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Slow wave sleep

Anastasia Greenberg, Javad Karimi Abadchi, Clayton T Dickson, Majid H Mohajerani
The signature rhythm of slow-wave forebrain activity is the large amplitude, slow oscillation (SO: ∼1 Hz) made up of alternating synchronous periods of activity and silence at the single cell and network levels. On each wave, the SO originates at a unique location and propagates across the neocortex. Attempts to manipulate SO activity using electrical fields have been shown to entrain cortical networks and enhance memory performance. However, neural activity during this manipulation has remained elusive due to methodological issues in typical electrical recordings...
March 10, 2018: NeuroImage
Edward J Szczygiel, Sungeun Cho, Robin M Tucker
Little is known about the relationship between sleep and chemosensation. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relationship between chemosensory function and sleep duration, quality and architecture. A total of 56 non-obese (BMI<30 kg/m2) female participants who denied having diagnosed sleep disorders completed testing. Sleep was measured for two nights using a single-channel (A1-A2) electroencephalogram-(EEG) (Zmachine). Sweet taste threshold and preference as well as olfactory threshold, recognition ability, and pleasantness ratings were evaluated...
March 7, 2018: Chemical Senses
M Elizabeth Wilcox, Andrew S Lim, Ruxandra Pinto, Sandra E Black, Mary Pat McAndrews, Gordon D Rubenfeld
BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated sleep in patients after intensive care despite the possibility that inadequate sleep might further complicate an acute illness impeding recovery. AIMS: Our objectives were to assess the quality and quantity of a patients' sleep on the ward by polysomnography (PSG) within a week of intensive care unit (ICU) discharge and to explore the prevalence of key in-ICU risk factors for persistent sleep fragmentation. METHODS: We enrolled twenty patients after they have been mechanically ventilated for at least 3 days and survived to ICU discharge...
March 9, 2018: Internal Medicine Journal
Marie-Ève Desjardins, Andrée-Ann Baril, Jean-Paul Soucy, Thien Thanh Dang-Vu, Alex Desautels, Dominique Petit, Jacques Montplaisir, Antonio Zadra
Study objectives: The present study assessed brain perfusion patterns with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during sleepwalkers' post-sleep deprivation slow-wave sleep and resting-state wakefulness. Methods: Following a 24-hr period of sleep deprivation, 10 sleepwalkers and 10 sex- and age-matched controls were scanned with a high-resolution SPECT scanner. Participants were injected with99mTc-ECD after 2 minutes of stable slow-wave sleep within their first sleep cycle as well as during resting-state wakefulness, both after a subsequent 24-hr period of sleep deprivation...
March 3, 2018: Sleep
Jessica Page, Caroline Lustenberger, Flavio Fr Hlich
Widespread change in behavior and the underlying brain network substrate is a hallmark of early development. Sleep plays a fundamental role in this process. Both slow waves and spindles are key features of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) that exhibit pronounced developmental trajectories from infancy to adulthood. Yet, these prominent features of NREM sleep are poorly understood in infants and toddlers in the age range of 12 to 30 months. Moreover, it is unknown how network dynamics of NREM sleep are associated with outcomes of early development...
February 2, 2018: Sleep
Christine Lu, Eleanor Hutchens, Leon Farhy, Heather Bonner, Paul Suratt, Christopher McCartney
<br>Objective: During the early follicular phase, sleep-related luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse initiation is positively associated with brief awakenings but negatively associated with random eye movement (REM) sleep. The relationship between sleep architecture and LH pulse initiation has not been assessed in other cycle stages or in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). DESIGN AND METHODS: We performed concomitant frequent blood sampling (LH pulse analysis) and polysomnography in 8 normal women (cycle day 7-11) and 7 women with PCOS (at least cycle day 7)...
March 5, 2018: Neuroendocrinology
Ana González-Rueda, Victor Pedrosa, Rachael C Feord, Claudia Clopath, Ole Paulsen
Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity is critical for cortical circuit refinement. The synaptic homeostasis hypothesis suggests that synaptic connections are strengthened during wake and downscaled during sleep; however, it is not obvious how the same plasticity rules could explain both outcomes. Using whole-cell recordings and optogenetic stimulation of presynaptic input in urethane-anesthetized mice, which exhibit slow-wave-sleep (SWS)-like activity, we show that synaptic plasticity rules are gated by cortical dynamics in vivo...
