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Cognitive music social training

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28890684/neural-correlates-of-early-sound-encoding-and-their-relationship-to-speech-in-noise-perception
#1
Emily B J Coffey, Alexander M P Chepesiuk, Sibylle C Herholz, Sylvain Baillet, Robert J Zatorre
Speech-in-noise (SIN) perception is a complex cognitive skill that affects social, vocational, and educational activities. Poor SIN ability particularly affects young and elderly populations, yet varies considerably even among healthy young adults with normal hearing. Although SIN skills are known to be influenced by top-down processes that can selectively enhance lower-level sound representations, the complementary role of feed-forward mechanisms and their relationship to musical training is poorly understood...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28736171/northern-elephant-seals-memorize-the-rhythm-and-timbre-of-their-rivals-voices
#2
Nicolas Mathevon, Caroline Casey, Colleen Reichmuth, Isabelle Charrier
The evolutionary origin of rhythm perception, a cognitive ability essential to musicality, remains unresolved [1-5]. The ability to perceive and memorize rhythmic sounds is widely shared among humans [6] but seems rare among other mammals [7, 8]. Although the perception of temporal metrical patterns has been found in a few species, this ability has only been demonstrated through behavioral training [9] (but see [10] for an example of spontaneous tempo coordination in a bonobo), and there is no experimental evidence to indicate its biological function...
August 7, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701205/art-therapy-and-music-reminiscence-activity-in-the-prevention-of-cognitive-decline-study-protocol-for-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#3
Rathi Mahendran, Iris Rawtaer, Johnson Fam, Jonathan Wong, Alan Prem Kumar, Mihir Gandhi, Kenny Xu Jing, Lei Feng, Ee Heok Kua
BACKGROUND: Attention has shifted to the use of non-pharmacological interventions to prevent cognitive decline as a preventive strategy, as well as for those at risk and those with mild cognitive impairment. Early introduction of psycho-social interventions can address cognitive decline and significantly impact quality of life and the wellbeing of elderly individuals. This pilot study explores the feasibility of using art therapy and music reminiscence activity to improve the cognition of community living elderly with mild cognitive impairment...
July 12, 2017: Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577267/cognitive-training-in-alzheimer-s-disease-a-controlled-randomized-study
#4
A R Giovagnoli, V Manfredi, A Parente, L Schifano, S Oliveri, G Avanzini
This controlled randomized single-blind study evaluated the effects of cognitive training (CT), compared to active music therapy (AMT) and neuroeducation (NE), on initiative in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Secondarily, we explored the effects of CT on episodic memory, mood, and social relationships. Thirty-nine AD patients were randomly assigned to CT, AMT, or NE. Each treatment lasted 3 months. Before, at the end, and 3 months after treatment, neuropsychological tests and self-rated scales assessed initiative, episodic memory, depression, anxiety, and social relationships...
August 2017: Neurological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28418586/simulated-presence-therapy-for-dementia
#5
REVIEW
Iosief Abraha, Joseph M Rimland, Isabel Lozano-Montoya, Giuseppina Dell'Aquila, Manuel Vélez-Díaz-Pallarés, Fabiana M Trotta, Alfonso J Cruz-Jentoft, Antonio Cherubini
BACKGROUND: Dementia is a common and serious neuropsychiatric syndrome, characterised by progressive cognitive and functional decline. The majority of people with dementia develop behavioural disturbances, also known as behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Several non-pharmacological interventions have been evaluated to treat BPSD in people with dementia. Simulated presence therapy (SPT), an intervention that uses video or audiotape recordings of family members played to the person with dementia, is a possible approach to treat BPSD...
April 18, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167396/musical-friends-and-foes-the-social-cognition-of-affiliation-and-control-in-improvised-interactions
#6
Jean-Julien Aucouturier, Clément Canonne
A recently emerging view in music cognition holds that music is not only social and participatory in its production, but also in its perception, i.e. that music is in fact perceived as the sonic trace of social relations between a group of real or virtual agents. While this view appears compatible with a number of intriguing music cognitive phenomena, such as the links between beat entrainment and prosocial behaviour or between strong musical emotions and empathy, direct evidence is lacking that listeners are at all able to use the acoustic features of a musical interaction to infer the affiliatory or controlling nature of an underlying social intention...
April 2017: Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28103638/music-interventions-for-acquired-brain-injury
#7
REVIEW
Wendy L Magee, Imogen Clark, Jeanette Tamplin, Joke Bradt
BACKGROUND: Acquired brain injury (ABI) can result in impairments in motor function, language, cognition, and sensory processing, and in emotional disturbances, which can severely reduce a survivor's quality of life. Music interventions have been used in rehabilitation to stimulate brain functions involved in movement, cognition, speech, emotions, and sensory perceptions. An update of the systematic review published in 2010 was needed to gauge the efficacy of music interventions in rehabilitation for people with ABI...
