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younger onset dementia

F Kazour, C Awaida, L Souaiby, S Richa
INTRODUCTION: Cannabis use is very frequent in bipolar disorder and has been found to increase the duration and frequency of manic symptoms while decreasing those of depression. Bipolar patients who use cannabis were shown to have poorer compliance to treatment, more symptoms that are psychotic and a worse prognosis than patients who do not. In this study, we have evaluated the importance of cannabis use among bipolar patients admitted to the Psychiatric Hospital of the Cross, Lebanon (Hôpital Psychiatrique de la Croix [HPC]) as well as the clinical differences between cannabis users and non-users...
October 10, 2016: L'Encéphale
Roger A Lobo, J H Pickar, J C Stevenson, W J Mack, H N Hodis
In the late 1980s, several observational studies and meta-analyses suggested that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was beneficial for prevention of osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, dementia and decreased all-cause mortality. In 1992, the American College of Physicians recommended HRT for prevention of coronary disease. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, several randomized trials in older women suggested coronary harm and that the risks, including breast cancer, outweighed any benefit. HRT stopped being prescribed at that time, even for women who had severe symptoms of menopause...
October 6, 2016: Atherosclerosis
Tamara Shiner, Anat Mirelman, Mali Gana Weisz, Anat Bar-Shira, Elissa Ash, Ron Cialic, Naomi Nevler, Tanya Gurevich, Noa Bregman, Avi Orr-Urtreger, Nir Giladi
Importance: Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are a risk factor for the development of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). These mutations are common among Ashkenazi Jews (AJ) and appear to have an effect on the natural history of the disease. Objectives: To evaluate the clinical and genetic characteristics of an AJ cohort of patients diagnosed with DLB, assess the association of phenotype of DLB with GBA mutations, and explore the effects of these mutations on the clinical course of the disease...
October 10, 2016: JAMA Neurology
Wendy A Davis, Renate R Zilkens, Sergio E Starkstein, Timothy M E Davis, David G Bruce
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The study aimed to assess the incidence, age of onset, survival and relative hazard of dementia in well-categorised community-based patients with type 2 diabetes compared with a matched cohort of individuals without diabetes. METHODS: A longitudinal observational study was undertaken involving 1291 participants with type 2 diabetes from the Fremantle Diabetes Study and 5159 matched residents without documented diabetes. Linkage with health-related databases was used to detect incident dementia...
October 7, 2016: Diabetologia
Rebecca L Brookes, Matthew J Hollocks, Rhea Y Y Tan, Robin G Morris, Hugh S Markus
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a monogenic form of cerebral small vessel disease leading to early-onset stroke and dementia, with younger patients frequently showing subclinical deficits in cognition. At present, there are no targeted cognitive screening measures for this population. However, the Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) have shown utility in detecting cognitive impairment in sporadic small vessel disease...
October 2016: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Nan Greenwood, Raymond Smith
Dementia is usually diagnosed in later life but can occur in younger people. The experiences of those with older-onset dementia are relatively well understood but little is known about the experiences of those with young-onset dementia (aged less than 65 years). This meta-ethnography therefore synthesised qualitative literature investigating the experiences of people with young-onset dementia (YOD). Six electronic databases were searched and 1155 studies were identified, of which eight fitted the inclusion criteria...
October 2016: Maturitas
David Evans
This study explored the emergence of dementia in people who were still working. A qualitative life course approach was used to describe the experience from the onset of dementia-related symptoms to the time when the person left the workforce. The emergence of dementia at work for the participants in this study took the form of a slow transition that initially was not noticed by co-workers. It brought about subtle changes as the person became forgetful, disorganised, made mistakes and was slower. Over time the person's job performance continued to deteriorate and others at the workplace started to realise that there was a problem...
September 8, 2016: Dementia
J H Spreadbury, C M Kipps
BACKGROUND: Research is beginning to demonstrate the unique psychosocial effects of young onset dementia. Theorising remains at an early stage and there has been little discussion about measurement and methodological issues. Our aim was to conduct a comprehensive literature search of the young onset dementia psychosocial research, and to identify the domains of experience measured with patients and caregivers. METHOD: We conducted a search of five electronic databases (Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase, the Cochrane Library) using equivalent database controlled vocabulary terms...
August 10, 2016: Dementia
Akira Midorikawa, Cristian E Leyton, David Foxe, Ramon Landin-Romero, John R Hodges, Olivier Piguet
BACKGROUND: Anecdotal evidence indicates that some patients with dementia exhibit novel or increased positive behaviors, such as painting or singing, after the disease onset. Due to the lack of objective measures, however, the frequency and nature of these changes has not been formally investigated. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to systematically identify changes in these behaviors in the two most common younger-onset dementia syndromes: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD)...
