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Health disparity

Xiaolei Song, Guanyang Zou, Wen Chen, Siqi Han, Xia Zou, Li Ling
OBJECTIVE: To describe the self-reported health status and service utilization of employed, retired and unemployed migrants in Guangzhou, a mega-city in southern China. METHODS: Cross-sectional study adapted from National Health Service Survey between September and December in 2014. Based on the distribution of occupation of migrants, multi-stage sampling was used to recruit individuals. Logistic regression was applied to explore the factors influencing their service utilization...
October 24, 2016: Tropical Medicine & International Health: TM & IH
Kerry Ard, Cynthia Colen, Marisol Becerra, Thelma Velez
This study provides an empirical test of two mechanisms (social capital and exposure to air pollution) that are theorized to mediate the effect of neighborhood on health and contribute to racial disparities in health outcomes. To this end, we utilize the Social Capital Benchmark Study, a national survey of individuals nested within communities in the United States, to estimate how multiple dimensions of social capital and exposure to air pollution, explain racial disparities in self-rated health. Our main findings show that when controlling for individual-confounders, and nesting within communities, our indicator of cognitive bridging, generalized trust, decreases the gap in self-rated health between African Americans and Whites by 84%, and the gap between Hispanics and Whites by 54%...
October 19, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Oscar Patterson-Lomba, Muntaser Safan, Sherry Towers, Jay Taylor
Urban areas, with large and dense populations, offer conditions that favor the emergence and spread of certain infectious diseases. One common feature of urban populations is the existence of large socioeconomic inequalities which are often mirrored by disparities in access to healthcare. Recent empirical evidence suggests that higher levels of socioeconomic inequalities are associated with worsened public health outcomes, including higher rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STD's) and lower life expectancy...
October 1, 2016: Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering: MBE
Sungwoo Lim, Valerie Meausoone, Christina Norman, Carol Quinlan, Cynthia R Driver
OBJECTIVE: Neighborhood-level factors such as ethnic densities and social cohesion have been negatively associated with psychological distress among Latino Americans. Yet, existing evidence is based on either specific neighborhood factors or particular Latino subgroups. The objective of the study was to assess difference in psychological distress between each of four Latino subgroups (Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Mexicans, other Latinos) and non-Latino white adults in New York City, and quantify total neighborhood-level influence on these differences...
October 24, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Julia S Seay, Morgan Mandigo, Jonathan Kish, Janelle Menard, Sarah Marsh, Erin Kobetz
OBJECTIVE: Haitian women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer within the Western hemisphere. Intravaginal hygiene practices have been linked with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and cervical dysplasia. These practices, known as 'twalet deba' in Haitian Creole, are common among Haitian women and are performed with various natural and synthetic agents. As part of a community-based participatory research initiative aimed at reducing cervical cancer disparities in rural Haiti, we explored the use of intravaginal agents and their associations with high-risk HPV infection...
October 24, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
K J Coppell, J C Miller, A R Gray, M Schultz, J I Mann, W R Parnell
OBJECTIVE: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined as excessive fat accumulation in hepatocytes when no other pathologic causes are present, is an increasingly common obesity-related disorder. We sought to describe the prevalence of elevated liver enzymes, a marker of liver damage, among New Zealand adults, and high-risk subgroups including those with an elevated body mass index and those with pre-diabetes or diabetes, to gain a better understanding of the burden of liver disease...
December 2015: Obesity Science & Practice
Sarah Y Nowlin, Charles M Cleland, Maya Vadiveloo, Gail D'Eramo Melkus, Niyati Parekh, Holly Hagan
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to examine sociodemographic and health behavior factors associated with dietary intake as measured by the healthy eating index (HEI-2010) for persons with and without diabetes (T2D). DESIGN: A secondary data analysis of three NHANES data cycles spanning 2007-2012. Multiple linear regression assessed racial/ethnic differences in HEI-2010 scores in those without T2D, with T2D, and with undiagnosed T2D. PARTICIPANTS: The sample included non-pregnant adults aged ≥20 years who had two days of reliable dietary recall data...
