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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292848/intestinal-epithelial-organoids-fuse-to-form-self-organizing-tubes-in-floating-collagen-gels
#1
Norman Sachs, Yoshiyuki Tsukamoto, Pekka Kujala, Peter J Peters, Hans Clevers
Multiple recent examples highlight how stem cells can self-organize in vitro to establish organoids that closely resemble their in vivo counterparts. Single Lgr5(+) mouse intestinal stem cells can be cultured under defined conditions forming ever-expanding epithelial organoids that retain cell polarization, cell type diversity and anatomical organization of the in vivo epithelium. Although exhibiting a remarkable level of self-organization, the so called 'mini-guts' have a closed cystic structure of microscopic size...
March 15, 2017: Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28275681/gastrointestinal-organoids-understanding-the-molecular-basis-of-the-host-microbe-interface
#2
REVIEW
David R Hill, Jason R Spence
In recent years, increasing attention has been devoted to the concept that microorganisms play an integral role in human physiology and pathophysiology. Despite this, the molecular basis of host-pathogen and host-symbiont interactions in the human intestine remains poorly understood owing to the limited availability of human tissue, and the biological complexity of host-microbe interactions. Over the past decade, technological advances have enabled long-term culture of organotypic intestinal tissue derived from human subjects and from human pluripotent stem cells, and these in vitro culture systems already have shown the potential to inform our understanding significantly of host-microbe interactions...
March 2017: Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191783/concise-review-the-potential-use-of-intestinal-stem-cells-to-treat-patients-with-intestinal-failure
#3
Sung Noh Hong, James C Y Dunn, Matthias Stelzner, Martín G Martín
Intestinal failure is a rare life-threatening condition that results in the inability to maintain normal growth and hydration status by enteral nutrition alone. Although parenteral nutrition and whole organ allogeneic transplantation have improved the survival of these patients, current therapies are associated with a high risk for morbidity and mortality. Development of methods to propagate adult human intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and pluripotent stem cells raises the possibility of using stem cell-based therapy for patients with monogenic and polygenic forms of intestinal failure...
February 2017: Stem Cells Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28159716/cellular-self-assembly-and-biomaterials-based-organoid-models-of-development-and-diseases
#4
REVIEW
Shivem B Shah, Ankur Singh
Organogenesis and morphogenesis have informed our understanding of physiology, pathophysiology, and avenues to create new curative and regenerative therapies. Thus far, this understanding has been hindered by the lack of a physiologically relevant yet accessible model that affords biological control. Recently, three-dimensional ex vivo cellular cultures created through cellular self-assembly under natural extracellular matrix cues or through biomaterial-based directed assembly have been shown to physically resemble and recapture some functionality of target organs...
January 31, 2017: Acta Biomaterialia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28123937/fermentable-carbohydrate-stimulates-ffar2-dependent-colonic-pyy-cell-expansion%C3%A2-to%C3%A2-increase-satiety
#5
Lucy Brooks, Alexander Viardot, Anastasia Tsakmaki, Emilie Stolarczyk, Jane K Howard, Patrice D Cani, Amandine Everard, Michelle L Sleeth, Arianna Psichas, Jelena Anastasovskaj, Jimmy D Bell, Kim Bell-Anderson, Charles R Mackay, Mohammad A Ghatei, Stephen R Bloom, Gary Frost, Gavin A Bewick
OBJECTIVE: Dietary supplementation with fermentable carbohydrate protects against body weight gain. Fermentation by the resident gut microbiota produces short-chain fatty acids, which act at free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2). Our aim was to test the hypothesis that FFAR2 is important in regulating the beneficial effects of fermentable carbohydrate on body weight and to understand the role of gut hormones PYY and GLP-1. METHODS: Wild-type or Ffar2(-/-) mice were fed an inulin supplemented or control diet...
January 2017: Molecular Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28097227/a-xenogeneic-free-system-generating-functional-human-gut-organoids-from-pluripotent-stem-cells
#6
Hajime Uchida, Masakazu Machida, Takumi Miura, Tomoyuki Kawasaki, Takuya Okazaki, Kengo Sasaki, Seisuke Sakamoto, Noriaki Ohuchi, Mureo Kasahara, Akihiro Umezawa, Hidenori Akutsu
Functional intestines are composed of cell types from all 3 primary germ layers and are generated through a highly orchestrated and serial developmental process. Directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has been shown to yield gut-specific cell types; however, these structures do not reproduce critical functional interactions between cell types of different germ layers. Here, we developed a simple protocol for the generation of mature functional intestinal organoids from hPSCs under xenogeneic-free conditions...
January 12, 2017: JCI Insight
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074039/cd34-mesenchymal-cells-are-a-major-component-of-the-intestinal-stem-cells-niche-at-homeostasis-and-after-injury
#7
Igor Stzepourginski, Giulia Nigro, Jean-Marie Jacob, Sophie Dulauroy, Philippe J Sansonetti, Gérard Eberl, Lucie Peduto
The intestinal epithelium is continuously renewed by intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) positioned at the base of each crypt. Mesenchymal-derived factors are essential to maintain IESCs; however, the cellular composition and development of such mesenchymal niche remains unclear. Here, we identify pericryptal CD34(+) Gp38(+) αSMA(-) mesenchymal cells closely associated with Lgr5(+) IESCs. We demonstrate that CD34(+) Gp38(+) cells are the major intestinal producers of the niche factors Wnt2b, Gremlin1, and R-spondin1, and are sufficient to promote maintenance of Lgr5(+) IESCs in intestinal organoids, an effect mainly mediated by Gremlin1...
