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Economic Model

Bin Wang, Qian Chen, Lixiao Shen, Shasha Zhao, Weiyi Pang, Jun Zhang
Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are commonly used in industrial applications and consumer products, and their potential health impacts are of concern, especially for vulnerable population like fetuses. However, in utero exposure to PFASs and health implications are far from fully characterized in China. To fill in the gap, we analyzed 10 PFASs in cord plasma samples (N=687) collected in Shanghai between 2011 and 2012, one of the regions widely polluted with PFASs in China. A questionnaire survey on maternal and diet-related factors was conducted...
October 19, 2016: Environment International
C Teljeur, P S Moran, S Walshe, S M Smith, F Cianci, L Murphy, P Harrington, M Ryan
AIMS: To systematically review the evidence on the costs and cost-effectiveness of self-management support interventions for people with diabetes. BACKGROUND: Self-management support is the provision of education and supportive interventions to increase patients' skills and confidence in managing their health problems, potentially leading to improvements in HbA1c levels in people with diabetes. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials, observational studies or economic modelling studies were eligible for inclusion in the review...
October 22, 2016: Diabetic Medicine: a Journal of the British Diabetic Association
Aideen Maguire, John Moriarty, Dermot O'Reilly, Mark McCann
PURPOSE: Educational attainment has been shown to be positively associated with mental health and a potential buffer to stressful events. One stressful life event likely to affect everyone in their lifetime is bereavement. This paper assesses the effect of educational attainment on mental health post-bereavement. METHODS: By utilising large administrative datasets, linking Census returns to death records and prescribed medication data, we analysed the bereavement exposure of 208,332 individuals aged 25-74 years...
October 21, 2016: Quality of Life Research
Ricardo Pagan
BACKGROUND: Although sleep is considered an essential part of individuals' lives, there are no previous studies analysing how sleep duration affects the levels of life satisfaction reported by males and females with disabilities. OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: To analyse and compare the impact of hours of sleep on life satisfaction scores reported by people without and with disabilities (stratified by sex) in Germany. METHODS: Using data taken from the German Socio-Economic Panel for the period 2008-2013, we estimate life satisfaction equations for males and females (running a fixed-effects model) which include a set of variables measuring the number of sleep hours on workdays and weekends...
October 11, 2016: Disability and Health Journal
Zahra Afghah, Brett Webb, Xiang-Jin Meng, Sheela Ramamoorthy
More than two decades after its emergence, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) remains an economically important swine pathogen. Commercial vaccines which were first introduced to the U.S in 2006, have been highly effective in reducing clinical signs and improving production. Recent studies have indicated a declining level of PCV2 prevalence and viremia in the field. However, reports on the emergence of new viral variants have also continued to increase. This article reviews topics of current interest in the field of PCV2 vaccines; including the comparative efficacy of the available commercial products, efficacy of current vaccines against new and emerging strains, findings on the differences between immunity in natural infection versus vaccination, limitations of current experimental models for PCV2 vaccine studies, and new developments in novel experimental vaccines...
October 13, 2016: Veterinary Microbiology
Philip Tack, Jan Victor, Paul Gemmel, Lieven Annemans
BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional (3D) printing has numerous applications and has gained much interest in the medical world. The constantly improving quality of 3D-printing applications has contributed to their increased use on patients. This paper summarizes the literature on surgical 3D-printing applications used on patients, with a focus on reported clinical and economic outcomes. METHODS: Three major literature databases were screened for case series (more than three cases described in the same study) and trials of surgical applications of 3D printing in humans...
October 21, 2016: Biomedical Engineering Online
Edward Johnston, Hayley Pye, Elisenda Bonet-Carne, Eleftheria Panagiotaki, Dominic Patel, Myria Galazi, Susan Heavey, Lina Carmona, Alexander Freeman, Giorgia Trevisan, Clare Allen, Alexander Kirkham, Keith Burling, Nicola Stevens, David Hawkes, Mark Emberton, Caroline Moore, Hashim U Ahmed, David Atkinson, Manuel Rodriguez-Justo, Tony Ng, Daniel Alexander, Hayley Whitaker, Shonit Punwani
BACKGROUND: Whilst multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has been a significant advance in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, scanning all patients with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels is considered too costly for widespread National Health Service (NHS) use, as the predictive value of PSA levels for significant disease is poor. Despite the fact that novel blood and urine tests are available which may predict aggressive disease better than PSA, they are not routinely employed due to a lack of clinical validity studies...
