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Cognitive music social training

Miriam D Lense, Elisabeth M Dykens
Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Julian O'Kelly, Rebeka Bodak
BACKGROUND: Case studies of people with Huntington's disease (HD) report that music therapy provides a range of benefits that may improve quality of life; however, no robust music therapy assessment tools exist for this population. OBJECTIVE: Develop and conduct preliminary psychometric testing of a music therapy assessment tool for patients with advanced HD. METHODS: First, we established content and face validity of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Advanced HD (MATA-HD) through focus groups and field testing...
2016: Journal of Music Therapy
Nina Kraus, Travis White-Schwoch
Sound is an invisible but powerful force that is central to everyday life. Studies in the neurobiology of everyday communication seek to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying sound processing, their stability, their plasticity, and their links to language abilities and disabilities. This sound processing lies at the nexus of cognitive, sensorimotor, and reward networks. Music provides a powerful experimental model to understand these biological foundations of communication, especially with regard to auditory learning...
June 9, 2016: Neuroscientist: a Review Journal Bringing Neurobiology, Neurology and Psychiatry
Daniel Müllensiefen, Peter Harrison, Francesco Caprini, Amy Fancourt
Musical abilities and active engagement with music have been shown to be positively associated with many cognitive abilities as well as social skills and academic performance in secondary school students. While there is evidence from intervention studies that musical training can be a cause of these positive relationships, recent findings in the literature have suggested that other factors, such as genetics, family background or personality traits, might also be contributing factors. In addition, there is mounting evidence that self-concepts and beliefs can affect academic performance independently of intellectual ability...
2015: Frontiers in Psychology
Julia S Cordes, Krystyna A Mathiak, Miriam Dyck, Eliza M Alawi, Tilman J Gaber, Florian D Zepf, Martin Klasen, Mikhail Zvyagintsev, Ruben C Gur, Klaus Mathiak
Cognitive functioning is impaired in patients with schizophrenia, leading to significant disabilities in everyday functioning. Its improvement is an important treatment target. Neurofeedback (NF) seems a promising method to address the neural dysfunctions underlying those cognitive impairments. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a central hub for cognitive processing, is one of the brain regions known to be dysfunctional in schizophrenia. Here we conducted NF training based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with schizophrenia to enable them to control their ACC activity...
2015: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
F Stea, R Bruno, L Ghiadoni, F Faita, N Di Lascio, S Del Turco, L Maffei, G Tognoni, S Taddei, E Picano, R Sicari
OBJECTIVE: Physical activity is beneficial to vascular health; on the other hand, vascular damage is associated with cognitive impairment. Both physical activity and a cognitively stimulating environment are known to delay the onset of dementia. The Train The Brain study evaluates the effectiveness of a comprehensive program of physical training and mental activity in delaying cognitive decline in elderly people with mild cognitive impairment, at the same time investigating the relationship between physical, vascular, neurological, and cognitive fitness DESIGN AND METHOD: : Elders age 65-89 were recruited with the help of family physicians and territorial services...
June 2015: Journal of Hypertension
Sandy C Burgener, Ying-Ling Jao, Joel G Anderson, Ann L Bossen
The current review addresses the need for increased use of evidence-based, nonpharmacological therapies for individuals with dementia. To facilitate understanding of the potential efficacy of nonpharmacological therapies on cognitive functioning for individuals with dementia, the mechanisms of action for selected therapies are described, including the assessment method used to identify the mechanism. The strength of evidence supporting each therapy was evaluated, with some therapies demonstrating strong support and others only moderate support for their effectiveness and mechanism of action...
September 2015: Research in Gerontological Nursing
Assal Habibi, Beatriz Ilari, Kevin Crimi, Michael Metke, Jonas T Kaplan, Anand A Joshi, Richard M Leahy, David W Shattuck, So Y Choi, Justin P Haldar, Bronte Ficek, Antonio Damasio, Hanna Damasio
Several studies comparing adult musicians and non-musicians have provided compelling evidence for functional and anatomical differences in the brain systems engaged by musical training. It is not known, however, whether those differences result from long-term musical training or from pre-existing traits favoring musicality. In an attempt to begin addressing this question, we have launched a longitudinal investigation of the effects of childhood music training on cognitive, social and neural development. We compared a group of 6- to 7-year old children at the start of intense after-school musical training, with two groups of children: one involved in high intensity sports training but not musical training, another not involved in any systematic training...
2014: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Nina Kraus, Jessica Slater, Elaine C Thompson, Jane Hornickel, Dana L Strait, Trent Nicol, Travis White-Schwoch
Musicians are often reported to have enhanced neurophysiological functions, especially in the auditory system. Musical training is thought to improve nervous system function by focusing attention on meaningful acoustic cues, and these improvements in auditory processing cascade to language and cognitive skills. Correlational studies have reported musician enhancements in a variety of populations across the life span. In light of these reports, educators are considering the potential for co-curricular music programs to provide auditory-cognitive enrichment to children during critical developmental years...
