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Cognitive science

Henkjan Honing
In recent years, music and musicality have been the focus of an increasing amount of research effort. This has led to a growing role and visibility of the contribution of (bio)musicology to the field of neuroscience and cognitive sciences at large. While it has been widely acknowledged that there are commonalities between speech, language, and musicality, several researchers explain this by considering musicality as an epiphenomenon of language. However, an alternative hypothesis is that musicality is an innate and widely shared capacity for music that can be seen as a natural, spontaneously developing set of traits based on and constrained by our cognitive abilities and their underlying biology...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Vessela Stamenova, Brian Levine
Our objective was to review the literature and quantitatively summarise the effectiveness of Goal Management Training® (GMT) (alone or in combination with other training approaches) in improving executive functions in adult populations. Ovid, Scopus, Web of Science, and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global were searched for articles citing "goal management training". Any group trials (n > 3) in adults that used multiple-session GMT programmes were included in the analyses. Outcome variables were extracted and classified into one of nine cognitive measures domains: executive functioning tasks, everyday executive functioning tasks, subjective executive tasks rated by the patient, subjective executive tasks rated by proxy, working memory, speed of processing, long-term memory, instrumental activities of daily living and general mental health status questionnaires...
March 14, 2018: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
Livio Provenzi, Sara Broso, Rosario Montirosso
Preterm infants are hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and are precociously separated from their mothers. Although developmental care interventions are meant to facilitate mother-infant bonding, physical contact is not always possible. Maternal voice exposure has been proposed as a way to foster maternal closeness and support postnatal bonding. Here we present a systematic review on maternal voice effects on preterm infants' development. Literature search occurred on 4 databases (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL)...
March 10, 2018: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Michelle G Craske
The theme of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) 50th Anniversary was to honor the past and envision the future. From the wisdom, foresight, and determination of the pioneers of our organization, and the continuous upholding of the scientific method over the last 50 years, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has become the most empirically supported psychological treatment for a wide array of mental health problems. Yet, we still have a long way to go. This address outlines a vision for the future of CBT, which involves greater collaborative science, with all minds working together on the same problem, and greater attention to the risk factors and critical processes that underlie psychopathology and explain treatment change...
March 2018: Behavior Therapy
Dominic B Dwyer, Carlos Cabral, Lana Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Rachele Sanfelici, Joseph Kambeitz, Vince Calhoun, Peter Falkai, Christos Pantelis, Eva Meisenzahl, Nikolaos Koutsouleris
Identifying distinctive subtypes of schizophrenia could ultimately enhance diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. We aimed to uncover neuroanatomical subtypes of chronic schizophrenia patients to test whether stratification can enhance computer-aided discrimination of patients from control subjects. Unsupervised, data-driven clustering of structural MRI (sMRI) data was used to identify 2 subtypes of schizophrenia patients drawn from a US-based open science repository (n = 71) and we quantified classification improvements compared to controls (n = 74) using supervised machine learning...
February 26, 2018: Schizophrenia Bulletin
Yu-Lin Wu, Chun-Jen Huang, Su-Chen Fang, Ling-Hsin Ko, Pei-Shan Tsai
OBJECTIVE: Cognitive dysfunction has been reported in individuals with fibromyalgia. However, findings regarding cognitive function examined using neuropsychological tests have been inconsistent. The aim of the study was to determine domain-specific cognitive impairment in patients with fibromyalgia compared with healthy controls. METHODS: We conducted a meta-analysis that systematically searched six databases (PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Web of Science) for articles published before September 2017...
March 9, 2018: Psychosomatic Medicine
Wenke Cheng, Weijun Liu, Bin Li, Dongfang Li
BACKGROUND: Currently, it is considered that atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for cognitive impairment and dementia, which is independent of stroke. However, the relationship between anticoagulant drugs and cognitive function in patients with atrial fibrillation is unknown. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to complete a meta-analysis, and investigate the association between Anticoagulant therapy and cognitive impairment in patients undergoing AF. METHODS AND RESULTS: Two investigators systematically searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase databases and Web of Science for all studies showing associations...
March 2, 2018: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology
Jason N Itri, Sohil H Patel
OBJECTIVE: The field of cognitive science has provided important insights into mental processes underlying the interpretation of imaging examinations. Despite these insights, diagnostic error remains a major obstacle in the goal to improve quality in radiology. In this article, we describe several types of cognitive bias that lead to diagnostic errors in imaging and discuss approaches to mitigate cognitive biases and diagnostic error. CONCLUSION: Radiologists rely on heuristic principles to reduce complex tasks of assessing probabilities and predicting values into simpler judgmental operations...
March 12, 2018: AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology
Andrea R Zammit, Annie Robitaille, Andrea Piccinin, Graciela Muniz-Terrera, Scott M Hofer
Objectives: Grip strength and cognitive function reflect upper body muscle strength and mental capacities. Cross-sectional research has suggested that in old age these two processes are moderately to highly associated, and that an underlying common cause drives this association. Our aim was to synthesize and evaluate longitudinal research addressing whether changes in grip strength are associated with changes in cognitive function in healthy older adults. Methods: We systematically reviewed English-language research investigating the longitudinal association between repeated measures of grip strength and of cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults to evaluate the extent to which the two indices decline concurrently...
March 8, 2018: Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Judith Brenner, Jeffrey Bird, Samara B Ginzburg, Thomas Kwiatkowski, Vincent Papasodero, William Rennie, Elisabeth Schlegel, Olle Ten Cate, Joanne M Willey
BACKGROUND: Two dominant themes face medical education: developing integrated curricula and improving the undergraduate medical education (UME) to graduate medical education (GME) transition. An innovative solution to both of these challenges at the Zucker School of Medicine has been the application of the cognitive apprenticeship framework in requiring emergency medical technician (EMT) certification during the first course in medical school as the core on which to build an integrated curriculum and provide entrustable clinical skills...
