Read by QxMD icon Read

Family witnessed resuscitation

Kristin M Schmid, Nee-Kofi Mould-Millman, Andrew Hammes, Miranda Kroehl, Raquel Quiros García, Manrique Umaña McDermott, Steven R Lowenstein
BACKGROUND: Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves survival after prehospital cardiac arrest. While community CPR training programs have been implemented across the US, little is known about their acceptability in non-US Latino populations. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to enrolling in CPR training classes and performing CPR in San José, Costa Rica. METHODS: After consulting 10 San José residents, a survey was created, pilot-tested, and distributed to a convenience sample of community members in public gathering places in San José...
October 2016: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
Guillaume Cariou, Thierry Pelaccia
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest occurs most often at home and often in the presence of family members of the patient who witness the event. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training of the next of kin of at-risk patients is thus potentially beneficial. The aim of our study was to document the prevalence of appropriate training among cardiac patients' cohabitants, as well as the motivations or obstacles to seeking training. 153 cohabitants of 127 patients who were hospitalized 1 year prior for confirmed coronary disease in a cardiology department (Paris, France) were interviewed using a structured questionnaire between October 2013 and March 2014...
June 27, 2016: Internal and Emergency Medicine
Carla De Stefano, Domitille Normand, Patricia Jabre, Elie Azoulay, Nancy Kentish-Barnes, Frederic Lapostolle, Thierry Baubet, Paul-Georges Reuter, Nicolas Javaud, Stephen W Borron, Eric Vicaut, Frederic Adnet
BACKGROUND: The themes of qualitative assessments that characterize the experience of family members offered the choice of observing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of a loved one have not been formally identified. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the context of a multicenter randomized clinical trial offering family members the choice of observing CPR of a patient with sudden cardiac arrest, a qualitative analysis, with a sequential explanatory design, was conducted...
2016: PloS One
Susie Cartledge, Janet E Bray, Marion Leary, Dion Stub, Judith Finn
AIM: Targeting basic life support (BLS) training to bystanders who are most likely to witness an out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an important public health intervention. We performed a systematic review examining the evidence of the effectiveness of providing BLS training to family members of high-risk cardiac patients. METHODS: A search of Ovid MEDLINE, CINAL, EMBASE, Informit, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Scopus, ERIC and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global was conducted...
August 2016: Resuscitation
Mary E Fallat, Anita P Barbee, Richard Forest, Mary E McClure, Katy Henry, Michael R Cunningham
OBJECTIVE: To understand effective ways for EMS providers to interact with distressed family members during a field intervention involving a recent or impending out-of-hospital (OOH) pediatric death. METHODS: Eight focus groups with 98 EMS providers were conducted in urban and rural settings between November 2013 and March 2014. Sixty-eight providers also completed a short questionnaire about a specific event including demographics. Seventy-eight percent of providers were males, 13% were either African American or Hispanic, and the average number of years in EMS was 16 years...
May 18, 2016: Prehospital Emergency Care
Akira Funada, Yoshikazu Goto, Tetsuo Maeda, Ryota Teramoto, Kenshi Hayashi, Masakazu Yamagishi
BACKGROUND: There is sparse data regarding the survival and neurological outcome of elderly patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS AND RESULTS: OHCA patients (334,730) aged ≥75 years were analyzed using a nationwide, prospective, population-based Japanese OHCA database from 2008 to 2012. The overall 1-month survival with favorable neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category Scale, category 1 or 2; CPC 1-2) rate was 0.88%. During the study period, the annual 1-month CPC 1-2 rate in whole OHCA significantly improved (0...
April 25, 2016: Circulation Journal: Official Journal of the Japanese Circulation Society
Erica Jordahl, Yolanda M Hyde, Donald D Kautz
Giving family members the option of being present during resuscitation has been shown to be beneficial for both family and staff. However, only a small percentage of intensive care units have policies promoting family-witnessed resuscitation. This article reviews current research showing the benefits of family-witnessed resuscitation, outlines how to successfully integrate a family facilitator during resuscitation, and includes research that has been effective in changing the prevailing attitudes of staff. The authors also argue for the resuscitation team to practice ethical and cultural humility when involving family members so that all resuscitation efforts are a success, whether the patient lives or dies...
November 2015: Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing: DCCN
Alexandra Sawyer, Susan Ayers, Sophia Bertullies, Margaret Thomas, Andrew D Weeks, Charles W Yoxall, Lelia Duley
OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to assess parents' views of immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at birth being provided beside the mother, and their experiences of a mobile trolley designed to facilitate this bedside care. DESIGN: Qualitative study with semistructured interviews. Results were analysed using thematic analysis. SETTING: Large UK maternity hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Mothers whose baby received initial neonatal care in the first few minutes of life at the bedside, and their birth partners, were eligible...
2015: BMJ Open
Natalia Sak-Dankosky, Paweł Andruszkiewicz, Paula R Sherwood, Tarja Kvist
AIMS: To examine factors associated with healthcare professionals' experiences and attitudes towards adult family-witnessed resuscitation in the emergency and intensive care units. BACKGROUND: Family-witnessed resuscitation offers the option for patients' families to be present during in-hospital resuscitation. It is important to understand healthcare professionals' views about this practice to determine why, despite its benefits and general recommendation, this practice has not been widely implemented...
November 2015: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Samantha DeWitt
BACKGROUND: There have been several studies published regarding family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR), but fewer studies regarding its effectiveness. In FWR, family members are invited to be present during resuscitation efforts of a loved one. This practice is recognized and approved by the Emergency Nurses Association. DISCUSSION: FWR is increasingly gaining attention, but is not without controversy. This practice is not widely accepted by hospital staff due to fear of legal claims, prolonging futile resuscitative efforts, and violent or abusive reactions from family members...
