nephrotic syndrome and it is implicated in the induction of proteinuria. This study aimed to investigate the use of urinary CD80 for the diagnosis of MCD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Urinary CD80 levels were evaluated in 36 children with nephrotic syndrome and normal glomerular filtration rate. They were divided into three groups of MCD (n = 21), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (n = 9), and other glomerulopathies (n = 6)...
March 2018: Iranian Journal of Kidney Diseases
Gabriel Cara-Fuentes, Miguel A Lanaspa, Gabriela E Garcia, Mindy Banks, Eduardo H Garin, Richard J Johnson
Minimal Change Disease (MCD) is the most common type of nephrotic syndrome in children. The etiology has remained unknown, although it is commonly thought to be due to an unknown circulating factor that triggers podocyte dysfunction. To date, several changes in podocytes have been reported in MCD, of which one is the expression of CD80, also known as B7.1, which is a costimulatory molecule that is normally expressed on antigen -presenting cells. Some studies suggest that subjects with steroid-sensitive MCD may express CD80 in their podocytes during relapse and that this expression is associated with high urinary levels of CD80...
March 1, 2018: Pediatric Nephrology: Journal of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association
Shojiro Watanabe, Tomomi Aizawa, Hiroyasu Tsukaguchi, Koji Tsugawa, Kazushi Tsuruga, Akemi Shono, Kandai Nozu, Kazumoto Iijima, Kensuke Joh, Hiroshi Tanaka
Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing for clinical genetic testing have revealed novel disease-causing genes, such as Crumbs homolog 2 (CRB2) for early-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). We report the long-term clinicopathologic observation of a Japanese female patient with SRNS caused by a newly identified compound heterozygous mutation of CRB2 (p.Arg628Cys and p.Gly839Trp located in the 10th and 11th epidermal growth factor-like domains, respectively). She was initially examined during a mass urinary mass screening for 3...
February 23, 2018: Nephrology
Bedra Sharif, Moumita Barua
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The widespread adoption of next-generation sequencing by research and clinical laboratories has begun to uncover the previously unknown genetic basis of many diseases. In nephrology, one of the best examples of this is seen in focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and nephrotic syndrome. We review advances made in 2017 as a result of human and molecular genetic studies as it relates to FSGS and nephrotic syndrome. RECENT FINDINGS: There are more than 50 monogenic genes described in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and FSGS, with seven reported in 2017...
February 19, 2018: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension
Afnan A Alsahli, Sara I Alshahwan, Amal O Alotaibi, Khaled O Alsaad, Nourah Aloudah, Mahfooz Farooqui, Abdullah A Al Sayyari
The association between Alport's syndrome (AS) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in the same patient is complex and rarely reported. We report a case of a 42-year-old male presenting with proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, elevated serum creatinine and hypertension with unremarkable physical examination apart from obesity. The renal biopsy showed well-established FSGS pattern of injury with mild interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, while the electron microscopic examination demonstrated glomerular basement membranes (GBM) changes compatible with AS...
January 2018: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
Kawmadi W Gunawardena, Eranga S Wijewickrama, Carukshi Arambepola, Rushika D Lanerolle
Prevalence of different glomerulonephritides and their clinical course vary geographically. Our objectives are to assess the prevalence of different histological types of glomerulonephritis (GN) based on the light microscopic histology and to assess their progression according to histological type. A retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out among adult patients (>18 years) with a histological diagnosis of GN at the University Professorial Unit over a period of six months. Information including demographic data, renal biopsy findings, and progression of the disease through serum creatinine (SCr) level were collected through existing clinic records of consenting patients...
January 2018: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
Mirela Maier, Cindy Baldwin, Lamine Aoudjit, Tomoko Takano
Nephrotic syndrome is a kidney disease featured by heavy proteinuria. It is caused by injury to the specialized epithelial cells called "podocytes" within the filtration unit of the kidney, glomerulus. Previous studies showed that hyperactivation of the RhoGTPase, Rac1, in podocytes causes podocyte injury and glomerulosclerosis (accumulation of extracellular matrix in the glomerulus). However, the mechanism by which Rac1 is activated during podocyte injury is unknown. Trio is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) known to activate Rac1...
