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Anti microbials

N Rostami, R C Shields, S A Yassin, A R Hawkins, L Bowen, T L Luo, A H Rickard, R Holliday, P M Preshaw, N S Jakubovics
Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been identified in the matrix of many different monospecies biofilms in vitro, including some of those produced by oral bacteria. In many cases, eDNA stabilizes the structure of monospecies biofilms. Here, the authors aimed to determine whether eDNA is an important component of natural, mixed-species oral biofilms, such as plaque on natural teeth or dental implants. To visualize eDNA in oral biofilms, approaches for fluorescently stained eDNA with either anti-DNA antibodies or an ultrasensitive cell-impermeant dye, YOYO-1, were first developed using Enterococcus faecalis, an organism that has previously been shown to produce extensive eDNA structures within biofilms...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Dental Research
Troy A Skwor, Stephanie Klemm, Hanyu Zhang, Brianna Schardt, Stephanie Blaszczyk, Matthew A Bork
Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance coupled with the lack of novel antibiotics threatens proper clinical treatment and jeopardizes their use in prevention. A photodynamic approach appears to be an innovative treatment option, even for multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria. Three components are utilized in photodynamic inactivation: a photosensitizer, light source, and oxygen. Variations in photosensitizers strongly influence microbial binding and bactericidal activity. In this study, four different cationic metalloporphyrins (Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Pd(2+), Zn(2+)) were compared to the free-base ligand 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin regarding their electronic properties and generation of reactive oxygen species upon subsequent 405nm violet-blue irradiation...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology
Siddharth Jain, Animesh Ray, Manish Soneja, S Leve Joseph Devarajan, Shyam Madabhushi, Anitha Swamy, T Naveen, S K Sharma
A known case of primary Sjogren's syndrome with chronic kidney disease presented with respiratory symptoms and subsequent altered sensorium. Chest imaging suggested cavitating lung lesions in both the lungs. Serum c-ANCA was positive without any upper respiratory tract involvement or active urinary sediments. Treatment with appropriate anti-microbials produced no improvement in the respiratory or neurological parameters. MRI brain revealed tell-tale signs of CNS vascultis. A diagnosis of GPA was made as per European Medical Agency algorithm and the patient was started on immune-suppressants to which there was dramatic response...
October 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Zhihao Jia, Huan Zhang, Shuai Jiang, Mengqiang Wang, Lingling Wang, Linsheng Song
C-type lectins (CTLs), a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-recognition proteins, are involved in nonself-recognition and pathogen elimination, and play crucial roles in the innate immunity. In the present study, two single CRD C-type lectins, CgCLec-4 and CgCLec-5, were identified from oyster Crassostrea gigas. The open reading frame (ORF) of CgCLec-4 and CgCLec-5 encoded polypeptides of 152 and 150 amino acids, respectively. Both CgCLec-4 and CgCLec-5 contained one CRD with six conserved cysteines to form three disulfide bridges...
October 17, 2016: Fish & Shellfish Immunology
Michael S Zhang, Jon C D Houtman
Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a monoglyceride with well characterized anti-microbial properties. Because of these properties, GML is widely used in food, cosmetics, and personal care products and currently being tested as a therapeutic for menstrual associated toxic shock syndrome, superficial wound infections, and HIV transmission. Recently, we have described that GML potently suppresses select T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling events, leading to reduced human T cell effector functions. However, how soluble host factors present in the blood and at sites of infection affect GML-mediated human T cell suppression is unknown...
2016: PloS One
(no author information available yet)
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common Gram-negative bacterium associated with nosocomial and life-threatening chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This pathogen is well-known for its ability to attach to surfaces of indwelling medical devices to form biofilms, which consist of a regular array of extracellular polymers. Tenaciously bound to the surface of devices and inherently resilient to antibiotic treatment, P. aeruginosa poses a serious threat in clinical medicine and contributes to the persistence of chronic infections...