January 20, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28009676/effectiveness-of-meaningful-occupation-interventions-for-people-living-with-dementia-in-residential-aged-care-a-systematic-review
#8
Catherine Travers, Deborah Brooks, Sonia Hines, Maria O'Reilly, Mitchell McMaster, Wei He, Margaret MacAndrew, Elaine Fielding, Lina Karlsson, Elizabeth Beattie
BACKGROUND: The ability to participate in valued activities, whether for work, leisure or family, is an important aspect of personal identity. In dementia, progressive memory loss means that abilities developed over a lifetime begin to be lost as well, contributing to the loss of self and identity. Some studies have reported that activities or interventions tailored to be meaningful to the person with dementia (defined as any activity important to the individual) are more effective in addressing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and improving quality of life (QoL) than those that are not so tailored...
December 2016: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27845490/cognitive-disability-in-alzheimer-s-disease-and-its-management
#9
M Corsi, T Di Raimo, C Di Lorenzo, M Rapp-Ricciardi, T Archer, S Ricci, R Businaro
Cognitive disability linked to neurodegenerative diseases and in particular to Alzheimer's disease, remains an increasing cause for concern through a dramatic prevalence increment and associated socio-economic burdens. Initially Alzheimer's disease develops asymptomatically with primary clinical signs, such as memory impairment, decline of spatial and perceptual abilities, occurring at a later stage. This delay implies the possibility of promoting early interventions during the pre-symptomatic stage of the disease...
September 2016: La Clinica Terapeutica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27819483/the-effects-of-the-music-with-movement-intervention-on-the-cognitive-functions-of-people-with-moderate-dementia-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#10
Daphne Sze Ki Cheung, Claudia Kam Yuk Lai, Frances Kam Yuet Wong, Mason Chin Pang Leung
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the six-week music-with-movement (MM) intervention, as compared with music listening (ML) and social activity (SA), on the cognitive functions of people with moderate dementia over time. METHODS: A multi-center randomized controlled trial was conducted on 165 nursing home residents with moderate dementia. The MM intervention protocol was developed based on a critical literature review, and tested in three rounds of pilot studies before undergoing testing in this study...
November 7, 2016: Aging & Mental Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27817760/a-process-evaluation-of-a-psychomotor-dance-therapy-intervention-dancin-for-behavior-change-in-dementia-attitudes-and-beliefs-of-participating-residents-and-staff
#11
Azucena Guzmán, Lisa Robinson, Lynn Rochester, Ian A James, Julian C Hughes
BACKGROUND: In a previous paper, we presented results from a 12-week study of a Psychomotor DANCe Therapy INtervention (DANCIN) based on Danzón Latin Ballroom that involves motor, emotional-affective, and cognitive domains, using a multiple-baseline single-case design in three care homes. This paper reports the results of a complementary process evaluation to elicit the attitudes and beliefs of home care staff, participating residents, and family members with the aim of refining the content of DANCIN in dementia care...
November 7, 2016: International Psychogeriatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27774079/music-ensemble-as-a-resilient-system-managing-the-unexpected-through-group-interaction
#12
Donald Glowinski, Fabrizio Bracco, Carlo Chiorri, Didier Grandjean
The present contribution provides readers from diverse fields of psychology with a new and comprehensive model for the understanding of the characteristics of music ensembles. The model is based on a novel heuristic approach whose key construct is resilience, intended here as the ability of a system to adapt to external perturbations and anticipate future events. The paper clarifies the specificity of music ensemble as an original social and creative activity, and how some mechanisms, at an individual (cognitive) and group (coordination) level, are enacted in a particular way that endows these groups with exceptional capacity for resilience...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27378982/beat-perception-and-sociability-evidence-from-williams-syndrome
#13
Miriam D Lense, Elisabeth M Dykens
Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27358245/development-of-the-music-therapy-assessment-tool-for-advanced-huntington-s-disease-a-pilot-validation-study
#14
Julian O'Kelly, Rebeka Bodak
BACKGROUND: Case studies of people with Huntington's disease (HD) report that music therapy provides a range of benefits that may improve quality of life; however, no robust music therapy assessment tools exist for this population. OBJECTIVE: Develop and conduct preliminary psychometric testing of a music therapy assessment tool for patients with advanced HD. METHODS: First, we established content and face validity of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Advanced HD (MATA-HD) through focus groups and field testing...