September 3, 2014: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Gill Livingston, Lynsey Kelly, Elanor Lewis-Holmes, Gianluca Baio, Stephen Morris, Nishma Patel, Rumana Z Omar, Cornelius Katona, Claudia Cooper
BACKGROUND: Agitation is common, persistent and distressing in dementia and is linked with care breakdown. Psychotropic medication is often ineffective or harmful, but the evidence regarding non-pharmacological interventions is unclear. OBJECTIVES: We systematically reviewed and synthesised the evidence for clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions for reducing agitation in dementia, considering dementia severity, the setting, the person with whom the intervention is implemented, whether the effects are immediate or longer term, and cost-effectiveness...
June 2014: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
Lutz Goldbeck, Astrid Fidika, Marion Herle, Alexandra L Quittner
BACKGROUND: With increasing survival estimates for individuals with cystic fibrosis, long-term management has become an important focus. Psychological interventions are largely concerned with adherence to treatment, emotional and social adaptation and health-related quality of life. We are unaware of any relevant systematic reviews. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether psychological interventions for people with cystic fibrosis provide significant psychosocial and physical benefits in addition to standard medical care...
2014: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Ewa A Miendlarzewska, Wiebke J Trost
Musical training has recently gained additional interest in education as increasing neuroscientific research demonstrates its positive effects on brain development. Neuroimaging revealed plastic changes in the brains of adult musicians but it is still unclear to what extent they are the product of intensive music training rather than of other factors, such as preexisting biological markers of musicality. In this review, we synthesize a large body of studies demonstrating that benefits of musical training extend beyond the skills it directly aims to train and last well into adulthood...
2013: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Kristi S Multhaup, Scott Denham, Hilton Kelly, Barbara Lom
Neuroscientists have long explored the mechanisms of memory from molecular, physiological, cognitive, and social perspectives. Scholars from other disciplines such as history, sociology, literature, and cultural studies, that do not traditionally cross-pollinate ideas with neuroscientists, also study memory from a variety of angles. In this article, we describe the founding of a multidisciplinary discussion series in which faculty and staff from the arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences come together to explain how memory is integral to their scholarship and teaching...
2011: Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education: JUNE: a Publication of FUN, Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience
A Kurz
Psychosocial interventions improve cognitive abilities (cognitive stimulation, cognitive training), enhance emotional well-being (activity planning, reminiscence), reduce behavioral symptoms (aromatherapy, music therapy) and promote everyday functioning (occupational therapy). Through these effects they reinforce and augment pharmacological treatments for dementia. In addition, psychosocial interventions complement the treatment of patients by supporting family caregivers (educational groups, support programs)...
January 2013: Der Nervenarzt
Danielle Matthews, Tanya Behne, Elena Lieven, Michael Tomasello
Despite its importance in the development of children's skills of social cognition and communication, very little is known about the ontogenetic origins of the pointing gesture. We report a training study in which mothers gave children one month of extra daily experience with pointing as compared with a control group who had extra experience with musical activities. One hundred and two infants of 9, 10, or 11 months of age were seen at the beginning, middle, and end of this one-month period and tested for declarative pointing and gaze following...
November 2012: Developmental Science
Arno K Kumagai
Medical educators have used the visual arts for a variety of instrumental purposes, such as sharpening trainees' skills in observation, description, critical thinking, and communication. The arts have also served as means to more humanistic ends-that is, as a mode of self-care for house officers coping with grief and as a medium for reflecting on the meaning of illness and the nature of doctoring. More generally, art can serve as an expression of identity, as a form of social critique, and as a means to develop a sense of community of shared values...
August 2012: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Lori F Gooding
Three separate studies were conducted in school, residential and after-school care settings to test the effectiveness of a music therapy-based social skills intervention program on improving social competence in children and adolescents. A total of 45 children (n = 12; n = 13; n = 20) aged 6-17 years with social skills deficits participated in a group-based five session intervention program. The same curriculum, adapted to be age appropriate, was used at all 3 sites. Specific deficits within the social skills areas of peer relations and self-management skills were targeted...
2011: Journal of Music Therapy
Jeremy Parr
INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the efficacy of treatments for autism has improved in recent years. In this systematic review the evidence for both drug and non-drug treatments is appraised and clinical guidance is provided for their use. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of early intensive multidisciplinary intervention programmes in children with autism? What are the effects of dietary interventions in children with autism? What are the effects of drug treatments in children with autism? What are the effects of non-drug treatments in children with autism? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review)...
2010: Clinical Evidence
Keith A Wollen
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by dysfunctional intracellular and extracellular biochemical processes that result in neuron death. This article summarizes hypotheses regarding cell dysfunction in AD and discusses the effectiveness of, and problems with, different therapies. Pharmaceutical therapies discussed include cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, antihypertensive drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, secretase inhibitors, insulin resistance drugs, etanercept, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and immunization...
September 2010: Alternative Medicine Review: a Journal of Clinical Therapeutic
David K Conn, Dallas P Seitz
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Psychiatric disorders are common among older adults in long-term care (LTC) homes and the LTC population is rapidly growing in many countries. Treatment of psychiatric conditions in this population is challenging given the psychosocial environment and physical frailty of the population. This review highlights some important advances in pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions in this setting. RECENT FINDINGS: There is some evidence to support the use of psychosocial interventions for behavioral symptoms, including those utilizing sensory interventions such as aromatherapy and calming music; behavioral management techniques; cognitive stimulation; physical activity; and staff training...
November 2010: Current Opinion in Psychiatry
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