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sudden unexpected infant death

Neal Goldberg, Yahdira Rodriguez-Prado, Rebecca Tillery, Caroline Chua
Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden unexpected death of an apparently healthy infant younger than age 12 months whose cause of death remains unknown despite a thorough death scene investigation, a review of the clinical history, and an autopsy. Despite the huge achievement of the Back to Sleep program, SIDS remains one of the leading causes of infant death in the United States. In recent years, the SIDS rate has remained stationary despite major public health efforts aimed at high-risk groups to improve sleep environment and strategies...
March 1, 2018: Pediatric Annals
Andrea Silva, Maria João Baptista, Emanuel Araújo
Congenital coronary artery anomalies are modifications of their origin, course or structure and its incidence varies between 0,2 and 5,6% of the general population. Although the majority is asymptomatic, they are the second leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young athletes. The aim of this study is to highlight the main anomalies with hemodynamic significance, including the anomalous origin of a coronary artery from the opposite sinus and anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from pulmonary artery...
February 26, 2018: Portuguese Journal of Cardiology: An Official Journal of the Portuguese Society of Cardiology
Deborah Stiffler, Brook Ayres, Cheyenne Fauvergue, Deborah Cullen
PURPOSE: A Black infant dies every 13 hours in the state of Indiana. The overall infant mortality rate in 2013 was 7.2 deaths per 1000 live births, but for Black infants, the rate was 15.3 deaths per 1000 live births. For over 20 years, placing an infant to sleep on his back has decreased the death rate from sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), but many Black families continue to advocate bed sharing, prone sleeping, and inappropriate bedding/sleep surfaces, predisposing an infant to a significantly higher risk for SUID/SIDS...
February 25, 2018: Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing: JSPN
Natalie Ambrose, Karen A Waters, Michael L Rodriguez, Kendall Bailey, Rita Machaalani
The purpose of this study was to examine the neuronal expression of apoptotic markers in the rostral medulla of a newly characterized dataset of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI), and to determine the impact of diagnostic groupings on these findings and whether they pertain to the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Immunohistochemical staining was quantified to determine the percentage of neurons positive for active caspase-9 (specific to the intrinsic apoptotic pathway), active caspase-3 (common to the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways) and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) (labels DNA fragmentation) in nine nuclei of the rostral medulla...
February 19, 2018: Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology
Joel L Bass, Tina Gartley, David A Lyczkowski, Ronald Kleinman
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the epidemiology of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) over a 20-year period in the US, to assess the potential frequency of sudden unexpected postnatal collapse in the early days of life, and to determine if SUID rates in the neonatal period (0-27 days) have changed in parallel with rates in the postneonatal periods, including the percentages attributed to codes that include accidental suffocation. STUDY DESIGN: Data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Linked Birth/Infant Death Records for 1995-2014 were analyzed for the first hour, day, week, and month of life...
February 5, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Alexa B Erck Lambert, Sharyn E Parks, Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza
BACKGROUND: Sharp declines in sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) in the 1990s and a diagnostic shift from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) to unknown cause and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed (ASSB) in 1999-2001 have been documented. We examined trends in SUID and SIDS, unknown cause, and ASSB from 1990 to 2015 and compared state-specific SUID rates to identify significant trends that may be used to inform SUID prevention efforts. METHODS: We used data from US mortality files to evaluate national and state-specific SUID rates (deaths per 100 000 live births) for 1990-2015...
February 12, 2018: Pediatrics
Rebecca Carlin, Rachel Y Moon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 12, 2018: Pediatrics
Ann L Wilson, Tyler Hemmingson, Brad Randall
There was a slight decrease in 2016 from 2015 in the total number of live births in South Dakota, but it was the fifth consecutive year that there were more than 12,000 newborns in the state. Nearly one-quarter of South Dakota's births represent minority populations mirroring what is observed nationally. Infant mortality in South Dakota dropped to its lowest ever rate per 1,000 live births (4.8) in 2016. Fewer births of less than 500 g newborns, increased survival of very low birth weight newborns, and a decrease in deaths due to congenital anomalies contributed to this low mortality rate...
January 2018: South Dakota Medicine: the Journal of the South Dakota State Medical Association
Clémence Delteil, David Meyronet, Andre Maues de Paula, Anne Jouvet, Marie-Dominique Piercecchi-Marti
According to the French High Authority for Health, sudden unexpected death in infants (SUDI) is defined as "a sudden death that occurs in an infant, whereas nothing in its known history could have predicted it". This is an exclusion diagnosis. There are great interregional disparities despite the professional recommendations established in February 2007. For the examination of the brain, instructions are not adapted to current and research practice. The role of the pathologist, like anyone involved in SUDI, is to eliminate an abuse head trauma and to determine the cause of death...
February 8, 2018: Annales de Pathologie
Nazeer Muhammad, Muhammad Sharif, Javeria Amin, Riffat Mehboob, Syed Amir Gilani, Nargis Bibi, Hasnain Javed, Naseer Ahmed
Sudden unexpected perinatal collapse is a major trauma for the parents of victims. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is unexpected and mysterious death of an apparently healthy neonate from birth till 1 year of age without any known causes, even after thorough postmortem investigations. However, the incidence of sudden intrauterine unexplained death syndrome (SIUDS) is seven times higher as compared with SIDS. This observation is approximated 40-80%. Stillbirth is defined as death of a fetus after 20th week of gestation or just before delivery at full term without a known reason...