2016: Journal of Music Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27284021/neurobiology-of-everyday-communication-what-have-we-learned-from-music
#15
Nina Kraus, Travis White-Schwoch
Sound is an invisible but powerful force that is central to everyday life. Studies in the neurobiology of everyday communication seek to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying sound processing, their stability, their plasticity, and their links to language abilities and disabilities. This sound processing lies at the nexus of cognitive, sensorimotor, and reward networks. Music provides a powerful experimental model to understand these biological foundations of communication, especially with regard to auditory learning...
June 9, 2016: Neuroscientist: a Review Journal Bringing Neurobiology, Neurology and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26594189/investigating-the-importance-of-self-theories-of-intelligence-and-musicality-for-students-academic-and-musical-achievement
#16
Daniel Müllensiefen, Peter Harrison, Francesco Caprini, Amy Fancourt
Musical abilities and active engagement with music have been shown to be positively associated with many cognitive abilities as well as social skills and academic performance in secondary school students. While there is evidence from intervention studies that musical training can be a cause of these positive relationships, recent findings in the literature have suggested that other factors, such as genetics, family background or personality traits, might also be contributing factors. In addition, there is mounting evidence that self-concepts and beliefs can affect academic performance independently of intellectual ability...
2015: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26161073/cognitive-and-neural-strategies-during-control-of-the-anterior-cingulate-cortex-by-fmri-neurofeedback-in-patients-with-schizophrenia
#17
Julia S Cordes, Krystyna A Mathiak, Miriam Dyck, Eliza M Alawi, Tilman J Gaber, Florian D Zepf, Martin Klasen, Mikhail Zvyagintsev, Ruben C Gur, Klaus Mathiak
Cognitive functioning is impaired in patients with schizophrenia, leading to significant disabilities in everyday functioning. Its improvement is an important treatment target. Neurofeedback (NF) seems a promising method to address the neural dysfunctions underlying those cognitive impairments. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a central hub for cognitive processing, is one of the brain regions known to be dysfunctional in schizophrenia. Here we conducted NF training based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with schizophrenia to enable them to control their ACC activity...
2015: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26102768/7c-02-training-and-environmental-enrichment-to-counteract-cognitive-decline-train-the-brain-effects-on-carotid-structure-and-function
#18
F Stea, R Bruno, L Ghiadoni, F Faita, N Di Lascio, S Del Turco, L Maffei, G Tognoni, S Taddei, E Picano, R Sicari
OBJECTIVE: Physical activity is beneficial to vascular health; on the other hand, vascular damage is associated with cognitive impairment. Both physical activity and a cognitively stimulating environment are known to delay the onset of dementia. The Train The Brain study evaluates the effectiveness of a comprehensive program of physical training and mental activity in delaying cognitive decline in elderly people with mild cognitive impairment, at the same time investigating the relationship between physical, vascular, neurological, and cognitive fitness DESIGN AND METHOD: : Elders age 65-89 were recruited with the help of family physicians and territorial services...
June 2015: Journal of Hypertension
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25975348/mechanism-of-action-for-nonpharmacological-therapies-for-individuals-with-dementia-implications-for-practice-and-research
#19
REVIEW
Sandy C Burgener, Ying-Ling Jao, Joel G Anderson, Ann L Bossen
The current review addresses the need for increased use of evidence-based, nonpharmacological therapies for individuals with dementia. To facilitate understanding of the potential efficacy of nonpharmacological therapies on cognitive functioning for individuals with dementia, the mechanisms of action for selected therapies are described, including the assessment method used to identify the mechanism. The strength of evidence supporting each therapy was evaluated, with some therapies demonstrating strong support and others only moderate support for their effectiveness and mechanism of action...
September 2015: Research in Gerontological Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25249961/an-equal-start-absence-of-group-differences-in-cognitive-social-and-neural-measures-prior-to-music-or-sports-training-in-children
#20
Assal Habibi, Beatriz Ilari, Kevin Crimi, Michael Metke, Jonas T Kaplan, Anand A Joshi, Richard M Leahy, David W Shattuck, So Y Choi, Justin P Haldar, Bronte Ficek, Antonio Damasio, Hanna Damasio
Several studies comparing adult musicians and non-musicians have provided compelling evidence for functional and anatomical differences in the brain systems engaged by musical training. It is not known, however, whether those differences result from long-term musical training or from pre-existing traits favoring musicality. In an attempt to begin addressing this question, we have launched a longitudinal investigation of the effects of childhood music training on cognitive, social and neural development. We compared a group of 6- to 7-year old children at the start of intense after-school musical training, with two groups of children: one involved in high intensity sports training but not musical training, another not involved in any systematic training...
2014: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
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