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population genetics

R Khukhunaishvili, S Tskvitinidze, M Koridze, M Nagervadze, N Chelidze
The ability to sense phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) bitterness represents a well-known and convenient genetic marker for human populations and biomedical studies. Two basic phenotypes can be dichotomized by PTC sensitivity: PTC-sensitive or "tester" and PTC-insensitive or "non-tester". The majority of the population (approximately 70%) belong to the PTC-sensitive phenotype, while the remaining 30% are PTC-insensitive. The distribution of PTC sensitivities varies by consumption of alcohol, bitter coffee and cigarettes...
September 2016: Georgian Medical News
N Kantaria, I Pantsulaia, I Andronikashvili, G Simonia
It has been known that salt-sensitivity of blood pressure is defined genetically as well as can be developed secondary to either decreased renal function or by influence of other environmental factors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possible mechanism for the development of salt-sensitive essential hypertension in the population of Georgia. The Case-Control study included 185 subjects, 94 cases with Essential Hypertension stage I (JNC7) without prior antihypertensive treatment, and 91 controls. Salt-sensitivity test was used to divide both case and control groups into salt-sensitive (n=112) and salt-resistant (n=73) subgroups...
September 2016: Georgian Medical News
Shanna Cheng, Elton Li, Anna S Lok
Despite guidelines recommending hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening among the Asian population, not all Asians are screened. We assessed barriers to and factors predicting HBV screening in Michigan. Adults residing in Southeast Michigan self-identifying as Asian were surveyed at Asian grocery stores, restaurants, churches, and community events. 404 persons participated in the survey, 54 % were women, median age was 51 years, 63 % were Chinese, and 93.8 % were born outside the U.S. 181 (44.8 %) had not or could not recall having been screened for HBV...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Community Health
Miriam Krischke, Georg Hempel, Swantje Völler, Nicolas André, Maurizio D'Incalci, Gianni Bisogno, Wolfgang Köpcke, Matthias Borowski, Ralf Herold, Alan V Boddy, Joachim Boos
PURPOSE: Doxorubicin is a key component in many pediatric oncology treatment regimens; still pharmacology data on which current dosing regimens are based are very limited. METHODS: We conducted a multinational pharmacokinetic study investigating age dependency of doxorubicin metabolism and elimination in children with cancer. One hundred and one patients treated with doxorubicin according to a cancer-specific national or European therapeutic trial were recruited...
October 21, 2016: Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology
Danielle Aberdein, John S Munday, Barbara Gandolfi, Keren E Dittmer, Richard Malik, Dorian J Garrick, Leslie A Lyons
British shorthair (BSH) kittens in multiple litters died as a result of a severe non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative disease that showed many similarities with human autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Human ALPS is caused by inherited defects in FAS-mediated lymphocyte apoptosis and the possibility of similar defects was investigated in BSH cats. The whole genomes of two affected kittens were sequenced and compared to 82 existing cat genomes. Both BSH kittens had homozygous insertions of an adenine within exon 3 of the FAS-ligand gene...
October 21, 2016: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
Marion I Boldingh, Angelina H Maniaol, Cathrine Brunborg, Harald Weedon-Fekjær, Jan J G M Verschuuren, Chantal M E Tallaksen
OBJECTIVE: To study the risk of clinical onset of myasthenia gravis (MG) in pregnancy and during the first 6 months postpartum because an association between pregnancy or the postpartum period and the onset of autoimmune MG is widely assumed but not proven. METHODS: The design was a cross-sectional population-based cohort study of 2 MG cohorts (Norway and the Netherlands) with 1,038 healthy controls from Norway. Data were obtained on 246 women with MG (age at onset 15-45 years)...
October 21, 2016: Neurology
Jong Wha J Joo, Eun Yong Kang, Elin Org, Nick Furlotte, Brian Parks, Farhad Hormozdiari, Aldons J Lusis, Eleazar Eskin
A typical GWAS tests correlation between a single phenotype and each genotype one at a time. However, single phenotype analysis might miss unmeasured aspects of complex biological networks. Analyzing many phenotypes simultaneously may increase the power to capture these unmeasured aspects and detect more variants. Several multivariate approaches aim to detect variants related to more than one phenotype, but these current approaches do not consider the effects of population structure. As a result, these approaches may result in a significant amount of false positive identifications...