October 19, 2016: Current Drug Targets
Bushra Jamil, Rashda Abbasi, Shahid Abbasi, Muhammad Imran, Siffat U Khan, Ayesha Ihsan, Sundus Javed, Habib Bokhari, Muhammad Imran
Natural antimicrobial agents, particularly essential oils present an excellent alternative to current antibiotics due to their potent and broad-spectrum antimicrobial potential, unique mechanisms of action and low tendency to induce resistance. However their potential as a viable therapeutic alternative is greatly compromised due to their hydrophobic and volatile nature. The objective of the current research was to explore the anti-pathogenic potential of essential oils in a bio-based nano-carrier system. Six different essential oils were tested on multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Saleh A Mohamed, Mohamed F Elshal, Taha A Kumosani, Alia M Aldahlawi, Tasneem A Basbrain, Fauziah A Alshehri, Hani Choudhry
Escherichia coli-derived L-asparaginases have been used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), however, clinical hypersensitivity reactions and silent inactivation due to antibodies against E. coli-asparaginase, lead to inactivation of these preparations in most cases.Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity and antitumor effects ofa novel L-asparaginaseenzyme, isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris seeds (P-Asp) on the ALL cell line (Jurkat). The immunogenicity of the enzyme was also evaluated in-vivo and results were compared to commercially available enzymes of microbial sources...
October 14, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
San-Lang Wang, Hsin-Ting Li, Li-Jie Zhang, Zhi-Hu Lin, Yao-Haur Kuo
The culture supernatant of Paenibacillus sp. TKU036, a bacterium isolated from Taiwanese soils, showed high antioxidant activity (85%) when cultured in a squid pen powder (SPP)-containing medium at 37 °C for three days. Homogentisic acid (2,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, HGA) was isolated and found to be the major antioxidant in the culture supernatant of the SPP-containing medium fermented by Paenibacillus sp. TKU036. Tryptophan was also present in the culture supernatant. The results of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprinting showed that HGA and tryptophan were produced via fermentation but did not pre-exist in the unfermented SPP-containing medium...
October 12, 2016: Marine Drugs
Myung-Shik Lee
Low-grade systemic inflammation in adipose tissues or liver, is an important etiologic factor in insulin resistance. LPS is an important element causing such metabolic inflammation, and intestinal flora is considered a major source of systemic LPS. We studied changes of intestinal microbiota associated with high-fat diet (HFD) that causes insulin resistance and metabolic stress. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that HFD significantly decreased the abundance of a mucin-degrading bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila compared to control diet...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Francesca Tamarozzi, Joseph D Turner, Nicolas Pionnier, Angela Midgley, Ana F Guimaraes, Kelly L Johnston, Steven W Edwards, Mark J Taylor
The endosymbiotic bacteria, Wolbachia, induce neutrophilic responses to the human helminth pathogen Onchocerca volvulus. The formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), has been implicated in anti-microbial defence, but has not been identified in human helminth infection. Here, we demonstrate NETs formation in human onchocerciasis. Extracellular NETs and neutrophils were visualised around O. volvulus in nodules excised from untreated patients but not in nodules from patients treated with the anti-Wolbachia drug, doxycycline...
October 18, 2016: Scientific Reports
Raida Zouari, Dorsaf Moalla-Rekik, Zouheir Sahnoun, Tarek Rebai, Semia Ellouze-Chaabouni, Dhouha Ghribi-Aydi
BACKGROUND: Lipopeptide microbial surfactants are endowed with unique surface properties as well as antimicrobial, anti-wrinkle, moisturizing and free radical scavenging activities. They were introduced safely in dermatological products, as long as they present low cytotoxicity against human cells. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant activities and the wound healing potential of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 lipopeptide biosurfactant on excision wounds induced in experimental rats...
October 14, 2016: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
Sushanto Gouda, Gitishree Das, Sandeep K Sen, Han-Seung Shin, Jayanta Kumar Patra
Endophytes are an endosymbiotic group of microorganisms that colonize in plants and microbes that can be readily isolated from any microbial or plant growth medium. They act as reservoirs of novel bioactive secondary metabolites, such as alkaloids, phenolic acids, quinones, steroids, saponins, tannins, and terpenoids that serve as a potential candidate for antimicrobial, anti-insect, anticancer and many more properties. While plant sources are being extensively explored for new chemical entities for therapeutic purposes, endophytic microbes also constitute an important source for drug discovery...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Kyungtaek Im, Jisu Kim, Hyeyoung Min
Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is a heat-processed ginseng developed by the repeated steaming and air-drying of fresh ginseng. Compared with fresh ginseng, KRG has been shown to possess greater pharmacological activities and stability because of changes that occur in its chemical constituents during the steaming process. In addition to anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and immune-modulatory activities, KRG and its purified components have also been shown to possess protective effects against microbial infections. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the properties of KRG and its components on infections with human pathogenic viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, influenza virus, human immunodeficiency virus, human herpes virus, hepatitis virus, norovirus, rotavirus, enterovirus, and coxsackievirus...