October 21, 2016: BMC Cancer
Katsiaryna Holl, Christophe Sauboin, Emanuele Amodio, Paolo Bonanni, Giovanni Gabutti
BACKGROUND: Varicella is a highly infectious disease with a significant public health and economic burden, which can be prevented with childhood routine varicella vaccination. Vaccination strategies differ by country. Some factors are known to play an important role (number of doses, coverage, dosing interval, efficacy and catch-up programmes), however, their relative impact on the reduction of varicella in the population remains unclear. This paper aims to help policy makers prioritise the critical factors to achieve the most successful vaccination programme with the available budget...
October 21, 2016: BMC Public Health
Luisanna Cocco, Michele Marchesi
In January 3, 2009, Satoshi Nakamoto gave rise to the "Bitcoin Blockchain", creating the first block of the chain hashing on his computer's central processing unit (CPU). Since then, the hash calculations to mine Bitcoin have been getting more and more complex, and consequently the mining hardware evolved to adapt to this increasing difficulty. Three generations of mining hardware have followed the CPU's generation. They are GPU's, FPGA's and ASIC's generations. This work presents an agent-based artificial market model of the Bitcoin mining process and of the Bitcoin transactions...
2016: PloS One
C Jason Wang, Skye H Cheng, Jen-You Wu, Yi-Ping Lin, Wen-Hsin Kao, Chia-Li Lin, Yin-Jou Chen, Shu-Ling Tsai, Feng-Yu Kao, Andrew T Huang
Importance: Value-driven payment system reform is a potential tool for aligning economic incentives with the improvement of quality and efficiency of health care and containment of cost. Such a payment system has not been researched satisfactorily in full-cycle cancer care. Objective: To examine the association of outcomes and medical expenditures with a bundled-payment pay-for-performance program for breast cancer in Taiwan compared with a fee-for-service (FFS) program...
October 20, 2016: JAMA Oncology
Dominic Woolf, Johannes Lehmann, David R Lee
Restricting global warming below 2 °C to avoid catastrophic climate change will require atmospheric carbon dioxide removal (CDR). Current integrated assessment models (IAMs) and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scenarios assume that CDR within the energy sector would be delivered using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). Although bioenergy-biochar systems (BEBCS) can also deliver CDR, they are not included in any IPCC scenario. Here we show that despite BECCS offering twice the carbon sequestration and bioenergy per unit biomass, BEBCS may allow earlier deployment of CDR at lower carbon prices when long-term improvements in soil fertility offset biochar production costs...
October 21, 2016: Nature Communications
Eeva-Liisa Paattiniemi, Santra Karumaa, Anna-Mari Viita, Pauliina Kärpänoja, Marjukka Mäkelä, Jaana Isojärvi, Hannu Sarkkinen
Urine culture samples comprise a large proportion of the workload in clinical microbiology laboratories, and most of the urine samples show no growth or insignificant growth. A flow cytometry-based analyzer (Sysmex Corporation, Japan) has been used to screen out negative urine samples prior to culture in the Päijät-Häme district. We applied decision analytic modelling to analyze, from a laboratory perspective, the economic feasibility of the screening method as compared to culture only (conventional method) for diagnosis of urinary tract infection...
October 21, 2016: Infectious Diseases
Josep L Conde-Sala, Cristina Portellano-Ortiz, Laia Calvó-Perxas, Josep Garre-Olmo
PURPOSE: To analyse the clinical, sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors that influence perceived quality of life (QoL) in a community sample of 33,241 people aged 65+ and to examine the relationship with models of social welfare in Europe. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of data from Wave 5 (2013) of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). The instruments used in the present study were as follows: sociodemographic data, CASP-12 (QoL), EURO-D (depression), indicators of life expectancy and suicide (WHO), and economic indicators (World Bank)...
