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Glial cells

Mariella G Filbin, Dominik Sturm
Gliomas are the most common primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms in children and adolescents and are thought to arise from their glial progenitors or stem cells. Although the exact cells of origin for most pediatric gliomas remain to be identified, our current understanding is that specific cell populations during CNS development are susceptible to particular oncogenic events during certain time windows and thus give rise to pediatric gliomas with distinct histological, molecular, and clinical features...
February 2018: Seminars in Neurology
Ariana Sherdil, Stéphan Chabardès, Isabelle Guillemain, Sandrine Michallat, Shivadatta Prabhu, Karine Pernet-Gallay, Olivier David, Brigitte Piallat
PURPOSE: Our objective was to propose a new on demand non-human primate model of mesial temporal lobe seizures suitable for pre-clinical innovative therapeutic research. METHODS: Five macaques were stereotaxically implanted unilaterally with a deep recording electrode in the hippocampus. For each experiment, penicillin was injected into the hippocampus and animals were monitored during five consecutive hours. A total of 12-27 experiments with a mean cumulative dose of 162644 ± 70190 UI of penicillin have been performed per animal Injections were repeated at least once a week over a period of 98-276 days...
March 9, 2018: Epilepsy Research
Alejandra Catenaccio, Felipe A Court
Glial cells regulate a wide variety of neuronal functions during physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, the study of glial cells and their association with axons is of paramount importance in order to understand the physiology of the nervous system. This chapter describes a detailed protocol to prepare and stain teased nerve fibers from peripheral nerves using fluorescent indirect immunolabeling and staining with vital dyes. For immunofluorescence analysis, we describe techniques to study the axonal compartment and the expression of cytoplasmic and plasma membrane proteins in Schwann cells...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
Rhona Mirsky, Kristjan R Jessen
Schwann cell precursors are the first defined stage in the generation of Schwann cells from the neural crest and represent the glial cell of embryonic nerves. Highly pure cultures of these cells can be obtained by enzymatic dissociation of nerves dissected from the limbs of 14- or 12-day-old rat and mouse embryos, respectively. Since Schwann cell precursors, unlike Schwann cells, are acutely dependent on axonal signals for survival, they require addition of trophic factors, typically β-neuregulin-1, for maintenance in cell culture...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
Ke-Wei Tian, Yuan-Yuan Zhang, Hong Jiang, Shu Han
The placenta has emerged as an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) because of the absence of ethical issues, non-invasive access, and abundant yield. However, inflammatory cell invasion into grafts negatively impacts the survival and efficacy of transplanted cells. Previous studies have shown that synthetic C16 peptide can competitively block the transmigration of leukocytes into the central nerve system, while angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) can inhibit inflammation-induced blood vessel leakage and inflammatory cell infiltration in rats with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)...
March 15, 2018: Scientific Reports
Giulia Cisbani, Audrey Le Behot, Marie-Michèle Plante, Paul Préfontaine, Manon Lecordier, Serge Rivest
Stroke is the second cause of mortality worldwide and occurs following the interruption of cerebral blood circulation by cerebral vessel burst or subsequent to a local thrombus formation. Ischemic lesion triggers an important inflammatory response, characterized by massive infiltration of leukocytes, activation of glial cells and neurovascular reorganization. Chemokines and their receptors, such as CCR2 and CX3CR1, play an important role in leukocyte recruitment in the damaged area. Mice genetically depleted for the two receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 underwent focal cerebral ischemia, based on the topical application of ferric chloride to truncate the distal middle cerebral artery...
March 12, 2018: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Daniel J Dennis, Sisu Han, Carol Schuurmans
The formation of functional neural circuits in the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) requires that appropriate numbers of the correct types of neuronal and glial cells are generated in their proper places and times during development. In the embryonic CNS, multipotent progenitor cells first acquire regional identities, and then undergo precisely choreographed temporal identity transitions (i.e. time-dependent changes in their identity) that determine how many neuronal and glial cells of each type they will generate...