October 20, 2016: Ethnicity & Disease
Irena Stepanikova, Gabriela R Oates
OBJECTIVE: Perceived discrimination is an important risk factor for minority health. Drawing from the scholarship on multidimensionality of race, this study examines the relationships between perceived discrimination in health care and two dimensions of racial identity: self-identified race/ethnicity and perceived attributed race/ethnicity (respondents' perceptions of how they are racially classified by others). METHODS: We used Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data collected in 2004-2013 and we specifically examined the data on perceived racial discrimination in health care during the past 12 months, perceived attributed race/ethnicity, and self-identified race/ethnicity...
October 20, 2016: Ethnicity & Disease
Nathalie Goutté, Philippe Sogni, Noelle Bendersky, Jean Claude Barbare, Bruno Falissard, Olivier Farges
BACKGROUND: Information on the incidence, management, and prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is derived from population samples, regional data, or registries. Comprehensive national evaluations within a given country are lacking. METHODS: This observational study analysed data from French administrative databases for more than 30,000 patients with HCC diagnosed between 2009 and 2012, followed up to 2013. The incidence of HCC, access to surgery, and survival, at both the national level and two geographical levels (the 21 French regions and 95 French departments into which France is divided administratively), were determined...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Hepatology
Laura A Cooley, Brooke Hoots, Cyprian Wejnert, Rashunda Lewis, Gabriela Paz-Bailey
Recent policy changes have improved the ability of gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) to secure health insurance. We wanted to assess changes over time in self-reported health insurance status among MSM participating in CDC's National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) in 2008, 2011, and 2014. We analyzed NHBS data from sexually active MSM interviewed at venues in 20 U.S. cities. To determine if interview year was associated with health insurance status, we used a Poisson model with robust standard errors...
October 22, 2016: AIDS and Behavior
Amanda Reichard, Michelle Stransky, Kimberly Phillips, Monica McClain, Charles Drum
BACKGROUND: While it is commonly accepted that disparities in unmet need for care vary by age, race/ethnicity, income, education, and access to care, literature documenting unmet needs experienced by adults with different types of disabilities is developing. OBJECTIVE: The main objective was to determine whether subgroups of people with disabilities are more likely than people without disabilities to delay/forgo necessary care, in general and among the insured. METHODS: We used pooled Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data (2004-2010) to examine delaying or forgoing medical, dental, and pharmacy care among five disability subgroups (physical, cognitive, visual, hearing, multiple) and the non-disabled population...
September 13, 2016: Disability and Health Journal
Zaid Al-Qurayshi, Adam Hauch, Sudesh Srivastav, Emad Kandil
BACKGROUND: Successful parathyroidectomy requires advanced surgeon experience. We aim to examine population characteristics at risk of being managed by low-volume surgeons. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, 2004 to 2009. The study population included adult inpatients who underwent parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism. RESULTS: A total of 3,503 discharge records were included...
August 4, 2016: American Journal of Surgery
M A Beydoun, H A Beydoun, N Mode, G A Dore, J A Canas, S M Eid, A B Zonderman
BACKGROUND: Studies uncovering factors beyond socio-economic status (SES) that would explain racial and ethnic disparities in mortality are scarce. METHODS: Using prospective cohort data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), we examined all-cause and cause-specific mortality disparities by race, mediation through key factors and moderation by age (20-49 vs. 50+), sex and poverty status. Cox proportional hazards, discrete-time hazards and competing risk regression models were conducted (N = 16,573 participants, n = 4207 deaths, Median time = 170 months (1-217 months))...
