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CAR therapy

L A Rojas, R Moreno, H Calderón, R Alemany
There is great skepticism in the capability of adenovirus vectors and oncolytic adenoviruses to reach specific organs or tumors upon systemic administration. Besides antibodies, the presence of CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus receptor) in human erythrocytes has been postulated to sequester CAR-binding adenoviruses, commonly used in gene therapy and oncolytic applications. The use of non-CAR-binding fibers or serotypes has been postulated to solve this limitation. Given the lack of integrins in erythrocytes and therefore of internalization of the CAR-bound virus, we hypothesized that the interaction of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) with CAR in human erythrocytes could be reversible...
October 21, 2016: Cancer Gene Therapy
Francesca Esposito, Ilaria Carli, Claudia Del Vecchio, Lijia Xu, Angela Corona, Nicole Grandi, Dario Piano, Elias Maccioni, Simona Distinto, Cristina Parolin, Enzo Tramontano
BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of effective antiretroviral therapies, drugs for HIV-1 treatment with new mode of action are still needed. An innovative approach is aimed to identify dual HIV-1 inhibitors, small molecules that can inhibit two viral functions at the same time. Rhubarb, originated from Rheum palmatum L. and Rheum officinale Baill., is one of the earliest and most commonly used medicinal plants in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practice. We wanted to explore TCM for the identification of new chemical scaffolds with dual action abilities against HIV-1...
November 15, 2016: Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology
Paulina J Paszkiewicz, Simon P Fräßle, Shivani Srivastava, Daniel Sommermeyer, Michael Hudecek, Ingo Drexler, Michel Sadelain, Lingfeng Liu, Michael C Jensen, Stanley R Riddell, Dirk H Busch
The adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is effective for treating human B cell malignancies. However, the persistence of functional CD19 CAR T cells causes sustained depletion of endogenous CD19+ B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to ablate transferred T cells after tumor eradication is complete to allow recovery of normal B cells. Previously, we developed a truncated version of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRt) that is coexpressed with the CAR on the T cell surface...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Linan Wang, Ning Ma, Sachiko Okamoto, Yasunori Amaishi, Eiichi Sato, Naohiro Seo, Junichi Mineno, Kazutoh Takesako, Takuma Kato, Hiroshi Shiku
Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen...
2016: Oncoimmunology
Ioanna Eleftheriadou, Ioannis Manolaras, Elaine E Irvine, Michael Dieringer, Antonio Trabalza, Nicholas D Mazarakis
OBJECTIVE: We have previously described the generation of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (α CAR)-targeted vector, and shown that intramuscular delivery in mouse leg muscles resulted in specific retrograde transduction of lumbar-motor neurons (MNs). Here, we utilized the α CAR-targeted vector to investigate the in vivo neuroprotective effects of lentivirally expressed IGF-1 for inducing neuronal survival and ameliorating the neuropathology and behavioral phenotypes of the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of ALS...
October 2016: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
Mark W Lowdell, Amy Thomas
Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) represent the current pinnacle of 'patient-specific medicines' and will change the nature of medicine in the near future. They fall into three categories; somatic cell-therapy products, gene therapy products and cells or tissues for regenerative medicine, which are termed 'tissue engineered' products. The term also incorporates 'combination products' where a human cell or tissue is combined with a medical device. Plainly, many of these new medicines share similarities with conventional haematological stem cell transplant products and donor lymphocyte infusions as well as solid organ grafts and yet ATMPs are regulated as medicines and their development has remained predominantly in academic settings and within specialist centres...
October 17, 2016: British Journal of Haematology
Shiv Kumar Sarin, Ashok Choudhury
Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a distinct entity that differs from acute liver failure and decompensated cirrhosis in timing, presence of treatable acute precipitant, and course of disease, with a potential for self-recovery. The core concept is acute deterioration of existing liver function in a patient of chronic liver disease with or without cirrhosis in response to an acute insult. The insult should be a hepatic one and presentation in the form of liver failure (jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy, ascites) with or without extrahepatic organ failure in a defined time frame...
December 2016: Current Gastroenterology Reports
Noelle V Frey, David L Porter
Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are engineered molecules that can be introduced into T cells to enable them to target specific tumor antigens. CAR T cells targeting CD19 have shown promise in patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell neoplasms, including those with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Notably, durable responses have been observed in patients who had not undergone consolidative stem cell transplant, a finding that correlates with reports of T-cell persistence and B-cell aplasia in studies of anti-CD19 treatment in vivo...
October 15, 2016: Oncology (Williston Park, NY)
Daniel H Li, James B Whitmore, Wentian Guo, Yuan Ji
Recent trials of adoptive cell therapy (ACT), such as the chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells therapy, have demonstrated promising therapeutic effects for cancer patients. A main issue in the product development is to decide appropriate dose of ACT. Traditional phase 1 trial designs for cytotoxic agents explicitly assume that toxicity increases monotonically with dose levels and implicitly assume the same for efficacy to justify dose escalation. ACT usually induces rapid responses, and the monotonic dose-response assumption is unlikely to hold due to its immunobiological activities...