2018: Frontiers in Pediatrics
K Levieux, H Patural, I Harrewijn, E Briand Huchet, B Kugener, O Pidoux, S de Visme, C Adjaoud, C Gras Le Guen, M Hanf
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 29, 2018: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
David Tipene-Leach, Sally A Baddock, Sheila M Williams, Angeline Tangiora, Raymond Jones, Caroline McElnay, Barry J Taylor
AIM: The aim of this study was to identify the potential risks and benefits of sleeping infants in a Pēpi-Pod distributed to families with high risk of sudden unexpected death in infancy compared to a bassinet. METHODS: Forty-five mostly indigenous Māori mothers who were referred by local health providers to receive a Pēpi-Pod were surveyed at recruitment, 1 and 3 months. A sleep study at 1 month included infrared video, oximetry and temperature measures...
January 22, 2018: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
H M Cunningham, H Vally, L Bugeja
Background As the evidence continues to emerge about the relationship between sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) and the way an infant sleeps, providing consistent and evidence-informed recommendations on how best to sleep infants is an ongoing challenge. A recent case series study in the state of Victoria, Australia, identified 45.8% of sleep-related infant deaths occurred whilst bed-sharing. This study prompted the need for further exploration of infant sleeping practices, including bed-sharing, in this population...
January 3, 2018: Maternal and Child Health Journal
Roger W Byard, Fiona Bright, Robert Vink
The prone (face down) sleeping position is known to be associated with a significantly increased risk of sudden and unexpected death in infancy (sudden infant death syndrome or SIDS), however, the reasons for this are unclear. Suggested mechanisms have involved suffocation from occlusion of the external airways by soft bedding/pillows or from flattening of the nose with backward displacement of the tongue, rebreathing of carbon dioxide, blunting of arousal responses with decreased cardiac responses to auditory stimulation, diaphragmatic splinting or fatigue, lowering of vasomotor tone with tachycardia, nasopharyngeal bacterial overgrowth, overheating, alteration of sleep patterns, compromise of cerebral blood flow and upper airway obstruction from distortion of nasal cartilages...
March 2018: Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology
Penina Haber, Pedro L Moro, Carmen Ng, Paige W Lewis, Beth Hibbs, Sarah F Schillie, Noele P Nelson, Rongxia Li, Brock Stewart, Maria V Cano
INTRODUCTION: Currently four recombinant hepatitis B (HepB) vaccines are in use in the United States. HepB vaccines are recommended for infants, children and adults. We assessed adverse events (AEs) following HepB vaccines reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a national spontaneous reporting system. METHODS: We searched VAERS for reports of AEs following single antigen HepB vaccine and HepB-containing vaccines (either given alone or with other vaccines), from January 2005 - December 2015...
December 11, 2017: Vaccine
K J Gold, M C Treadwell, M E Mieras, N T Laventhal
OBJECTIVE: Perinatal loss (stillbirth or early infant death) is often a sudden, unexpected event for families. We evaluated who communicates the loss to the parents and who is there for support at the delivery or death. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a mail survey of 900 bereaved and 500 live-birth mothers to assess emotional, physical and reproductive health outcomes. RESULTS: We had a 44% response rate at 9 months after birth or loss from 377 bereaved mothers and 232 with surviving infants...
December 2017: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
Christine McIntosh, Adrian Trenholme, Joanna Stewart, Alison Vogel
AIM: Sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) rates for Māori and Pacific infants remain higher than for other ethnic groups in New Zealand and bed-sharing is a major risk factor when there is smoking exposure in pregnancy. Sleep space programmes of education and Pēpi-Pod baby beds require evaluation. METHODS: Two hundred and forty Māori and Pacific women and infants were randomised 1:1, to the Pēpi-Pod sleep space programme, or to a control group with 'usual care'...
November 10, 2017: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Kathleen Rice Simpson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: MCN. the American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing
Anna M Lavezzi, Francesco Piscioli, Teresa Pusiol
This report describes a case of sudden collapse of a 20-hour-old newborn, while he was placed close to their mother according to skin-to-skin care, attributed to developmental alterations of brainstem nuclei involved in regulation of the vital functions. The infant, after a normal pregnancy, appeared well developed at birth, with no evidence of malformations or trauma, but showing severe asphyxia. The routine autopsy did not reveal a possible cause of death. Only the in-depth anatomopathological examination of the autonomic nervous system, according to the protocol developed by the "Lino Rossi" Research Center of Milan University, provided an explanation of the pathogenetic mechanism of this early death...
2017: Folia Neuropathologica
Anne Guyot, Fanny Moreau, Maxime Eberhard, Jean-Michel Gaulier, François Paraf
We report the case of a girl of 5 and a half months admitted for discomfort and consciousness loss at home and supported on sudden infant death protocol. Workup was negative. Autopsy showed only signs of asphyxia. Microscopic examination of the pancreas showed hypertrophic beta cells of Langerhans islets, explaining death linked to severe hypoglycemia by inappropriate insulin hypersecretion. This observation highlights the importance of the management of sudden infant unexpected death according to the protocol of the National Health Authority, which includes an autopsy with complete sampling, which in this case resulted in a diagnosis of unknown disease the lifetime of the child...
October 2017: Annales de Pathologie
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