March 12, 2018: Brain Research
Bin Du, You-Quan Ding, Xia Xiao, Hong-Yi Ren, Bing-Yin Su, Jian-Guo Qi
BACKGROUND: Antigen-specific and MHCII-restricted CD4+ αβ T cells have been shown or suggested to play an important role in the transition from acute to chronic mechanical allodynia after peripheral nerve injuries. However, it is still largely unknown where these T cells infiltrate along the somatosensory pathways transmitting mechanical allodynia to initiate the development of chronic mechanical allodynia after nerve injuries. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to ascertain the definite neuroimmune interface for these T cells to initiate the development of chronic mechanical allodynia after peripheral nerve injuries...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Dasa Cizkova, Veronika Cubinkova, Tomas Smolek, Adriana-Natalia Murgoci, Jan Danko, Katarina Vdoviakova, Filip Humenik, Milan Cizek, Jusal Quanico, Isabelle Fournier, Michel Salzet
It was recently shown that the conditioned medium (CM) of mesenchymal stem cells can enhance viability of neural and glial cell populations. In the present study, we have investigated a cell-free approach via CM from rat bone marrow stromal cells (MScCM) applied intrathecally (IT) for spinal cord injury (SCI) recovery in adult rats. Functional in vitro test on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) primary cultures confirmed biological properties of collected MScCM for production of neurosphere-like structures and axon outgrowth...
March 15, 2018: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Ekaterina Turlova, Zhong-Ping Feng, Hong-Shuo Sun
Stroke is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide, yet novel therapeutic treatments for this condition are lacking. This review focuses on the roles of the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) ion channels in cellular damage following hypoxia-ischemia and their potential as a future therapeutic target for stroke. Here, we highlight the complex molecular signaling that takes place in neurons, glial cells and the blood-brain barrier following ischemic insult. We also describe the evidence of TRPM2 involvement in these processes, as shown from numerous in vitro and in vivo studies that utilize genetic and pharmacological approaches...
March 15, 2018: Acta Pharmacologica Sinica
John R Apps, Gabriela Carreno, Jose Mario Gonzalez-Meljem, Scott Haston, Romain Guiho, Julie E Cooper, Saba Manshaei, Nital Jani, Annett Hölsken, Benedetta Pettorini, Robert J Beynon, Deborah M Simpson, Helen C Fraser, Ying Hong, Shirleen Hallang, Thomas J Stone, Alex Virasami, Andrew M Donson, David Jones, Kristian Aquilina, Helen Spoudeas, Abhijit R Joshi, Richard Grundy, Lisa C D Storer, Márta Korbonits, David A Hilton, Kyoko Tossell, Selvam Thavaraj, Mark A Ungless, Jesus Gil, Rolf Buslei, Todd Hankinson, Darren Hargrave, Colin Goding, Cynthia L Andoniadou, Paul Brogan, Thomas S Jacques, Hywel J Williams, Juan Pedro Martinez-Barbera
Adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas (ACPs) are clinically challenging tumours, the majority of which have activating mutations in CTNNB1. They are histologically complex, showing cystic and solid components, the latter comprised of different morphological cell types (e.g. β-catenin-accumulating cluster cells and palisading epithelium), surrounded by a florid glial reaction with immune cells. Here, we have carried out RNA sequencing on 18 ACP samples and integrated these data with an existing ACP transcriptomic dataset...
March 14, 2018: Acta Neuropathologica
Augusta Pisanu, Laura Boi, Giovanna Mulas, Saturnino Spiga, Sandro Fenu, Anna R Carta
Neuroinflammation is a main component of Parkinson's disease (PD) neuropathology, where unremitting reactive microglia and microglia-secreted soluble molecules such as cytokines, contribute to the neurodegenerative process as part of an aberrant immune reaction. Besides, pro-inflammatory cytokines, predominantly TNF-α, play an important neuromodulatory role in the healthy and diseased brain, being involved in neurotransmitter metabolism, synaptic scaling and brain plasticity. Recent preclinical studies have evidenced an exacerbated neuroinflammatory reaction in the striatum of parkinsonian rats that developed dyskinetic responses following L-DOPA administration...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Neural Transmission
Kedarlal Sharma, JuhiSingh, Emma E Frost, Prakash P Pillai
MethylCpG binding protein-2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator and essential for brain development.MeCP2 mutations are associated with a spectrum of neuro-developmental disorders that vary depending on the patient gender, most notably Rett Syndrome. MeCP2 is essential for normal neuronal maturation, and glial cell function in the brain. Besides, its role in neurodevelopmental disorders, MeCP2 is involved in many cancers such as breast, colorectal, lung, liver, and prostate cancer. Glioma is the most lethal form of brain cancer...
