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Pediatric syncope

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29222399/pediatric-disorders-of-orthostatic-intolerance
#1
REVIEW
Julian M Stewart, Jeffrey R Boris, Gisela Chelimsky, Phillip R Fischer, John E Fortunato, Blair P Grubb, Geoffrey L Heyer, Imad T Jarjour, Marvin S Medow, Mohammed T Numan, Paolo T Pianosi, Wolfgang Singer, Sally Tarbell, Thomas C Chelimsky
Orthostatic intolerance (OI), having difficulty tolerating an upright posture because of symptoms or signs that abate when returned to supine, is common in pediatrics. For example, ∼40% of people faint during their lives, half of whom faint during adolescence, and the peak age for first faint is 15 years. Because of this, we describe the most common forms of OI in pediatrics and distinguish between chronic and acute OI. These common forms of OI include initial orthostatic hypotension (which is a frequently seen benign condition in youngsters), true orthostatic hypotension (both neurogenic and nonneurogenic), vasovagal syncope, and postural tachycardia syndrome...
December 8, 2017: Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29165759/transient-receptor-potential-melastatin-4-cation-channel-in-pediatric-heart-block
#2
J Tian, X-J An, M-Y Fu
Progressive cardiac conduction disease (PCCD) is a common pediatric heart conduction disorder. It is an autosomal inheritance of rare mutations, which leads to familial cases of PCCD. In these cases, the His-Purkinje system's conductive capacity is progressively deranged, involving either right or left bundle branch block. Also, QRS complexes display widening is an important characteristic that culminates in complete AV block, syncope, and sudden death. Mutations in TRPM4 gene that encodes for transient receptor potential melastatin 4 have recently been reported to cause familial cases of PCCD and heart block...
October 2017: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29135903/micturition-syncope-in-childhood-how-to-recognize-and-manage-it
#3
Pierluigi Marzuillo, Stefano Guarino, Vincenzo Tipo, Andrea Apicella, Anna Grandone, Mario Diplomatico, Cesare Polito, Emanuele Miraglia Del Giudice, Angela La Manna, Laura Perrone
Frequently, general pediatricians could face a patient with syncope, which represents approximately 1% to 3% of emergency visits. Micturition syncope is a transient loss of consciousness with onset immediately before, during, or after micturition. Literature evidence indicates that healthy young men are a population with major risk for presenting micturition syncope, with a peak of incidence around 40 to 50 years of age. Usually, this syncope occurs in the morning, after wake-up, or, more generally, when the male patients assume the orthostatic position after a period of supine position in a warm bed...
November 14, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29119462/syncope-in-pediatric-practice
#4
REVIEW
Pratibha Singhi, Arushi Gahlot Saini
Syncope is defined as a sudden, self-limited loss of consciousness and postural tone followed by spontaneous and complete recovery without any neurological sequelae. It is one of the most common paroxysmal disorders in children and adolescents. The three major causes of syncope in children are neural, cardiovascular and other non-cardiovascular causes. The common unifying mechanism is transient global hypoperfusion of the brain. The diagnosis is primarily clinical and objective laboratory investigations add little to the diagnosis in children especially in neurocardiogenic subtype...
November 9, 2017: Indian Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28926844/atypical-presentation-of-a-pediatric-cerebellar-ganglioglioma
#5
Richard Bram, Roberta J Seidman, David Chesler
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Gangliogliomas (GGs) are rare central nervous system tumors occurring primarily in the supratentorial compartment with infratentorial instances most often involving the brain stem. Infratentorial GGs typically present with signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure (ICP), cranial nerve deficits, or focal cerebellar findings; rarely, these tumors have been associated with focal seizures. METHODS: In this report, we describe an atypical presentation of a cerebellar GG in a 20-month-old male who initially presented with syncope and emesis in the absence of electrographic evidence of seizures, radiographic evidence of hydrocephalus, or elevated ICP...
September 20, 2017: Pediatric Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28888565/the-use-of-echocardiography-for-pediatric-patients-presenting-with-syncope
#6
Jonathan H Pelletier, Sarah Blanchard, Reid C Chamberlain, Christoph P Hornik, Michael J Campbell, Kevin D Hill
OBJECTIVES: To assess the frequency, yield, and cost of echocardiograms meeting "rarely appropriate" criteria. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective, single-center study of pediatric patients presenting with syncope. Patients were categorized according to the appropriate use criteria and based upon location of care (emergency department only, primary care setting only, or referred to a pediatric cardiologist). Multivariable regression was used to determine factors associated with performance of a "rarely appropriate" echocardiogram...