October 22, 2016: BMC Public Health
Mariel S Bello, Raina D Pang, Gregory S Chasson, Lara A Ray, Adam M Leventhal
The association between obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptomatology and smoking is poorly understood, particularly in African Americans-a group subject to smoking- and OC-related health disparities. In a non-clinical sample of 253 African American smokers, we tested the negative reinforcement model of OC-smoking comorbidity, purporting that smokers with higher OC symptoms experience greater negative affect (NA) and urge to smoke for NA suppression upon acute tobacco abstinence. Following a baseline visit involving OC assessment, participants completed two counterbalanced experimental visits (non-abstinent vs...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Anxiety Disorders
Charlotte Woodhead, Ruth Cunningham, Mark Ashworth, Elizabeth Barley, Robert J Stewart, Max J Henderson
BACKGROUND: Breast and cancer screening uptake has been found to be lower among women with serious mental illness (SMI). This study aims to corroborate these findings in the UK and to identify variation in screening uptake by illness/treatment factors, and primary care consultation frequency. METHODS: Linked population-based primary and secondary care data from the London borough of Lambeth (UK) were used to compare breast and cervical screening receipt among linked eligible SMI patients (n = 625 and n = 1393), to those without SMI known only to primary care (n = 106,554 and n = 25,385) using logistic regression models adjusted first for socio-demographic factors and second, additionally for primary care consultation frequency...
October 21, 2016: BMC Cancer
Samuele Zilioli, Ledina Imami, Richard B Slatcher
Social class is a robust predictor of health, with risk for disease and mortality increasing towards the lower end of the socioeconomic (SES) spectrum. While certain psychological characteristics, such as high sense of control, can protect low-SES individuals from adverse health outcomes, very few studies have investigated the biological mechanisms underlying these relationships. In this study, we tested whether sense of control mitigated the associations between SES and cortisol activity, and SES and physical health in daily life (i...
October 6, 2016: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Stephanie H Cook, Robert-Paul Juster, Benjamin J Calebs, Justin Heinze, Alison L Miller
Much of the extant scientific research examining hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis functioning is conducted among White heterosexuals. Very little research examines HPA-axis functioning between different minority groups. Individuals who identify as both sexual and racial minorities may experience increased stigma and discrimination that can affect HPA-axis functioning. In the current study, we examined diurnal cortisol rhythm in young White gay men (WGM) compared to young Black gay men (BGM). The sample consisted of 70 healthy gay men (mean [SD] age=22...
October 13, 2016: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Soraya P A Verstraeten, Hans A M van Oers, Johan P Mackenbach
Decolonization has brought political independence to half the Caribbean states in the last half of the 20th century, while the other states remain affiliated. Previous studies suggested a beneficial impact of affiliated status on population health, which may be mediated by more favorable economic development. We assessed how disparities in life expectancy between currently sovereign and affiliated states developed over time, whether decolonization coincided with changes in life expectancy, and whether decolonization coincided with similar changes in GDP per capita...
September 28, 2016: Social Science & Medicine
Rui Wang, Yan Dong, Jia Weng, Emily Z Kontos, Ronald D Chervin, Carol L Rosen, Carole L Marcus, Susan Redline
RATIONALE: Prior research found that individual-level environmental and social indicators did not explain the racial disparity in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Neighborhood socioeconomic variables, risk factors for a range of adverse behavioral and health outcomes, may better explain this racial disparity and help identify modifiable intervention targets. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the associations of neighborhood socioeconomic variables with obstructive sleep apnea severity and to assess whether the neighborhood variables explain the association between race and obstructive sleep apnea severity...
October 21, 2016: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
Maria Kosma, David Buchanan, Jan M Hondzinski
Despite the exercise benefits, disparities among diverse older adults continue to exist where African American women have the lowest percentage of any population group in meeting national recommended activity guidelines. Drawing on the philosophical tradition of phronesis (practical reasoning) introduced by Aristotle, we studied perceptions of the exercise value among 14 older African American women. Three themes included: 1) exercise goals (e.g., effort exerted), 2) exercise reasons (e.g., health benefits, enjoyment and convenience, and activity recommendation), and 3) inactivity reasons (e...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
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