February 6, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Charles R Swanepoel, Mohamed G Atta, Vivette D D'Agati, Michelle M Estrella, Agnes B Fogo, Saraladevi Naicker, Frank A Post, Nicola Wearne, Cheryl A Winkler, Michael Cheung, David C Wheeler, Wolfgang C Winkelmayer, Christina M Wyatt
HIV-positive individuals are at increased risk for kidney disease, including HIV-associated nephropathy, noncollapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, immune-complex kidney disease, and comorbid kidney disease, as well as kidney injury resulting from prolonged exposure to antiretroviral therapy or from opportunistic infections. Clinical guidelines for kidney disease prevention and treatment in HIV-positive individuals are largely extrapolated from studies in the general population, and do not fully incorporate existing knowledge of the unique HIV-related pathways and genetic factors that contribute to the risk of kidney disease in this population...
February 2, 2018: Kidney International
John J Sim, Simran K Bhandari, Michael Batech, Aviv Hever, Teresa N Harrison, Yu-Hsiang Shu, Dean A Kujubu, Tracy Y Jonelis, Michael H Kanter, Steven J Jacobsen
OBJECTIVE: To compare renal function decline, incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and mortality among patients with 5 common glomerular diseases in a large diverse population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective cohort study (between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2011) of patients with glomerulonephropathy using the electronic health record of an integrated health system was performed. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) change, incident ESRD, and mortality were compared among patients with biopsy-proven focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), membranous glomerulonephritis (MN), minimal change disease (MCD), immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), and lupus nephritis (LN)...
January 9, 2018: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
James Goya Heaf, Alastair Hansen, Gunnar Hellmund Laier
BACKGROUND: The association of increased cancer risk with glomerulonephritis (GN) is well known, but controversy exists concerning which types of GN are involved, and the size of the association. A national registry survey was performed to assess the size of this association, and the temporal relationship of cancer diagnosis to GN diagnosis. METHODS: All patients with biopsy-proven GN between 1985 and 2015 in Denmark were extracted from The Danish Renal Biopsy Registry and the National Pathology Data Bank...
February 2, 2018: BMC Nephrology
Chunyue Feng, Qiong Wang, Jingjing Wang, Fei Liu, Huijun Shen, Haidong Fu, Jianhua Mao
RATIONALE: Mitochondrial nephropathy has a poor prognosis and often progresses to the end-stage renal disease. Renal pathology often is focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and does not respond to steroid therapy or immunosuppressive therapy. Some patients are benefited from the therapy of coenzyme Q10, which affect the synthesis pathway of coenzyme Q10. PATIENT CONCERNS: Herein, we report 2 cases of children with proteinuria renal disease with ADCK4 mutation...
November 2017: Medicine (Baltimore)
Catherine Courteau, Alex Al Khoury, Rene P Michel, Catherine L Weber
A 35-year-old man presented with severe hypo-osmolar hyponatremia (serum sodium 99 mmol/L), profound nonoliguric renal failure (serum creatinine 1240 μmol/L), and nephrotic range proteinuria. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed nephromegaly and no obstruction. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and conventional hemodialysis was initiated. To avoid rapid sodium correction, we prescribed concurrent dialysate flow, a low dialysate sodium concentration, a small surface area dialyzer, and a low blood flow rate...
January 30, 2018: Hemodialysis International
Di Feng, Jacob Notbohm, Ava Benjamin, Shijie He, Minxian Wang, Lay-Hong Ang, Minaspi Bantawa, Mehdi Bouzid, Emanuela Del Gado, Ramaswamy Krishnan, Martin R Pollak
α-Actinin-4 (ACTN4) bundles and cross-links actin filaments to confer mechanical resilience to the reconstituted actin network. How this resilience is built and dynamically regulated in the podocyte, and the cause of its failure in ACTN4 mutation-associated focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), remains poorly defined. Using primary podocytes isolated from wild-type (WT) and FSGS-causing point mutant Actn4 knockin mice, we report responses to periodic stretch. While WT cells largely maintained their F-actin cytoskeleton and contraction, mutant cells developed extensive and irrecoverable reductions in these same properties...
February 13, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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