October 21, 2016: Genetics
Alexandra Asaro, Gregory Ziegler, Cathrine Ziyomo, Owen Hoekenga, Brian Dilkes, Ivan Baxter
Plants obtain soil-resident elements that support growth and metabolism from the water- flow facilitated by transpiration and active transport processes. The availability of elements in the environment interacts with the genetic capacity of organisms to modulate element uptake through plastic adaptive responses, such as homeostasis. These interactions should cause the elemental contents of plants to vary such that the effects of genetic polymorphisms will be dramatically dependent on the environment in which the plant is grown...
October 21, 2016: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
Isaac Garrido-Benavent, Sergio Pérez-Ortega, Asunción de Los Ríos
Symbiotic associations between green algae (Chlorophyta) and fungi give rise to morphologically and eco-physiologically distinct entities, or so-called, lichens. In one of the most peculiar of these associations, the partners are species of the macroscopic genus Prasiola (Trebouxiophyceae) and the ascomycete Mastodia tessellata (Verrucariaceae). This is the only known case of a lichen symbiosis involving a foliose green alga. Despite intense research targeted at understanding the biology of this particular association, little is known about the genetic variability of its symbionts...
October 18, 2016: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Pengfei Fan, Yang Liu, Zhechun Zhang, Chao Zhao, Cheng Li, Wulin Liu, Zhijin Liu, Ming Li
The white-cheeked macaque Macaca leucogenys is a recently described species that was only diagnosed based on photos, without any specimen measurements or molecular genetic diagnosis. Using extracted DNA from four newly collected skin specimens, we studied the genetic diversity and phylogenetic position of M. leucogenys using multilocus sequence data, including mitochondrial and Y chromosomal genes. Skin measurements of four individuals showed that the white-cheeked macaque is robust and larger than M. assamensis but is similar in body size to M...
October 18, 2016: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
V Rougeron, T De Meeûs, A-L Bañuls
One key process of the life cycle of pathogens is their mode of reproduction. Indeed, this fundamental biological process conditions the multiplication and the transmission of genes and thus the propagation of diseases in the environment. Reproductive strategies of protozoan parasites have been a subject of debate for many years, principally due to the difficulty in making direct observations of sexual reproduction (i.e. genetic recombination). Traditionally, these parasites were considered as characterized by a preeminent clonal structure...
October 18, 2016: Infection, Genetics and Evolution
L Baila-Rueda, A Cenarro, I Lamiquiz-Moneo, R Mateo-Gallego, A M Bea-Sanz, S Perez-Calahorra, V Marco-Benedi, F Civeira
Some oxysterols are precursors of bile acid synthesis and play an important role in cholesterol homeostasis. However, if they are involved in the pathogeny of genetic hypercholesterolemia has not been previously explored. We have studied non-cholesterol sterol markers of cholesterol synthesis (lanosterol and desmosterol) and oxysterols (7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one, 24S-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol) in 200 affected subjects with primary hypercholesterolemia of genetic origin, negative for mutations in LDLR, APOB, PCSK9 and APOE genes (non-FH GH) and 100 normolipemic controls...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
A-Mei Zhang, Cheng-Lin Zhang, Yuzhu Song, Ping Zhao, Yue Feng, Binghui Wang, Zheng Li, Li Liu, Xueshan Xia
OBJECTIVES: About 2% of the world population infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV), which was one of the main reasons for hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Recently, NPC1L1 was identified to be an important factor for HCV entry into host cells. Whether genetic variations of the NPC1L1 gene were associated with HCV-infection was unknown. METHODS: In this study, we analyzed five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NPC1L1 gene in 261 HCV-infected individuals and 265 general controls from Yunnan Province, China...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Infectious Diseases: IJID
Pei-Jung Lin, Wei-Shi Yeh, Peter J Neumann
OBJECTIVES: The current US mandatory newborn screening panel does not include spinal muscular atrophy, the most common fatal genetic disease among children. We assessed population preferences for newborn screening for spinal muscular atrophy, and how test preferences varied depending on immediate treatment implications. METHODS: We conducted an online willingness-to-pay survey of US adults (n = 982). Respondents were asked to imagine being parents of a newborn...
September 15, 2016: Pediatric Neurology
Danilo Solano, Juan Carlos Navarro, Antonio León-Reyes, Washington Benítez-Ortiz, Richar Rodríguez-Hidalgo
Tapeworms Taenia solium and Taenia saginata are the causative agents of taeniasis/cysticercosis. These are diseases with high medical and veterinary importance due to their impact on public health and rural economy in tropical countries. The re-emergence of T. solium as a result of human migration, the economic burden affecting livestock industry, and the large variability of symptoms in several human cysticercosis, encourage studies on genetic diversity, and the identification of these parasites with molecular phylogenetic tools...