October 14, 2016: Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Januario E Castro, Thomas J Kipps
Treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B cell malignancies is evolving very rapidly. We have observed the quick transition during the last couple of years, from chemo-immunotherapy based treatments to oral targeted therapies based on B cell receptor signaling and Bcl-2 inhibitors, as well as the increasing use of second generation glyco-engineered antibodies. The next wave of revolution in the treatment for this conditions is approaching and it will be based on strategies that harness the power of the immune system to fight cancer...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Preeti Sharma, David M Kranz
Adoptive T-cell therapies have shown exceptional promise in the treatment of cancer, especially B-cell malignancies. Two distinct strategies have been used to redirect the activity of ex vivo engineered T cells. In one case, the well-known ability of the T-cell receptor (TCR) to recognize a specific peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex molecule has been exploited by introducing a TCR against a cancer-associated peptide/human leukocyte antigen complex. In the other strategy, synthetic constructs called chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that contain antibody variable domains (single-chain fragments variable) and signaling domains have been introduced into T cells...
2016: F1000Research
Gregory J Patts, Debbie M Cheng, Nneka Emenyonu, Carly Bridden, Natalia Gnatienko, Christine A Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine Ngabirano, Tatiana Yaroslavtseva, Winnie R Muyindike, Sheri D Weiser, Evgeny M Krupitsky, Judith A Hahn, Jeffrey H Samet
Food insecurity (FI) is a documented problem associated with adverse health outcomes among HIV-infected populations. Little is known about the relationship between alcohol use and FI. We assessed whether heavy alcohol use was associated with FI among HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve cohorts in Uganda and Russia. Inverse probability of treatment weighted logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association using cross-sectional baseline data. FI was experienced by half of the Russia cohort (52 %) and by a large majority of the Uganda cohort (84 %)...
October 3, 2016: AIDS and Behavior
Michele Moschetta, Yawara Kawano, Klaus Podar
Unprecedented advances in multiple myeloma (MM) therapy during the last 15 years are predominantly based on our increasing understanding of the pathophysiologic role of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Indeed, new treatment paradigms, which incorporate thalidomide, immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), and proteasome inhibitors, target the tumor cell as well as its BM microenvironment. Ongoing translational research aims to understand in more detail how disordered BM-niche functions contribute to MM pathogenesis and to identify additional derived targeting agents...
2016: Cancer Treatment and Research
Nikolaos Papadantonakis, Anjali S Advani
This is an exciting time in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) given the advances in the relapsed/refractory setting. The development of antibody treatments (including antibody drug conjugates with toxins) offers a different treatment approach compared with conventional chemotherapy regimens. Moreover, the use of bispecific T-cell-engager antibodies (BiTEs) such as blinatumomab harness the cytotoxic activity of T cells against CD19-positive lymphoblasts. Another strategy involves the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells...
October 2016: Therapeutic Advances in Hematology
De Gui Wang, Mei-Jun Zhao, Yong-Qiang Liu, Xiang-Wen Liu, Hai-Tao Niu, Yan-Feng Song, Ying-Xia Tian
Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a promising strategy for bladder cancer treatment. However, the loss of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in bladder cancer cells decreases the infection efficiency of the therapeutic adenovirus. In this study, we constructed an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified adenovirus, RGDAd-UPII-TK, that carries a suicide gene called HSV-TK that is driven by a human UPII promoter. Then, we tested the bladder cancer specificity of the UPII promotor and the expression of the HSV-TK protein...
September 28, 2016: Oncotarget
M A Cortez, A B Korngold, D R Valdecanas, H G Caruso, S Niknam, L Cooper, J W Welsh
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Jelena Barbaric, Rachel Abbott, Pawel Posadzki, Mate Car, Laura H Gunn, Alison M Layton, Azeem Majeed, Josip Car
BACKGROUND: Acne vulgaris is a very common skin problem that presents with blackheads, whiteheads, and inflamed spots. It frequently results in physical scarring and may cause psychological distress. The use of oral and topical treatments can be limited in some people due to ineffectiveness, inconvenience, poor tolerability or side-effects. Some studies have suggested promising results for light therapies. OBJECTIVES: To explore the effects of light treatment of different wavelengths for acne...
September 27, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Nafees N Malik, Matthew B Durdy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 17, 2016: Drug Discovery Today
Nafees N Malik, Matthew B Durdy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Drug Discovery Today
Challice L Bonifant, Hollie J Jackson, Renier J Brentjens, Kevin J Curran
T cells can be genetically modified to target tumors through the expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Most notably, CAR T cells have demonstrated clinical efficacy in hematologic malignancies with more modest responses when targeting solid tumors. However, CAR T cells also have the capacity to elicit expected and unexpected toxicities including: cytokine release syndrome, neurologic toxicity, "on target/off tumor" recognition, and anaphylaxis. Theoretical toxicities including clonal expansion secondary to insertional oncogenesis, graft versus host disease, and off-target antigen recognition have not been clinically evident...
2016: Molecular Therapy Oncolytics
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