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Heat related illness

Devesh Vashishtha, William Sieber, Brittany Hailey, Kristen Guirguis, Alexander Gershunov, Wael K Al-Delaimy
Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine whether heat waves are associated with increased frequency of clinic visits for ICD-9 codes of illnesses traditionally associated with heat waves. Methods: During 4 years of family medicine clinic data between 2012 and 2016, we identified six heat wave events in San Diego County. For each heat wave event, we selected a control period in the same season that was twice as long. Scheduling a visit on a heat wave day (versus a non-heat wave day) was the primary predictor, and receiving a primary ICD-9 disease code related to heat waves was the outcome...
March 10, 2018: Family Practice
Sutapa Mukhopadhyay, Annie Hirsch, Suze Etienne, Natalia Melnikova, Jennifer Wu, Kanta Sircar, Maureen Orr
BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide (CO) is an insidious gas responsible for approximately 21,000 emergency department visits, 2300 hospitalizations, and 500 deaths in the United States annually. We analyzed 10 combined years of data from two Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry acute hazardous substance release surveillance programs to evaluate CO incident-related injuries. METHODS: Seventeen states participated in these programs during 2005-2014. RESULTS: In those 10years, the states identified 1795 CO incidents...
February 13, 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Alana Hansen, Dino Pisaniello, Blesson Varghese, Shelley Rowett, Scott Hanson-Easey, Peng Bi, Monika Nitschke
Heat exposure can be a health hazard for many Australian workers in both outdoor and indoor situations. With many heat-related incidents left unreported, it is often difficult to determine the underlying causal factors. This study aims to provide insights into perceptions of potentially unsafe or uncomfortably hot working conditions that can affect occupational health and safety using information provided by the public and workers to the safety regulator in South Australia (SafeWork SA). Details of complaints regarding heat exposure to the regulator's "Help Centre" were assembled in a dataset and the textual data analysed thematically...
March 6, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Yukie Ito, Manabu Akahane, Tomoaki Imamura
Background: In Japan, the demand for emergency transportation for people with heat-related illness has recently increased. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between incidents of heat-related illness and the daily maximum temperature. Methods: The daily maximum temperatures in Japan's 11 districts over the past 10 years were classified into four categories, with cutoff points at the 50th , 75th , 95th , and higher than 95th percentiles...
March 5, 2018: Chinese Medical Journal
Kazuya Kotani, Kayo Ueda, Xerxes Seposo, Shusuke Yasukochi, Hiroko Matsumoto, Masaji Ono, Akiko Honda, Hirohisa Takano
BACKGROUND: The elderly population has been the primary target of intervention to prevent heat-related illnesses. According to the literature, the highest risks have been observed among the elderly in the temperature-mortality relationship. However, findings regarding the temperature-morbidity relationship are inconsistent. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to examine the association of temperature with ambulance dispatches due to acute illnesses, stratified by age group...
2018: Global Health Action
Stephanie Hopp, Francesca Dominici, Jennifer F Bobb
Heat waves have been associated with adverse human health effects, including higher rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and these health effects may be exacerbated under continued climate change. However, specific causes of hospitalizations associated with heat waves have not been characterized on a national scale. We systematically estimated the risks of cause-specific hospitalizations during heat waves in a national cohort of 23.7 million Medicare enrollees residing in 1943 U.S. counties during 1999-2010...
February 8, 2018: Preventive Medicine
Darrell E Singer, Celia Byrne, Ligong Chen, Stephanie Shao, Jonathan Goldsmith, David W Niebuhr
Introduction: A number of studies have found an association between sickle cell trait (SCT) and exertional heat illnesses (EHIs) including heat stroke, a potentially fatal condition. The strength of this association varied across studies, limiting the ability to quantify potential benefits of SCT-screening policies for competitive athletics and military service members. We determined the relative rate and attributable risk of developing EHI associated with being SCT positive and the EHI health care utilization...