January 24, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27640087/modeling-infectious-diseases-and-host-microbe-interactions-in-gastrointestinal-organoids
#8
REVIEW
Sina Bartfeld
Advances in stem cell research have allowed the development of 3-dimensional (3D) primary cell cultures termed organoid cultures, as they closely mimic the in vivo organization of different cell lineages. Bridging the gap between 2-dimensional (2D) monotypic cancer cell lines and whole organisms, organoids are now widely applied to model development and disease. Organoids hold immense promise for addressing novel questions in host-microbe interactions, infectious diseases and the resulting inflammatory conditions...
December 15, 2016: Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27638919/concise-review-the-potential-use-of-intestinal-stem-cells-to-treat-patients-with-intestinal-failure
#9
Sung Noh Hong, James C Y Dunn, Matthias Stelzner, Martín G Martín
: Intestinal failure is a rare life-threatening condition that results in the inability to maintain normal growth and hydration status by enteral nutrition alone. Although parenteral nutrition and whole organ allogeneic transplantation have improved the survival of these patients, current therapies are associated with a high risk for morbidity and mortality. Development of methods to propagate adult human intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and pluripotent stem cells raises the possibility of using stem cell-based therapy for patients with monogenic and polygenic forms of intestinal failure...
September 16, 2016: Stem Cells Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27628134/intestinal-organoids-as-a-novel-tool-to-study-microbes-epithelium-interactions
#10
Giulia Nigro, Melissa Hanson, Cindy Fevre, Marc Lecuit, Philippe J Sansonetti
The gut, particularly the colon, is the host of approximately 1000 bacterial species, the so-called gut microbiota. The relationship between the gut microbiota and the host is symbiotic and mutualistic, influencing many aspects of the biology of the host. This homeostatic balance can be disrupted by enteric pathogens, such as Shigella flexneri or Listeria monocytogenes, which are able to invade the epithelial layer and consequently subvert physiological functions. To study the host-microbe interactions in vitro, the crypt culture model, known as intestinal organoids, is a powerful tool...
September 15, 2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27573849/reg4-deep-crypt-secretory-cells-function-as-epithelial-niche-for-lgr5-stem-cells-in-colon
#11
Nobuo Sasaki, Norman Sachs, Kay Wiebrands, Saskia I J Ellenbroek, Arianna Fumagalli, Anna Lyubimova, Harry Begthel, Maaike van den Born, Johan H van Es, Wouter R Karthaus, Vivian S W Li, Carmen López-Iglesias, Peter J Peters, Jacco van Rheenen, Alexander van Oudenaarden, Hans Clevers
Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5(+)) stem cells reside at crypt bottoms of the small and large intestine. Small intestinal Paneth cells supply Wnt3, EGF, and Notch signals to neighboring Lgr5(+) stem cells. Whereas the colon lacks Paneth cells, deep crypt secretory (DCS) cells are intermingled with Lgr5(+) stem cells at crypt bottoms. Here, we report regenerating islet-derived family member 4 (Reg4) as a marker of DCS cells. To investigate a niche function, we eliminated DCS cells by using the diphtheria-toxin receptor gene knocked into the murine Reg4 locus...
September 13, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27521455/gastrointestinal-organoids-how-they-gut-it-out
#12
REVIEW
Sebastian R Merker, Jürgen Weitz, Daniel E Stange
The gastrointestinal tract is characterized by a self-renewing epithelium fueled by adult stem cells residing at the bottom of the intestinal crypt and gastric glands. Their activity and proliferation is strongly dependent on complex signaling pathways involving other crypt/gland cells as well as surrounding stromal cells. In recent years organoids are becoming increasingly popular as a new and powerful tool to study developmental or other biological processes. Organoids retain morphological and molecular patterns of the tissue they are derived from, are self-organizing, relatively simple to handle and accessible to genetic engineering...
December 15, 2016: Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27426971/emerging-technologies-for-gut-microbiome-research
#13
REVIEW
Jason W Arnold, Jeffrey Roach, M Andrea Azcarate-Peril
Understanding the importance of the gut microbiome on modulation of host health has become a subject of great interest for researchers across disciplines. As an intrinsically multidisciplinary field, microbiome research has been able to reap the benefits of technological advancements in systems and synthetic biology, biomaterials engineering, and traditional microbiology. Gut microbiome research has been revolutionized by high-throughput sequencing technology, permitting compositional and functional analyses that were previously an unrealistic undertaking...