October 2015: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Ibrahim Bashayreh, Ahmad Saifan, Abdul-Monim Batiha, Stephen Timmons, Stuart Nairn
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To deepen our understanding of the perceptions of health professionals regarding family witnessed resuscitation in Jordanian adult critical care settings. BACKGROUND: The issue of family witnessed resuscitation has developed dramatically in the last three decades. The traditional practice of excluding family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation had been questioned. Family witnessed resuscitation has been described as good practice by many researchers and health organisations...
September 2015: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Jason E Buick, Katherine S Allan, Joel G Ray, Alexander Kiss, Paul Dorian, Peter Gozdyra, Laurie J Morrison
BACKGROUND: Traditional variables used to explain survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) account for only 72% of survival, suggesting that other unknown factors may influence outcomes. Research on other diseases suggests that neighbourhood factors may partly determine health outcomes. Yet, this approach has rarely been used for OHCA. This work outlines a methodology to investigate multiple neighbourhood factors as determinants of OHCA outcomes. METHODS: A retrospective, observational cohort study design will be used...
May 2015: CJEM
Sangeeta Lamba, Roxanne Nagurka, Michael Offin, Sandra R Scott
INTRODUCTION: The objective is to describe the implementation and outcomes of a structured communication module used to supplement case-based simulated resuscitation training in an emergency medicine (EM) clerkship. METHODS: We supplemented two case-based simulated resuscitation scenarios (cardiac arrest and blunt trauma) with role-play in order to teach medical students how to deliver news of death and poor prognosis to family of the critically ill or injured simulated patient...
March 2015: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Deborah P Waldrop, Brian Clemency, Heather A Lindstrom, Colleen Clemency Cordes
CONTEXT: Emergency 911 calls are often made when the end stage of an advanced illness is accompanied by alarming symptoms and substantial anxiety for family caregivers, particularly when an approaching death is not anticipated. How prehospital providers (paramedics and emergency medical technicians) manage emergency calls near death influences how and where people will die, if their end-of-life choices are upheld and how appropriately health care resources are used. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to explore and describe how prehospital providers assess and manage end-of-life emergency calls...
September 2015: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Angela M Bogle, Steven Go
Many physicians struggle with death-telling in sudden death. Families can be negatively impacted by suboptimal death-telling. Appropriate preparation and education can make death notification less stressful for the physician and may help decrease the development of pathologic grief in the surviving family members that can occur when death is unexpected. Although still controversial, there is a growing body of evidence that family witnessed resuscitation may be beneficial to the grieving process and desired by the public...
January 2015: Missouri Medicine
Susan W Salmond, Lisa M Paplanus, Amita Avadhani
Family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR) allows family members to be present while emergency cardiac life support measures are applied. This article describes the use of systematic reviews to inform best clinical policy on FWR. The authors searched Medline and CINAHL for relevant systematic reviews and retrieved four. The reviews were then tested for rigor and validity using the open source Critical Appraisal Skills Programme from the Institute of Health Science, University of Oxford. The reviews were assessed to be of acceptable quality and therefore good sources of evidence to guide practice and policy development...
December 2014: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing: Official Journal of the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses
Yoshio Tanaka, Tetsuo Maeda, Takahisa Kamikura, Taiki Nishi, Wataru Omi, Masaaki Hashimoto, Satoru Sakagami, Hideo Inaba
AIM: To investigate whether the bystander-patient relationship affects bystander response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and patient outcomes depending on the time of day. METHODS: This population-based observational study in Japan involving 139,265 bystander-witnessed OHCAs (90,426 family members, 10,479 friends/colleagues, and 38,360 others) without prehospital physician involvement was conducted from 2005 to 2009. Factors associated with better bystander response [early emergency call and bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BCPR)] and 1-month neurologically favourable survival were assessed...
January 2015: Resuscitation
Salvatore Mottillo, J Scott Delaney
CLINICAL QUESTION: What is the effect of family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on family members and the medical team? ARTICLE CHOSEN: Jabre P, Belpomme V, Azoulay E, et al. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. N Engl J Med 2013;368:1008-18. OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine whether systematically offering relatives the option to be present during cardiopulmonary resuscitation increases the proportion of relatives with posttraumatic stress disorder-related symptoms after 90 days...
November 2014: CJEM
Edison Ferreira de Paiva, Roberto de Queiroz Padilha, Jenny Karol Gomes Sato Sgobero, Fernando Ganem, Luiz Francisco Cardoso
OBJECTIVES: Community members should be trained so that witnesses of cardiac arrests are able to trigger the emergency system and perform adequate resuscitation. In this study, the authors evaluated the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training of communities in four Brazilian cities, using personal resuscitation manikins. METHODS: In total, 9,200 manikins were distributed in Apucarana, Itanhaém, Maringá, and São Carlos, which are cities where the populations range from 80,000 to 325,000 inhabitants...
August 2014: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Justine Monks, Maria Flynn
This exploratory study was grounded in a local initiative promoting family witnessed resuscitation in the critical care units of a regional cardio-thoracic centre in the United Kingdom (UK). Research in this field has focussed on the perceived benefits, or otherwise, of family involvement, but little is known about the impact this has on critical care nurses or their practice. This study aimed to gain insights into nurses' experience of family witnessed resuscitation and identify any implications for critical care practices...
December 2014: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing: the Official Journal of the British Association of Critical Care Nurses
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"