February 5, 2018: Military Medicine
Noreen Abbas Sherazi, Mirza Zain Baig, Aysha Habib Khan
OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of Macroprolactin (MaPRL) in patients with increased total prolactin and its clinical and financial impact. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Section of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from March to May 2015. METHODOLOGY: Patients with high total prolactin were screened by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation for determination of MaPRL...
February 2018: Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons—Pakistan: JCPSP
Payel Acharya, Bethany Boggess, Kai Zhang
Construction workers are at an elevated risk of heat stress, due to the strenuous nature of the work, high temperature work condition, and a changing climate. An increasing number of workers are at risk, as the industry's growth has been fueled by high demand and vast numbers of immigrant workers entering into the U.S., the Middle East and Asia to meet the demand. The risk of heat-related illnesses is increased by the fact that little to no regulations are present and/or enforced to protect these workers. This review recognizes the issues by summarizing epidemiological studies both in the U...
February 1, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Kristina Dietert, Geraldine Nouailles, Birgitt Gutbier, Katrin Reppe, Sarah Berger, Xiaohui Jiang, Anja E Schauer, Andreas C Hocke, Susanne Herold, Hortense Slevogt, Martin Witzenrath, Norbert Suttorp, Achim D Gruber
Descriptive histopathology of mouse models of pneumonia is essential in assessing the outcome of infections, molecular manipulations or therapies in the context of whole lungs. Quantitative comparisons between experimental groups, however, have been limited to laborious stereology or ill-defined scoring systems that depend on the subjectivity of a more or less experienced observer. Here, we introduce self-learning digital image analyses that allow to transform optical information from whole mouse lung sections into statistically testable data...
January 23, 2018: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Sachiko Nakamura, Koji Wada, Naoki Yanagisawa, Derek R Smith
BACKGROUND: In 2020, Japan will host the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2020 (Tokyo 2020) which will involve a large population influx from various countries to Tokyo, the most populated city in Japan. We summarize the potential health risks for visitors to Tokyo 2020, related to communicable disease risks and other health threats, based on recent national and local surveillance reports. METHODS: We reviewed up-to-date surveillance reports published by the National Institute of Infectious Diseases and Tokyo Metropolitan Infectious Disease Surveillance Center...
February 2, 2018: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease
Andrew J Grundstein, Yuri Hosokawa, Douglas J Casa
CONTEXT:   Weather-based activity modification in athletics is an important way to minimize heat illnesses. However, many commonly used heat-safety guidelines include a uniform set of heat-stress thresholds that do not account for geographic differences in acclimatization. OBJECTIVE:   To determine if heat-related fatalities among American football players occurred on days with unusually stressful weather conditions based on the local climate and to assess the need for regional heat-safety guidelines...
January 2018: Journal of Athletic Training
Jesse E Bell, Claudia Langford Brown, Kathryn Conlon, Stephanie Herring, Kenneth E Kunkel, Jay Lawrimore, George Luber, Carl Schreck, Adam Smith, Christopher Uejio
Extreme weather and climate-related events affect human health by causing death, injury, and illness, as well as having large socioeconomic impacts. Climate change has caused changes in extreme event frequency, intensity and geographic distribution, and will continue to be a driver for change in the future. Some of these events include heat waves, droughts, wildfires, dust storms, flooding rains, coastal flooding, storm surge, and hurricanes. The pathways connecting extreme events to health outcomes and economic losses can be diverse and complex...
November 29, 2017: Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association
Matteo Riccò
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between high air temperatures and occupational injuries (OIs) occurred during the summer seasons 2000-2013 in agricultural workers from the Autonomous Province of Trento (APT), North-Eastern Italy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data about OIs for the APT from 2000 to 2013 occurring during the warm season (N = 7325) was provided by the National Institute of Insurance for Occupational Illness and Injury. Daily average and daily maximum temperatures values for the specific geographical site of events were retrieved...