February 12, 2018: Neuron
K Sakai
A total of 668 single units were recorded in the mouse periaqueductal gray (PAG) and adjacent deep mesencephalic nucleus (DpMe) in order to determine their role in the switching of sleep-wake states, i.e. wakefulness (W), slow-wave sleep (SWS), and paradoxical (or rapid eye movement) sleep (PS) in general, and, in particular, to determine whether PS-on and PS-off neurons involved in PS state switching are present in these structures and to identify neuronal substrates for the SWS-PS switching mediated by DpMe neurons...
March 2, 2018: European Journal of Neuroscience
Despina Afroditi Lalou, Marek Czosnyka, Joseph Donnelly, Andrea Lavinio, John D Pickard, Matthew Garnett, Zofia Czosnyka
OBJECTIVES: Slow waves of intracranial pressure (ICP) are spontaneous oscillations with a frequency of 0.3-4 cycles/min. They are often associated with pathological conditions, following vasomotor activity in the cranial enclosure. This study quantifies the effects of general anaesthesia (GA) on the magnitude of B-waves compared with natural sleep and the conscious state. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four groups of 30 patients each were formed to assess the magnitude of slow waves...
2018: Acta Neurochirurgica. Supplement
Damien Léger, Eden Debellemaniere, Arnaud Rabat, Virginie Bayon, Karim Benchenane, Mounir Chennaoui
In recent decades, increasing evidence has positioned slow-wave sleep (SWS) as a major actor in neurophysiological phenomena such as glucose metabolism, hormone release, immunity and memory. This proposed role for SWS, coupled with observations of impaired SWS in several pathologies as well as in aging, has led some researchers to implement methods that could specifically enhance SWS. This review aims to gather the current knowledge extending from the cell to the clinic, in order to construct an overview of what is currently known about so-called SWS...
February 5, 2018: Sleep Medicine Reviews
Pierre-Hervé Luppi, Patrice Fort
In the present chapter, hypotheses on the mechanisms responsible for the genesis of the three vigilance states, namely, waking, non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) also called slow-wave sleep (SWS), and REM sleep also called paradoxical sleep (PS), are presented. A huge number of studies first indicate that waking is induced by the activation of multiple waking systems, including the serotonergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic, and hypocretin systems. At the onset of sleep, the SWS-active neurons would be activated by the circadian clock localized in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and a hypnogenic factor, adenosine, which progressively accumulates in the brain during waking...
February 24, 2018: Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology
Maëva Ferraris, Antoine Ghestem, Ana F Vicente, Lauriane Nallet-Khosrofian, Christophe Bernard, Pascale P Quilichini
Gamma oscillations are involved in long-range coupling of distant regions which support various cognitive operations. Here we show in adult male rats that synchronized bursts of gamma oscillations bind the hippocampus (HPC) and prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during slow oscillations and slow wave sleep, a brain state that is central for consolidation of memory traces. These gamma bursts entrained the firing of the local HPC and mPFC neuronal populations. Neurons of the nucleus reuniens (NR), which is a structural and functional hub between HPC and mPFC, demonstrated a specific increase in their firing prior to gamma burst onset, suggesting their involvement in HPC-mPFC binding...
February 19, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Sébrina Aubin, Julie A E Christensen, Poul Jennum, Tore Nielsen, Ron Kupers, Maurice Ptito
The loss of vision, particularly when it occurs early in life, is associated with compensatory cortical plasticity not only in the visual cortical areas, but throughout the entire brain. The absence of visual input to the retina can also induce changes in entrainment of the circadian rhythm, as light is the primary zeitgeber of the master biological clock found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, a greater number of sleep disturbances is often reported in blind individuals. Here, we examined various electroencephalographic microstructural components of sleep, both during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep, between blind individuals, including both of early and late onset, and normal-sighted controls...
February 2018: Sleep Medicine
Dushyanth Babu Jasti, Sarat Mallipeddi, A Apparao, B Vengamma, Satyarao Kolli, A Mohan
Objective: The objective of this study is to study the quality of sleep, sleep disorders, and polysomnographic profile in Parkinsonism patients from rural areas and to correlate polysomnographic profile with the staging of disease and with sleep questionnaire. Materials and Methods: Between May 2014 and December 2015, 168 Parkinsonism patients were prospectively screened using sleep questionnaire; Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Parkinson Disease Sleep Score-2 (PDSS-2)...