March 8, 2018: Medical Teacher
Emiel Cracco, Lara Bardi, Charlotte Desmet, Oliver Genschow, Davide Rigoni, Lize De Coster, Ina Radkova, Eliane Deschrijver, Marcel Brass
Automatic imitation is the finding that movement execution is facilitated by compatible and impeded by incompatible observed movements. In the past 15 years, automatic imitation has been studied to understand the relation between perception and action in social interaction. Although research on this topic started in cognitive science, interest quickly spread to related disciplines such as social psychology, clinical psychology, and neuroscience. However, important theoretical questions have remained unanswered...
March 8, 2018: Psychological Bulletin
Christine Cuskley, Vittorio Loreto, Simon Kirby
A well-trod debate at the nexus of cognitive science and linguistics, the so-called past tense debate, has examined how rules and exceptions are individually acquired (McClelland & Patterson, ; Pinker & Ullman, ). However, this debate focuses primarily on individual mechanisms in learning, saying little about how rules and exceptions function from a sociolinguistic perspective. To remedy this, we use agent-based models to examine how rules and exceptions function across populations. We expand on earlier work by considering how repeated interaction and cultural transmission across speakers affects the dynamics of rules and exceptions in language, measuring linguistic outcomes within a social system rather than focusing individual learning outcomes...
March 8, 2018: Topics in Cognitive Science
Justyna O Ekert, Rebecca L Gould, Gemma Reynolds, Robert J Howard
OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors (TNF-αI) on Alzheimer's disease-associated pathology. DESIGN: A literature search of PubMed, Embase, PsychINFO, Web of Science, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library databases for human and animal studies that evaluated the use of TNF-αI was performed on 26 October 2016. RESULTS: The main outcomes assessed were cognition and behaviour, reduction in brain tissue mass, presence of plaques and tangles, and synaptic function...
March 7, 2018: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Samuel P L Veissière, Moriah Stendel
We present a deflationary account of smartphone addiction by situating this purportedly antisocial phenomenon within the fundamentally social dispositions of our species. While we agree with contemporary critics that the hyper-connectedness and unpredictable rewards of mobile technology can modulate negative affect, we propose to place the locus of addiction on an evolutionarily older mechanism: the human need to monitor and be monitored by others. Drawing from key findings in evolutionary anthropology and the cognitive science of religion, we articulate a hypernatural monitoring model of smartphone addiction grounded in a general social rehearsal theory of human cognition...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Aileen Eugenia Scully, Edwin Choon Wyn Lim, Pei Pei Teow, Dawn May Leng Tan
OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the evidence regarding the diagnostic value of simple ancillary tests post cerebrospinal fluid drainage in normal pressure hydrocephalus. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases; last searched on 12 September 2017. REVIEW METHODS: This review was performed applying the steps of the PRISMA statement. The QUADAS 2 tool was used to assess the risk of bias. Prospective and retrospective trials were systematically reviewed, and data on diagnostic accuracy were extracted...
February 1, 2018: Clinical Rehabilitation
Marie Hutchinson, Neil Wendt, Stuart Trevor Smith
The 2011 Productivity Commission report, Caring for Older Australians, observed that as the number of older Australians rises and the demand for aged care services increases, there will be a commensurate increase in demand for a well-trained aged care workforce. One of the significant issues impacting upon the ability of the aged services sector to respond to a growing number of older adults is to attract and retain sufficient numbers of staff. A number of factors are acknowledged to contribute to a failure of the aged care sector to attract and retain workers including: poor sector reputation, poor working conditions, including high client-staff ratios, a lack of career paths and professional development opportunities and low rates of remuneration...
2018: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
Douglas S Mennin, David M Fresco, Mia Skytte O'Toole, Richard G Heimberg
OBJECTIVE: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depression (MDD), especially when they co-occur, are associated with suboptimal treatment response. One common feature of these disorders is negative self-referential processing (NSRP; i.e., worry, rumination), which worsens treatment outcome. Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) integrates principles from affect science with traditional and contemporary cognitive-behavioral treatments to identify and modify the functional nature of NSRP by targeting motivational and regulatory mechanisms, as well as behavioral consequences...
March 2018: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Caroline A Smith, Mike Armour, Myeong Soo Lee, Li-Qiong Wang, Phillipa J Hay
BACKGROUND: Depression is recognised as a major public health problem that has a substantial impact on individuals and on society. People with depression may consider using complementary therapies such as acupuncture, and an increasing body of research has been undertaken to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression. This is the second update of this review. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of acupuncture for treatment of individuals with depression...
March 4, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
A C Reichelt, L E Stoeckel, L P Reagan, C A Winstanley, K A Page
Obesity is a world-wide crisis with profound healthcare and socio-economic implications and it is now clear that the central nervous system (CNS) is a target for the complications of metabolic disorders like obesity. In addition to decreases in physical activity and sedentary lifestyles, diet is proposed to be an important contributor to the etiology and progression of obesity. Unfortunately, there are gaps in our knowledge base related to how dietary choices impact the structural and functional integrity of the CNS...
March 1, 2018: Physiology & Behavior
Katherine Tan, Mei Chan Chong, Pathmawathy Subramaniam, Li Ping Wong
BACKGROUND: Outcome Based Education (OBE) is a student-centered approach of curriculum design and teaching that emphasize on what learners should know, understand, demonstrate and how to adapt to life beyond formal education. However, no systematic review has been seen to explore the effectiveness of OBE in improving the competencies of nursing students. OBJECTIVE: To appraise and synthesize the best available evidence that examines the effectiveness of OBE approaches towards the competencies of nursing students...
February 5, 2018: Nurse Education Today
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