November 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28749111/syncope-in-pediatric-patients-a-practical-approach-to-differential-diagnosis-and-management-in-the-emergency-department-digest
#7
Colleen Fant, Ari Cohen, Michelle N Vazquez
Syncope is a condition that is often seen in the emergency department. Most syncope is benign, but it can be a symptom of a life-threatening condition. While syncope often requires an extensive workup in adults, in the pediatric population, critical questioning and simple, noninvasive testing is usually sufficient to exclude significant or life-threatening causes. For low-risk patients, resource-intensive workups are rarely diagnostic, and add significant cost to medical care. This issue will highlight critical diseases that cause syncope, identify high-risk "red flags," and enable the emergency clinician to develop a cost-effective, minimally invasive algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric syncope...
April 22, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28719089/development-and-implementation-of-an-emergency-department-telephone-follow-up-system
#8
O John Ma, Mary Tanski, Beech Burns, Elizabeth F Spizman, James A Heilman
Implementing a telephone follow-up system after a patient's emergency department (ED) visit is challenging, but it may improve patient safety and care. This study's objective was to describe the development and implementation of a comprehensive ED telephone follow-up system over a 9-year period. Discharged patients who received a follow-up telephone call within 48 hours of their ED visit included all pediatric patients, those who left without being seen by a provider, and any adult patient with a "high-risk chief complaint," which was defined as a headache, visual problem, chest pain, dyspnea, abdominal pain, syncope, trauma, and neurological-related problems...
July 2017: Journal of Healthcare Risk Management: the Journal of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669108/novel-genetic-variants-in-bag3-and-tnnt2-in-a-swedish-family-with-a-history-of-dilated-cardiomyopathy-and-sudden-cardiac-death
#9
Eva Fernlund, A Wålinder Österberg, E Kuchinskaya, M Gustafsson, K Jansson, C Gunnarsson
Familial dilated cardiomyopathy is a rare cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), especially in childhood. Our aim was to describe the clinical course and the genetic variants in a family where the proband was a four-month-old infant presenting with respiratory problems due to DCM. In the family, there was a strong family history of DCM and sudden cardiac death in four generations. DNA was analyzed initially from the deceased girl using next-generation sequencing including 50 genes involved in cardiomyopathy...
August 2017: Pediatric Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523341/cost-of-unnecessary-testing-in-the-evaluation-of-pediatric-syncope
#10
Connor Redd, Cameron Thomas, Martha Willis, Michelle Amos, Jeffrey Anderson
Syncope is a common and a typically benign clinical problem in children and adolescents. The majority of tests ordered in otherwise healthy pediatric patients presenting with syncope have low diagnostic yield. This study quantifies testing and corresponding patient charges in a group of pediatric patients presenting for outpatient evaluation for syncope. Patients seen between 3/2011 and 4/2013 in the multi-disciplinary Syncope Clinic at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center were enrolled in a registry which was reviewed for patient information...
August 2017: Pediatric Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28491761/use-of-biotronik-closed-loop-pacemaker-to-treat-recurrent-syncope-in-pediatric-patient-with-dysautonomia
#11
Jennfier Shortland, Orhan Uzun, Deirdre Wilson, Graham A Stuart, Mark A Walsh
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: HeartRhythm Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429690/-our-experience-in-the-diagnosis-and-treatment-of-postural-orthostatic-tachycardia-syndrome-vasovagal-syncope-and-inappropriate-sinus-tachycardia-in-children
#12
Sezen Ugan Atik, Reyhan Dedeoğlu, Aida Koka, Funda Öztunç
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to share our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of patients who presented at our clinic with syncope, pre-syncope, dizziness, and palpitations. STUDY DESIGN: Patients who were treated at pediatric cardiology clinic for complaints of syncope, dizziness, and palpitations between 2014 and 2016 were enrolled in the study. Detailed history of the patients, physical examination findings, laboratory and electrocardiogram results were recorded...
April 2017: Türk Kardiyoloji Derneği Arşivi: Türk Kardiyoloji Derneğinin Yayın Organıdır
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425226/a-review-of-pediatric-pulmonary-hypertension-with-new-guidelines
#13
Serdar Kula, Ayhan Pektaş
This study aims to review pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) by comparing the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/European Respiratory Society (ERS), the American Heart Association (AHA)/American Thoracic Society (ATS), and the European Pediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network (EPPVDN). All three sets of guidelines define PH as having a mean pulmonary artery pressure of ≥25 mmHg and accept the validity of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification system. Every child with a high index of suspicion for PH should undergo an initial work-up of chest X-rays, electrocardiography, and echocardiography...
April 18, 2017: Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28362251/syncope-in-pediatric-patients-a-practical-approach-to-differential-diagnosis-and-management-in-the-emergency-department
#14
Collen Fant, Arl Cohen
Syncope is a condition that is often seen in the emergency department. Most syncope is benign, but it can be a symptom of a life-threatening condition. While syncope often requires an extensive workup in adults, in the pediatric population, critical questioning and simple, noninvasive testing is usually sufficient to exclude significant or life-threatening causes. For low-risk patients, resource-intensive workups are rarely diagnostic, and add significant cost to medical care. This issue will highlight critical diseases that cause syncope, identify high-risk "red flags," and enable the emergency clinician to develop a cost-effective, minimally invasive algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric syncope...