January 2018: Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
Janna Mantua, Antigone Grillakis, Sanaa H Mahfouz, Maura R Taylor, Allison J Brager, Angela M Yarnell, Thomas J Balkin, Vincent F Capaldi, Guido Simonelli
Sleep quality appears to be altered by traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, whether persistent post-injury changes in sleep architecture are present is unknown and relatively unexplored. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the extent to which chronic TBI (>6 months since injury) is characterized by changes to sleep architecture. We also explored the relationship between sleep architecture and TBI severity. In the fourteen included studies, sleep was assessed with at least one night of polysomnography in both chronic TBI participants and controls...
February 2, 2018: Sleep Medicine Reviews
Dmitry Gerashchenko, Michelle A Schmidt, Mark R Zielinski, Michele E Moore, Jonathan P Wisor
Slow-wave activity (SWA) in the electroencephalogram during slow-wave sleep (SWS) varies as a function of sleep-wake history. A putative sleep-active population of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing interneurons in the cerebral cortex, defined as such by the expression of Fos in animals euthanized after protracted deep sleep, may be a local regulator of SWA. We investigated whether electrophysiological responses to activation of these cells are consistent with their role of a local regulator of SWA...
February 10, 2018: Neuroscience
Xiao Yu, Nicholas P Franks, William Wisden
Sedatives target just a handful of receptors and ion channels. But we have no satisfying explanation for how activating these receptors produces sedation. In particular, do sedatives act at restricted brain locations and circuitries or more widely? Two prominent sedative drugs in clinical use are zolpidem, a GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulator, and dexmedetomidine (DEX), a selective α2 adrenergic receptor agonist. By targeting hypothalamic neuromodulatory systems both drugs induce a sleep-like state, but in different ways: zolpidem primarily reduces the latency to NREM sleep, and is a controlled substance taken by many people to help them sleep; DEX produces prominent slow wave activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG) resembling stage 2 NREM sleep, but with complications of hypothermia and lowered blood pressure-it is used for long term sedation in hospital intensive care units-under DEX-induced sedation patients are arousable and responsive, and this drug reduces the risk of delirium...
2018: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
Armando D'Agostino, Anna Castelnovo, Simone Cavallotti, Cecilia Casetta, Matteo Marcatili, Orsola Gambini, Mariapaola Canevini, Giulio Tononi, Brady Riedner, Fabio Ferrarelli, Simone Sarasso
Sleep spindles and slow waves are the main brain oscillations occurring in non-REM sleep. Several lines of evidence suggest that spindles are initiated within the thalamus, whereas slow waves are generated and modulated in the cortex. A decrease in sleep spindle activity has been described in Schizophrenia (SCZ), including chronic, early course, and early onset patients. In contrast, slow waves have been inconsistently found to be reduced in SCZ, possibly due to confounds like duration of illness and antipsychotic medication exposure...
February 9, 2018: NPJ Schizophrenia
Martin Olsson, Johan Ärlig, Jan Hedner, Kaj Blennow, Henrik Zetterberg
Study Objective: To investigate the cumulative effect of 5 consecutive nights of partial sleep deprivation on a panel of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in healthy adults. Methods: A randomized, cross-over study conducted at the University of Gothenburg. The participants (N=13) were healthy adults (20-40 years of age) with a normal sleeping pattern. The participants underwent a baseline sleep period consisting of 5 nights with 8h spent in bed. A subsequent period with partial sleep deprivation (PSD) consisted of 5 nights of maximum 4h of sleep per night...
February 7, 2018: Sleep
Junxin Li, Michael V Vitiello, Nalaka S Gooneratne
Sleep patterns change with aging, independent of other factors, and include advanced sleep timing, shortened nocturnal sleep duration, increased frequency of daytime naps, increased number of nocturnal awakenings and time spent awake during the night, and decreased slow wave sleep. Most of these changes seem to occur between young and middle adulthood; sleep parameters remain largely unchanged among healthy older adults. The circadian system and sleep homeostatic mechanisms become less robust with normal aging...
March 2018: Sleep Medicine Clinics
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