October 20, 2016: Quality of Life Research
Aparna Lal, Timothy Dobbins, Nasser Bagheri, Michael G Baker, Nigel P French, Simon Hales
The public health risks associated with dairy farming intensification are an emerging concern. We examine the association between dairy cattle density and cryptosporidiosis risk in children <5 years old in New Zealand from 1997 to 2008, a period of rapid intensification of the dairy industry. Multi-level Poisson regression was used to model reported cryptosporidiosis (N = 3869 cases) incidence in relation to dairy cattle densities across urban and rural areas separately, after controlling for microbiological quality of public drinking water supplies and neighbourhood socio-economic factors using the Census Area Unit of residence...
October 20, 2016: EcoHealth
Rafael Vilhena de Carvalho Fürst, Afonso César Polimanti, Sidnei José Galego, Maria Claudia Bicudo, Erik Montagna, João Antônio Corrêa
OBJECTIVE: To present a simple and affordable model able to properly simulate an ultrasound-guided venous access. DESIGN: The simulation was made using a latex balloon tube filled with water and dye solution implanted in a thawed chicken breast with bones. RESULTS: The presented model allows the simulation of all implant stages of a central catheter. The obtained echogenicity is similar to that observed in human tissue, and the ultrasound identification of the tissues, balloon, needle, wire guide and catheter is feasible and reproducible...
October 20, 2016: World Journal of Surgery
Suxu Tan, Jun Yao, Tao Zhou, Shikai Liu, Zihao Yuan, Changxu Tian, Qi Li, Zhanjiang Liu
The Rho family GTPases are a group of small monomeric G proteins, which are molecular switches in signaling pathways. They have been known to regulate a diverse range of cellular processes including actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and microtubule dynamics. In particular, their participations in immune responses are also significant. However, little information of the Rho GTPases is available in teleost including channel catfish, an economically important species and one of the best teleost models for immune research...
October 17, 2016: Developmental and Comparative Immunology
Teresa M Attina, Russ Hauser, Sheela Sathyanarayana, Patricia A Hunt, Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, John Peterson Myers, Joseph DiGangi, R Thomas Zoeller, Leonardo Trasande
BACKGROUND: Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) contribute to disease and dysfunction and incur high associated costs (>1% of the gross domestic product [GDP] in the European Union). Exposure to EDCs varies widely between the USA and Europe because of differences in regulations and, therefore, we aimed to quantify disease burdens and related economic costs to allow comparison. METHODS: We used existing models for assessing epidemiological and toxicological studies to reach consensus on probabilities of causation for 15 exposure-response relations between substances and disorders...
October 17, 2016: Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
Barbara Picone, Clint Rhode, Rouvay Roodt-Wilding
Aquatic animal diseases are one of the most important limitations to the growth of aquaculture. miRNAs represent an important class of small ncRNAs able to modulate host immune and stress responses. In Mollusca, a large phylum of invertebrates, miRNAs have been identified in several species. The current preliminary study identified known miRNAs from the South African abalone, Haliotis midae. The economic and ecological importance of abalone makes this species a suitable model for studying and understanding stress response in marine gastropods...
October 17, 2016: Marine Genomics
Johanneke D Hemmink, Sophie B Morgan, Mario Aramouni, Helen Everett, Francisco J Salguero, Laetitia Canini, Emily Porter, Margo Chase-Topping, Katy Beck, Ronan Mac Loughlin, B Veronica Carr, Ian H Brown, Mick Bailey, Mark Woolhouse, Sharon M Brookes, Bryan Charleston, Elma Tchilian
Influenza virus infection in pigs is a major farming problem, causing considerable economic loss and posing a zoonotic threat. In addition the pig is an excellent model for understanding immunity to influenza viruses as this is a natural host pathogen system. Experimentally, influenza virus is delivered to pigs intra-nasally, by intra-tracheal instillation or by aerosol, but there is little data comparing the outcome of different methods. We evaluated the shedding pattern, cytokine responses in nasal swabs and immune responses following delivery of low or high dose swine influenza pdmH1N1 virus to the respiratory tract of pigs intra-nasally or by aerosol and compared them to those induced in naturally infected contact pigs...
October 20, 2016: Veterinary Research
Kristian Heggebø
OBJECTIVE: Previous research has established that both ill health and minority status are associated with unemployment. Less is known, however, about the interplay between having ill health and being from minority background. The present study examines whether immigrants and descendants with ill health are particularly prone to unemployment during an economic downturn in Europe. DESIGN: The European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) cross-sectional data material is utilized, and linear probability models are estimated...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
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