April 2017: Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303324/short-qt-syndrome-in-pediatrics
#15
REVIEW
Roberta Pereira, Oscar Campuzano, Georgia Sarquella-Brugada, Sergi Cesar, Anna Iglesias, Josep Brugada, Fernando E S Cruz Filho, Ramon Brugada
Short QT syndrome is a malignant cardiac disease characterized by the presence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias leading to syncope and sudden cardiac death. Currently, international guidelines establish diagnostic criteria when QTc is below 340 ms. This entity is one of the main diseases responsible for sudden cardiac death in the pediatric population. In recent years, clinical, genetic and molecular advances in pathophysiological mechanisms related to short QT syndrome have improved diagnosis, risk stratification, and preventive measures...
June 2017: Clinical Research in Cardiology: Official Journal of the German Cardiac Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259302/temporal-trends-in-utilization-of-transthoracic-echocardiography-for-common-outpatient-pediatric-cardiology-diagnoses-over-the-past-15%C3%A2-years
#16
Ritu Sachdeva, Curtis D Travers, Courtney E McCracken, Cyrus Samai, Robert M Campbell, Timothy C Slesnick, William L Border
BACKGROUND: No data exist regarding the temporal trends in utilization of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in an outpatient pediatric cardiology setting. This study evaluates the trends in utilization of TTE for common diagnoses known to have low diagnostic yield and the factors influencing these trends. METHODS: Patients evaluated at our pediatric cardiology clinics from January 2000 to December 2014 and discharged with final diagnoses of innocent murmur, noncardiac chest pain, benign syncope, and palpitations were included...
March 2017: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240408/tilt-table-testing-to-diagnose-pseudosyncope-in-the-pediatric-population
#17
Jeffrey A Robinson, Jill K Shivapour, Christopher S Snyder
OBJECTIVE: Pseudosyncope can be difficult to distinguish from true syncope. Often, pediatric patients with pseudosyncope undergo multiple tests and referrals before the appropriate diagnosis is reached. The purpose is to describe the utility of the head-up tilt table test to elicit the diagnosis of pseudosyncope in the pediatric population. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review from November 2012 to December 2015 of patients age ≤23 years referred for 30-minute, 80-degree tilt table test...
July 2017: Congenital Heart Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220574/selective-use-of-the-electrocardiogram-in-pediatric-preparticipation-athletic-examinations-among-pediatric-primary-care-providers
#18
Bradley C Clark, Joshua M Hayman, Charles I Berul, Kristin M Burns, Jonathan R Kaltman
OBJECTIVES: Recent literature examining insurance administrative data suggests that a selective approach, with concurrent history and physical exam (H&P), for obtaining an electrocardiogram (ECG) as a part of a preparticipation examination (PPE) for pediatric athletes is commonly used in the primary care setting demonstrating a high rate of disease detection. We sought to understand practice patterns of providers with regard to usage of ECG as a part of PPE. METHODS: Utilizing an online survey, we queried primary care providers regarding their practice patterns, rationale, and concerns regarding use of ECGs as a part of the PPE...
February 21, 2017: Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28177138/application-of-pediatric-appropriate-use-criteria-for-initial-outpatient-evaluation-of-syncope
#19
MULTICENTER STUDY
Heather M Phelps, Michael S Kelleman, Courtney E McCracken, Oscar J Benavidez, Robert M Campbell, Pamela S Douglas, Benjamin W Eidem, Wyman W Lai, Leo Lopez, Kenan W D Stern, Elizabeth Welch, Ritu Sachdeva
BACKGROUND: Syncope is a common reason for outpatient transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). We studied the applicability of pediatric appropriate use criteria (AUC) on initial outpatient evaluation of children (≤18 years) with syncope. METHODS: Data were obtained before (Phase I, April-September 2014) and after (Phase II, January-April 2015) the release of the AUC document from six participating pediatric cardiology centers. Site investigators determined the indication for TTE and assigned appropriateness rating based on the AUC document: Appropriate (A), May Be Appropriate (M), Rarely Appropriate (R), or "unclassifiable" (U) if it did not fit any scenario in the AUC document...
March 2017: Echocardiography
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28146440/sudden-collapse-of-a-preschool-aged-child-on-the-playground
#20
RoseAnn L Scheller, Laurie H Johnson, Michelle C Caruso, Angela Lorts
PURPOSE: Primary cardiac events are rare in children. There is little information in the literature regarding the most appropriate emergency department (ED) management of this type of pediatric patient, especially with regard to medication use. SUMMARY: This case highlights the pediatric ED evaluation and treatment of sudden collapse in a child with an ultimate diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Cardiac disorders represent 2% to 6% of cases of pediatric syncope presenting to EDs, particularly if there are previous prodromal symptoms and/or a history of exertion...
February 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
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