November 20, 2017: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health
Jo Corbett, Danny K White, Martin J Barwood, Christopher R D Wagstaff, Michael J Tipton, Terry McMorris, Joseph T Costello
BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that pacing is a thermoregulatory behaviour. We investigated the effect of competition on pacing, performance and thermophysiological strain during exercise in the heat and the psychological factors mediating competition effects. METHOD: Eighteen males (maximum oxygen uptake [V O 2max] 3.69 [0.44] L min(-1)) undertook a preliminary 20-km cool (wet-bulb globe temperature [WBGT] 12 °C) cycling time trial (TT) and three experimental 20-km trials (balanced order): (i) cool TT (CoolSolo); (ii) hot (WBGT 26 °C) TT (HotSolo); (iii) hot head-to-head competition (HotH2H)...
November 17, 2017: Sports Medicine
June T Spector, Jennifer Krenz, Miriam Calkins, Dawn Ryan, Jose Carmona, Mengjie Pan, Anna Zemke, Paul D Sampson
BACKGROUND: We sought to evaluate potential mediators of the relationship between heat exposure and traumatic injuries in outdoor agricultural workers. METHODS: Linear mixed models were used to estimate associations between maximum work-shift Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGTmax) and post-shift vigilance (reaction time) and postural sway (total path length) in a cross-sectional sample of 46 Washington State tree fruit harvesters in August-September 2015. RESULTS: The mean (SD) WBGTmax was 27...
February 2018: Applied Ergonomics
Nicole Beck, Jo Anne G Balanay, Terri Johnson
Groundskeepers spend most of the year working outdoors, exposing them to heat and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and increasing their risk to related adverse health effects. Various studies on heat and UV exposures in different occupations have been published, but those on groundskeepers are rare. The purpose of this study was to assess the exposure to heat stress and solar UV radiation among groundskeepers in an eastern North Carolina university setting. Wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index using a heat stress monitor and UV effective irradiance (UVeff) index using a digital UV meter were recorded in various work areas 3 times a day (morning, noon, afternoon) and during 3 seasons (spring, summer, fall)...
November 1, 2017: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
Michael John Stacey, Simon K Delves, Sophie E Britland, Adrian J Allsopp, Stephen J Brett, Joanne L Fallowfield, David R Woods
PURPOSE: To prevent heat-related illnesses, guidelines recommend limiting core body temperature (T c) ≤ 38 °C during thermal stress. Copeptin, a surrogate for arginine vasopressin secretion, could provide useful information about fluid balance, thermal strain and health risks. It was hypothesised that plasma copeptin would rise with dehydration from occupational heat stress, concurrent with sympathoadrenal activation and reduced glomerular filtration, and that these changes would reflect T c responses...
October 27, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
Albert P C Chan, Ying Zhang, Faming Wang, Francis F K Wong, Daniel W M Chan
A novel hybrid cooling vest (HCV) incorporated with phase change materials (PCMs) and ventilation fans has been developed for construction workers in Hong Kong to attenuate heat stress and prevent heat-related illnesses, and its effectiveness and practicality have been validated in this study. A total of 140 wear trials involving of 140 workers were conducted in Hong Kong construction sites during the summer time. Each wear trial involves a two-day wear test, of which one day workers wore the HCV (denoted as VEST) during resting, and another day they wore traditional workwear (denoted as CON)...
December 2017: Journal of Thermal Biology
Daniel J Bolus, Gobinath Shanmugam, Madhusudhanan Narasimhan, Namakkal S Rajasekaran
Heat-related illness and injury are becoming a growing safety concern for the farmers, construction workers, miners, firefighters, manufacturing workers, and other outdoor workforces who are exposed to heat stress in their routine lives. A primary response by a cell to an acute heat shock (HS) exposure is the induction of heat-shock proteins (HSPs), which chaperone and facilitate cellular protein folding and remodeling processes. While acute HS is well studied, the effect of repeated bouts of hyperthermia and the sustained production of HSPs in the myoblast-myotube model system of C2C12 cells are poorly characterized...
October 24, 2017: Cell Stress & Chaperones
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