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Subarachnoid haemorrhage

J M Dyke, D M Moss, V A Fabian
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2016: Pathology
Hasan Turan, Atay Vural, Ozden Caliskan Kamisli, Nedim Tokgozoglu, Veysel Sal, Ilker Kahramanoglu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 19, 2016: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: the Journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Christian Vonderbrelie, Michael Seifert, Sergej Rot, Anja Tittel, Carsten Sanft, Ullrich Meier, Johannes Lemcke
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 11, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Ravi Uniyal, Neeraj Kumar, Hardeep Singh Malhotra, Ravindra Kumar Garg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 5, 2016: Acta Neurologica Belgica
Sannepaneni Kranthi, Barada P Sahu, Purohit Aniruddh
CONTEXT: Poor grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is usually associated with unfavorable outcomes and optimal management is deemed complicated. Most centres follow an expectant management strategy or a less aggressive approach till patients improve to good clinical grades. This approach has been associated with higher mortality and morbidity. However, not all patients with poor clinical condition fare badly. Identification and early aggressive management of this select group of patients may lead to favorable outcomes...
October 2016: Asian Journal of Neurosurgery
Renato Gondar, Oliver Pascal Gautschi, Johanna Cuony, Fabienne Perren, Max Jägersberg, Marco-Vincenzo Corniola, Bawarjan Schatlo, Granit Molliqaj, Sandrine Morel, Zsolt Kulcsár, Vitor Mendes Pereira, Daniel Rüfenacht, Karl Schaller, Philippe Bijlenga
BACKGROUND: The management of small unruptured incidentally discovered intracranial aneurysms (SUIAs) is still controversial. The aim of this study is to assess the safety of a management protocol of SUIAs, where selected cases with SUIAs are observed and secured only if signs of instability (growth) are documented. METHODS: A prospective consecutive cohort of 292 patients (2006-2014) and 368 SUIAs (anterior circulation aneurysms (ACs) smaller than 7 mm and posterior circulation aneurysms smaller than 4 mm without previous subarachnoid haemorrhage) was observed (mean follow-up time of 3...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
A Tölli, J Borg, B-M Bellander, F Johansson, C Höybye
PURPOSE: Reports on long-term variations in pituitary function after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) diverge. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the prevalence and changes in pituitary function during the first year after moderate and severe TBI and SAH and to explore the relation between pituitary function and injury variables. METHODS: Adults with moderate and severe TBI or SAH were evaluated at 10 days, 3, 6 and 12 months post-injury/illness...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation
J Hoogmoed, R van den Berg, B A Coert, G J E Rinkel, W P Vandertop, D Verbaan
BACKGROUND: In patients with poor clinical condition after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH), treatment is often deferred until patients show signs of improvement. Early external ventricular drainage and aneurysm occlusion may improve prognosis also in poor grade patients. The clinical outcome of an expeditious approach was compared with that of a conservative approach. METHODS: In all, 285 consecutive World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grade V aSAH patients admitted to three university hospitals between January 2000 and June 2007 were included...
September 26, 2016: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
R Skowronek, M Kobek, Z Jankowski, E Zielińska-Pająk, A Pałasz, J Pilch-Kowalczyk, R Kwarta, K Rygol, M Szczepański, C Chowaniec
Traumatic basal subarachnoid haemorrhage (TBSAH) represents only 1.8% of all subarachnoid haemorrhage cases diagnosed during autopsy. This report presents such a case from the current practice of the authors. Sixteen-year-old boy was beaten by the aggressors. Suddenly he lost his consciousness and fall after he received a single blow in the neck. He was resuscitated immediately, but died at the scene. During the external examination we did not find any significant external injuries. Autopsy revealed large contusion of right sternocleidomastoid muscle...
2016: Archiwum Medycyny Sa̧dowej i Kryminologii
Maryam Khan, Marco L A Sivilotti, Michael J Bullard, Marcel Émond, Jane Sutherland, Andrew Worster, Corinne M Hohl, Jacques S Lee, Mary Eisenhauer, Merril Pauls, Howard Lesiuk, George A Wells, Ian G Stiell, Jeffrey J Perry
BACKGROUND: CT has excellent sensitivity for subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) when performed within 6 hours of headache onset, but it is unknown to what extent patients with more severe disease are likely to undergo earlier CT, potentially inflating estimates of sensitivity. Our objective was to evaluate which patient and hospital factors were associated with earlier neuroimaging in alert, neurologically intact ED patients with suspected SAH. METHODS: We analysed data from two large sequential prospective cohorts of ED patients with acute headache undergoing CT for suspected SAH...
September 22, 2016: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
Robert Nash, V Elwell, S Brew, M Powell, J P Grieve
We describe two cases of clinical and radiographic vasospasm after transsphenoidal resection of a craniopharyngioma. We review the literature on the association of vasospasm and craniopharyngioma and examine management options. Given the lack of evidence for the optimal management of these patients, treatment in concordance with protocols for vasospasm due to subarachnoid haemorrhage is recommended.