October 2016: Journal of Ginseng Research
Yoshitaka Hosokawa, Ikuko Hosokawa, Satoru Shindo, Yoshihiro Ohta, Kazumi Ozaki, Takashi Matsuo
Alkannin, which is found in Alkanna tinctoria, a member of the borage family, is used as a food coloring. Alkannin has recently been reported to have certain biological functions, such as anti-microbial and anti-oxidant effects. It is known that CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 5-positive leukocytes contribute to alveolar bone resorption in periodontal lesions. The aim of this study was to examine whether alkannin inhibits the production of CC chemokine ligand (CCL) 3 and CCL5, which are CCR5 ligands, in human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLC)...
October 15, 2016: Cell Biology International
Edith Lahner, Bruno Annibale
Diverticular disease (DD) is a common gastrointestinal condition. Clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic uncomplicated or complicated DD. Symptoms related to uncomplicated DD are not specific and may be indistinguishable from those of irritable bowel syndrome. Low-grade inflammation, altered intestinal microbiota, visceral hypersensitivity, and abnormal colonic motility have been identified as factors potentially contributing to symptoms. Probiotics may modify the gut microbial balance leading to health benefits...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Sarah A Ross, Jonathan A Lane, Mariarosaria Marotta, Devon Kavanaugh, Joseph Thomas Ryan, Lokesh Joshi, Rita M Hickey
Milk oligosaccharides have many associated bioactivities which can contribute to human health and offer protective properties to the host. Such bioactivities include anti-infective properties whereby oligosaccharides interact with bacterial cells and prevent adhesion to the host and subsequent colonization. Milk oligosaccharides have also been shown to alter the glycosylation of intestinal cells, leading to a reduction in pathogenic colonization. In addition, these sugars promote adhesion of commensal bacterial strains to host cells as well as possessing the ability to alter mucin expression in intestinal cells and improve barrier function...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Naomi H Philip, Alexandra DeLaney, Lance W Peterson, Melanie Santos-Marrero, Jennifer T Grier, Yan Sun, Meghan A Wynosky-Dolfi, Erin E Zwack, Baofeng Hu, Tayla M Olsen, Anthony Rongvaux, Scott D Pope, Carolina B López, Andrew Oberst, Daniel P Beiting, Jorge Henao-Mejia, Igor E Brodsky
Caspases regulate cell death programs in response to environmental stresses, including infection and inflammation, and are therefore critical for the proper operation of the mammalian immune system. Caspase-8 is necessary for optimal production of inflammatory cytokines and host defense against infection by multiple pathogens including Yersinia, but whether this is due to death of infected cells or an intrinsic role of caspase-8 in TLR-induced gene expression is unknown. Caspase-8 activation at death signaling complexes results in its autoprocessing and subsequent cleavage and activation of its downstream apoptotic targets...
October 2016: PLoS Pathogens
Takahiko Toyonaga, Minoru Matsuura, Kiyoshi Mori, Yusuke Honzawa, Naoki Minami, Satoshi Yamada, Taku Kobayashi, Toshifumi Hibi, Hiroshi Nakase
Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), also called neutrophil gelatinase B-associated lipocalin (NGAL), is an anti-microbial peptide originally identified in neutrophil granules. Although Lcn2/NGAL expression is increased in the inflamed intestinal tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, the role of Lcn2/NGAL in the development of intestinal inflammation remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of Lcn2/NGAL in intestinal inflammation using a spontaneous mouse colitis model, interleukin-10 knock out (IL-10 KO) mice...
October 13, 2016: Scientific Reports
Sascha Rutz, Wenjun Ouyang
Interleukin (IL)-10 is an essential anti-inflammatory cytokine that plays important roles as a negative regulator of immune responses to microbial antigens. Loss of IL-10 results in the spontaneous development of inflammatory bowel disease as a consequence of an excessive immune response to the gut microbiota. IL-10 also functions to prevent excessive inflammation during the course of infection. IL-10 can be produced in response to pro-inflammatory signals by virtually all immune cells, including T cells, B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
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