November 2016: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27415403/-miniguts-from-plucked-human-hair-meet-crohn-s-disease
#14
M Hohwieler, S Renz, S Liebau, Q Lin, A Lechel, J Klaus, L Perkhofer, M Zenke, T Seufferlein, A Illing, M Müller, A Kleger
Human pluripotent stem cells represent a powerful tool to study human embryonic development and disease but also open up novel strategies for cell replacement therapies. Their capacity to give rise to every cell type of the human body, meanwhile, enables researchers to generate high yields of mesodermal, ectodermal, but also endodermal-derived tissues such as hepatic, pancreatic, or intestinal cells. Another progress in the field came with the advent of 3-dimensional culture conditions, so-called organoids, which facilitate maturation of stem cells and in turn more faithfully recapitulate human tissue architecture...
August 2016: Zeitschrift Für Gastroenterologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27315476/modeling-development-and-disease-with-organoids
#15
REVIEW
Hans Clevers
Recent advances in 3D culture technology allow embryonic and adult mammalian stem cells to exhibit their remarkable self-organizing properties, and the resulting organoids reflect key structural and functional properties of organs such as kidney, lung, gut, brain and retina. Organoid technology can therefore be used to model human organ development and various human pathologies 'in a dish." Additionally, patient-derived organoids hold promise to predict drug response in a personalized fashion. Organoids open up new avenues for regenerative medicine and, in combination with editing technology, for gene therapy...
June 16, 2016: Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27147463/the-third-dimension-new-developments-in-cell-culture-models-for-colorectal-research
#16
REVIEW
Joana F S Pereira, Nikhil T Awatade, Cláudia A Loureiro, Paulo Matos, Margarida D Amaral, Peter Jordan
Cellular models are important tools in various research areas related to colorectal biology and associated diseases. Herein, we review the most widely used cell lines and the different techniques to grow them, either as cell monolayer, polarized two-dimensional epithelia on membrane filters, or as three-dimensional spheres in scaffold-free or matrix-supported culture conditions. Moreover, recent developments, such as gut-on-chip devices or the ex vivo growth of biopsy-derived organoids, are also discussed. We provide an overview on the potential applications but also on the limitations for each of these techniques, while evaluating their contribution to provide more reliable cellular models for research, diagnostic testing, or pharmacological validation related to colon physiology and pathophysiology...
November 2016: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences: CMLS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27110583/fbxw7-associated-drug-resistance-is-reversed-by-induction-of-terminal-differentiation-in-murine-intestinal-organoid-culture
#17
Federica Lorenzi, Roya Babaei-Jadidi, Jonathan Sheard, Bradley Spencer-Dene, Abdolrahman S Nateri
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the top three cancer-related causes of death worldwide. FBXW7 is a known tumor-suppressor gene, commonly mutated in CRC and in a variety of other epithelial tumors. Low expression of FBXW7 is also associated with poor prognosis. Loss of FBXW7 sensitizes cancer cells to certain drugs, while making them more resistant to other types of chemotherapies. However, is not fully understood how epithelial cells within normal gut and primary tumors respond to potential cancer therapeutics...
2016: Molecular Therapy. Methods & Clinical Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27105910/organoids-as-an-ex%C3%A2-vivo-model-for-studying-the-serotonin-system-in-the-murine-small-intestine-and-colon-epithelium
#18
Takeshi Tsuruta, Shinichi Saito, Yosuke Osaki, Akihiro Hamada, Ayako Aoki-Yoshida, Kei Sonoyama
Intestinal organoids were recently established as an ex vivo model of the intestinal epithelium. The present study investigated the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system using organoids. Organoids from murine small intestinal and colonic crypts were successfully cultured. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that small intestinal and colonic organoids express mRNAs encoding tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) (the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis), serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), 5-HT receptor (HTR)2A, HTR2B, and HTR4...
May 20, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27086891/novel-approaches-tissue-engineering-and-stem-cells-in-vitro-modelling-of-the-gut
#19
REVIEW
Jorik M van Rijn, Kerstin Schneeberger, Caroline L Wiegerinck, Edward E S Nieuwenhuis, Sabine Middendorp
In many intestinal diseases, the function of the epithelial lining is impaired. In this review, we describe the recent developments of in vitro intestinal stem cell cultures. When these stem cells are grown in 3D structures (organoids), they provide a model of the intestinal epithelium, which is closely similar to the growth and development of the in vivo gut. This model provides a new tool to study various diseases of malabsorption in functional detail and therapeutic applications, which could not be achieved with traditional cell lines...
April 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26613604/mensenchymal-stem-cells-can-delay-radiation-induced-crypt-death-impact-on-intestinal-cd44-fragments
#20
Peng-Yu Chang, Xing Jin, Yi-Yao Jiang, Li-Xian Wang, Yong-Jun Liu, Jin Wang
Intestinal stem cells are primitive cells found within the intestinal epithelium that play a central role in maintaining epithelial homeostasis through self-renewal and commitment into functional epithelial cells. Several markers are available to identify intestinal stem cells, such as Lgr5, CD24 and EphB2, which can be used to sort intestinal stem cells from mammalian gut. Here, we identify and isolate intestinal stem cells from C57BL/6 mice by using a cell surface antigen, CD44. In vitro, some CD44(+) crypt cells are capable of forming "villus-crypt"-like structures (organoids)...
May 2016: Cell and Tissue Research
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