October 18, 2016: Experimental Parasitology
Ethan A Winkler, John K Yue, Adam R Ferguson, Nancy R Temkin, Murray B Stein, Jason Barber, Esther L Yuh, Sourabh Sharma, Gabriela G Satris, Thomas W McAllister, Jonathan Rosand, Marco D Sorani, Hester F Lingsma, Phiroz E Tarapore, Esteban G Burchard, Donglei Hu, Celeste Eng, Kevin K W Wang, Pratik Mukherjee, David O Okonkwo, Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, Geoffrey T Manley
Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) results in variable clinical trajectories and outcomes. The source of variability remains unclear, but may involve genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A SNP in catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) is suggested to influence development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but its role in TBI remains unclear. Here, we utilize the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot (TRACK-TBI Pilot) study to investigate whether the COMT Val(158)Met polymorphism is associated with PTSD and global functional outcome as measured by the PTSD Checklist - Civilian Version and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE), respectively...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Khursheed Ahmad, Ved P Kumar, Bheem Dutt Joshi, Mohamed Raza, Parag Nigam, Anzara Anjum Khan, Surendra P Goyal
BACKGROUND: The Tibetan antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii), or chiru, is an endangered antelope, distributed in China [Xinjiang, Xizang, Qinghai, Zhuolaihu Lake (Breeding habitat)], and India (Aksai Chin and Ladakh). There is a global demand for the species prized wool, which is used in weaving shahtoosh shawls. Over the years, the population of the Tibetan antelope has drastically declined from more than a million to a few thousand individuals, mainly due to poaching. Field studies undertaken in Ladakh, India also indicated winter migration of the population to Tibet...
October 21, 2016: BMC Research Notes
Diyendo Massilani, Silvia Guimaraes, Jean-Philip Brugal, E Andrew Bennett, Malgorzata Tokarska, Rose-Marie Arbogast, Gennady Baryshnikov, Gennady Boeskorov, Jean-Christophe Castel, Sergey Davydov, Stéphane Madelaine, Olivier Putelat, Natalia N Spasskaya, Hans-Peter Uerpmann, Thierry Grange, Eva-Maria Geigl
BACKGROUND: Climatic and environmental fluctuations as well as anthropogenic pressure have led to the extinction of much of Europe's megafauna. The European bison or wisent (Bison bonasus), one of the last wild European large mammals, narrowly escaped extinction at the onset of the 20th century owing to hunting and habitat fragmentation. Little is known, however, about its origin, evolutionary history and population dynamics during the Pleistocene. RESULTS: Through ancient DNA analysis we show that the emblematic European bison has experienced several waves of population expansion, contraction, and extinction during the last 50,000 years in Europe, culminating in a major reduction of genetic diversity during the Holocene...
October 21, 2016: BMC Biology
Sittiporn Pattaradilokrat, Vorthon Sawaswong, Phumin Simpalipan, Morakot Kaewthamasorn, Napaporn Siripoon, Pongchai Harnyuttanakorn
BACKGROUND: An effective malaria vaccine is an urgently needed tool to fight against human malaria, the most deadly parasitic disease of humans. One promising candidate is the merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) of Plasmodium falciparum. This antigenic protein, encoded by the merozoite surface protein (msp-3) gene, is polymorphic and classified according to size into the two allelic types of K1 and 3D7. A recent study revealed that both the K1 and 3D7 alleles co-circulated within P. falciparum populations in Thailand, but the extent of the sequence diversity and variation within each allelic type remains largely unknown...
October 21, 2016: Malaria Journal
Yanping Wang, Jin Li, Thomas F Kolon, Alicia Olivant Fisher, T Ernesto Figueroa, Ahmad H BaniHani, Jennifer A Hagerty, Ricardo Gonzalez, Paul H Noh, Rosetta M Chiavacci, Kisha R Harden, Debra J Abrams, Deborah Stabley, Cecilia E Kim, Katia Sol-Church, Hakon Hakonarson, Marcella Devoto, Julia Spencer Barthold
BACKGROUND: Copy number variation (CNV) is a potential contributing factor to many genetic diseases. Here we investigated the potential association of CNV with nonsyndromic cryptorchidism, the most common male congenital genitourinary defect, in a Caucasian population. METHODS: Genome wide genotyping were performed in 559 cases and 1772 controls (Group 1) using Illumina HumanHap550 v1, HumanHap550 v3 or Human610-Quad platforms and in 353 cases and 1149 controls (Group 2) using the Illumina Human OmniExpress 12v1 or Human OmniExpress 12v1-1...
October 21, 2016: BMC Urology
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