March 11, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
Beiqing Wu, Jianhui Liu, Runze Zhao, Yuju Li, Justin Peer, Alexander L Braun, Lixia Zhao, Yi Wang, Zenghan Tong, Yunlong Huang, Jialin C Zheng
BACKGROUND: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important in the intercellular communication of the central nervous system, and their release is increased during neuroinflammation. Our previous data demonstrated an increased release of EVs during HIV-1 infection and immune activation in glial cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which infection and inflammation increase EV release remains unknown. In the current study, we investigated the role of glutaminase 1 (GLS1)-mediated glutaminolysis and the production of a key metabolic intermediate α-ketoglutarate on EV release...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Yingqian Peng, Edouard Baulier, Yifeng Ke, Alejandra Young, Novruz B Ahmedli, Steven D Schwartz, Debora B Farber
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by virtually every cell of all organisms are involved in processes of intercellular communication through the delivery of their functional mRNAs, proteins and bioactive lipids. We previously demonstrated that mouse embryonic stem cell-released EVs (mESEVs) are able to transfer their content to different target retinal cells, inducing morphological and biochemical changes in them. The main objective of this paper is to characterize EVs derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESEVs) and investigate the effects that they have on cultured retinal glial, progenitor Müller cells, which are known to give rise to retinal neurons under specific conditions...
2018: PloS One
Chaoyu Liu, Chong Wang, Qilong Zhao, Xiaohua Li, Feiyue Xu, Xumei Yao, Min Wang
Electrospun fibrous scaffolds have been extensively used as cell-supporting matrices or delivery vehicles for various biomolecules in tissue engineering. Biodegradable scaffolds with tunable degradation behaviors are favorable for various resorbable tissue replacements. In nerve tissue engineering, delivery of growth factors (GFs) such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) from scaffolds can be used to promote peripheral nerve repair. In this study, using the established dual-source dual-power (DS-DP) electrospinning technique, bicomponent scaffolds incorporated with NGF and GDNF were designed and demonstrated as a strategy to develop scaffolds providing dual GF delivery...
March 14, 2018: Biomedical Materials
A V Revishchin, G M Solus, I I Poletaeva, G V Pavlova
Using immunoblotting, we showed that in rats of audiogenic epilepsy (AE) prone strain (Krushinsky- Molodkina, KM) the superior colliculus tissue (SC) contains significantly less quantity of glial neurotrophic factor (GDNF), beta-tubulin and actin in comparison to the same brain region in "0" rats, nonprone to AE. This fact led to the suggestion that the histological structure of the SC in KM rats could differ significantly from that of the "0" strain. Using neuromorphologу technique, we demonstrated that the total number of SC cells, as well as the number of neurons were significantly less in KM rats than in the "0" strain rats...
January 2018: Doklady. Biochemistry and Biophysics
Juan R Martinez-Galan, Ana Verdejo, Elena Caminos
Disturbances in calcium homeostasis due to canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) and/or store-operated calcium (SOC) channels can play a key role in a large number of brain disorders. TRPC channels are plasma membrane cation channels included in the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily. The most widely distributed member of the TRPC subfamily in the brain is TRPC1, which is frequently linked to group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and to the components of SOC channels. Proposing TRPC/SOC channels as a therapeutic target in neurological diseases previously requires a detailed knowledge of the distribution of such molecules in the brain...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
Boldizsár Czéh, Szilvia A Nagy
Depressive disorders are complex, multifactorial mental disorders with unknown neurobiology. Numerous theories aim to explain the pathophysiology. According to the "gliocentric theory", glial abnormalities are responsible for the development of the disease. The aim of this review article is to summarize the rapidly growing number of cellular and molecular evidences indicating disturbed glial functioning in depressive disorders. We focus here exclusively on the clinical studies and present the in vivo neuroimaging findings together with the postmortem molecular and histopathological data...
2018: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Hai-Bin Tang, Xiao-Jian Jiang, Chen Wang, Shi-Chang Liu
Pericytes have long been regarded merely to maintain structural and functional integrity of blood-brain barrier (BBB). Nevertheless, it has also been identified as a component of scar-forming stromal cells after spinal cord injury (SCI). In process of enlargement of spinal cavity after SCI, the number of pericytes increased and outnumbered astrocytes. However, the mechanism of proliferation of pericytes remains unclear. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play important roles in the formation of glia scar, but previous studies had paid more attention to the astrocytes...
March 10, 2018: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
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