November 2016: Acta Neurochirurgica
R Loch Macdonald, Tom A Schweizer
Subarachnoid haemorrhage is an uncommon and severe subtype of stroke affecting patients at a mean age of 55 years, leading to loss of many years of productive life. The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is the underlining cause in 85% of cases. Survival from aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage has increased by 17% in the past few decades, probably because of better diagnosis, early aneurysm repair, prescription of nimodipine, and advanced intensive care support. Nevertheless, survivors commonly have cognitive impairments, which in turn affect patients' daily functionality, working capacity, and quality of life...
September 13, 2016: Lancet
J Lansley, C Selai, A S Krishnan, K Lobotesis, H R Jäger
OBJECTIVES: To establish if emergency medicine and neuroscience specialist consultants have different risk tolerances for investigation of suspected spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and to establish if their risk-benefit appraisals concur with current guidelines. SETTING: 4 major neuroscience centres in London. PARTICIPANTS: 58 consultants in emergency medicine and neuroscience specialities (neurology, neurosurgery and neuroradiology) participated in an anonymous survey...
September 15, 2016: BMJ Open
Veer Bahadur Singh, Harish Kumar, Babu Lal Meena, Subhash Chandra, Jatin Agrawal, Naresh Kanogiya
INTRODUCTION: Malaria is the most important parasitic disease of humans causes clinical illness over 300-500 million people globally and over one million death every year globally. The involvement of the nervous system in malaria is studied in this paper, to help formulate a strategy for better malaria management. AIM: To study the Neuropsychiatric manifestation in malaria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective observational study in 170 patients with a clinical diagnosis of malaria admitted in various medical wards of medicine department of PBM Hospital, Bikaner during epidemic of malaria...
July 2016: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
Asma Bashir, Preben Sørensen
BACKGROUND: We have previously suggested that surgical gloves could be a possible means for transferring microorganisms from skin flora to shunt material during surgery. The objectives of this study were to examine (1) whether the rate of shunt infections was reduced after introducing intraoperative glove change before handling the shunt material; (2) clinical presentation of shunt infections, microbiological data, and treatment management; and (3) predictors of shunt infections. METHODS: A retrospective study of 432 shunt operations in 295 adults was undertaken over a 7-year period...
September 14, 2016: British Journal of Neurosurgery
Anoop Dinesh Shah, Spiros Denaxas, Owen Nicholas, Aroon D Hingorani, Harry Hemingway
BACKGROUND: Eosinophil and lymphocyte counts are commonly performed in clinical practice. Previous studies provide conflicting evidence of association with cardiovascular diseases. METHODS: We used linked primary care, hospitalisation, disease registry and mortality data in England (the CALIBER (CArdiovascular disease research using LInked Bespoke studies and Electronic health Records) programme). We included people aged 30 or older without cardiovascular disease at baseline, and used Cox models to estimate cause-specific HRs for the association of eosinophil or lymphocyte counts with the first occurrence of cardiovascular disease...
2016: Open Heart
F Wang, Q Guan, P Zang, X Liu, T Yang, H Song
Objective: The aim of this study was to report a case that underwent a craniotomy after primary pre-operative cerebrovascular and 3D digital subtract angiography (DSA) showed wrong outcomes. Digital subtract angiography misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis of aneurysms were found and the subject was subsequently treated correspondingly. This case was analysed to identify 1) the cause of the false positive and false negative results in DSA, 2) the limitations of 3D DSA and 3) the experience and lessons learned...
March 30, 2016: West Indian Medical Journal
Akio Kimura, Kentaro Kobayashi, Hitoshi Yamaguchi, Takeshi Takahashi, Masahiro Harada, Hideki Honda, Yoshio Mori, Keika Hirose, Noriko Tanaka
OBJECTIVE: To ensure good outcomes in the management of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), accurate prediction is crucial for initial assessment of patients presenting with acute headache. We conducted this study to develop a new clinical decision rule using only objectively measurable predictors to exclude SAH, offering higher specificity than the previous Ottawa SAH Rule while maintaining comparable sensitivity. DESIGN: Multicentre prospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary-care emergency departments of five general hospitals in Japan from April 2011 to March 2014...
2016: BMJ Open
Anastasia Tsyben, Iddo Paldor, John Laidlaw
Although common after subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and delayed ischaemic neurological deficit (DIND) rarely occur following elective clipping of unruptured aneurysms. The onset of this complication is variable and its pathophysiology is poorly understood. We report two patients with CVS associated with DIND following unruptured aneurysmal clipping. The literature is reviewed and the potential mechanisms in the context of patient presentations are discussed. A woman aged 53 and a man aged 70 were treated with elective clipping of unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms, the older patient also having an anterior communicating artery aneurysm clipped...
September 2, 2016: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Wouter J Harmsen, Gerard M Ribbers, Bart Zegers, Emiel M Sneekes, Majanka H Heijenbrok-Kal, Ladbon Khajeh, Fop van Kooten, Sebastiaan J C M M Neggers, Rita J G van den Berg-Emons
OBJECTIVE: To assess cardiorespiratory fitness in patients following an aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and to explore this in fatigued and non-fatigued patients. DESIGN: Cross-sectional case-control study. SUBJECTS/PATIENTS: A total of 28 patients, 6 months post aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, and 28 sex- and age-matched controls. METHODS: Cardiorespiratory responses to a progressive cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycle ergometer were obtained using indirect calorimetry...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
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