September 6, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
B Draper, A Withall
Young onset dementia (YOD), where symptoms of dementia have an onset before the age of 65, has become more prominent due to the population increase from the Baby Boomer generation. This clinical perspective examines key issues in the assessment, diagnosis and management of YOD. Challenges in the assessment and diagnosis of YOD are partly due to the diverse range of types of YOD, where degenerative dementias are less common and secondary dementias more common than in late onset dementia. Early symptoms are broad and include depression, behavioural change, neurological disorders, systemic disorders and mild cognitive impairment (MCI)...
July 2016: Internal Medicine Journal
Samrah Ahmed, Ian Baker, Christopher R Butler
Although the risk of developing dementia increases with age, onset can be as early as the third or fourth decade of life. Genetic influences play a more important role in younger than in older people with dementia, so young onset dementia may cluster in families. Diagnosing young onset dementia is challenging. The range of possible presenting features is broad, encompassing behavioural, cognitive, psychiatric and neurological domains, and symptoms are often subtle initially. Frequently the complaints are misattributed to stress or depression, and the patient is falsely reassured that they are too young to have dementia...
May 2016: Practitioner
Dantao Peng, Zhihong Shi, Jun Xu, Lu Shen, Shifu Xiao, Nan Zhang, Yi Li, Jinsong Jiao, Yan-Jiang Wang, Shuai Liu, Meilin Zhang, Meng Wang, Shuling Liu, Yuying Zhou, Xiao Zhang, Xiao-Hua Gu, Ce-Ce Yang, Yu Wang, Bin Jiao, Beisha Tang, Jinhuan Wang, Tao Yu, Yong Ji
Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most frequent cause of dementia. AD diagnosis, progression, and treatment have not been analyzed nationwide in China. The primary aim of this study was to analyze demographic and clinical characteristics related to cognitive decline in AD patients treated at outpatient clinics in China.We performed a retrospective study of 1993 AD patients at 10 cognitive centers across 8 cities in China from March 2011 to October 2014. Of these, 891 patients were followed for more than 1 year...
June 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Chidinma Chima-Melton, Terrence E Murphy, Katy L B Araujo, Margaret A Pisani
BACKGROUND: African-Americans and Hispanics receive disproportionately less aggressive non-critical treatment for chronic diseases than their Caucasian counterparts. However, when it comes to end-of-life care, minority races are purportedly treated more aggressively in Medical Intensive Care Units (MICU) and are more likely to die there. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the impact of race on the intensity of care provided to older adults in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) using the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System-28 (TISS-28) and other MICU interventions...
June 2016: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Frederico Simões do Couto, Nuno Lunet, Sandra Ginó, Catarina Chester, Vanda Freitas, Carolina Maruta, Maria Luísa Figueira, Alexandre de Mendonça
BACKGROUND: Depression has been reported to increase the risk of subsequently developing dementia, but the nature of this relation remains to be elucidated. Depression can be a prodrome/manifestation of dementia or an early risk factor, and the effect may differ according to depression subtypes. Our aim was to study the association between early-onset depression and different depression subtypes, and the later occurrence of dementia. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study including 322 subjects with depression, recruited between 1977 and 1984...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
Caroline Rosenthal Gelman, Kate Rhames
Because of the age of persons diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer's disease or other dementias (YOD), an important and as yet relatively little explored area of YOD, particularly in the United States, is the impact on young children of having a parent with YOD. After reviewing the small but growing research in this area, we report on findings from 12 in-depth interviews with children and well-parents in families with a parent with YOD on the experience and needs of children having a parent with this diagnosis...
May 26, 2016: Dementia
Elles Konijnenberg, Seyed-Mohammad Fereshtehnejad, Mara Ten Kate, Maria Eriksdotter, Philip Scheltens, Peter Johannsen, Gunhild Waldemar, Pieter Jelle Visser
BACKGROUND: Early-onset dementia (EOD) is a rare condition, with an often atypical clinical presentation, and it may therefore be challenging to diagnose. Specialized memory clinics vary in the type of patients seen, diagnostic procedures applied, and the pharmacological treatment given. The aim of this study was to investigate quality-of-care indicators in subjects with EOD from 3 tertiary memory clinics in 3 European countries. METHODS: We included 1325 newly diagnosed EOD patients, ages 65 years or younger, between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2013, from the Danish Dementia Registry (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen), the Swedish Dementia Registry ("SveDem", Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm), and the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (VU University Medical Center)...
May 6, 2016: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders
Angela Richardson, Gillian Pedley, Ferruccio Pelone, Farrukh Akhtar, Jacqueline Chang, Wilson Muleya, Nan Greenwood
BACKGROUND: Dementia in younger people, known as young (YOD) or early onset dementia (EOD), can pose significant challenges. YOD is often diagnosed in those in paid employment who have relatively young children, leading to different challenges to those for older people. It is therefore very important to provide support tailored to their specific needs. This systematic review aimed to synthesize the literature investigating the impact of psychosocial interventions for people with YOD and their family carers...
September 2016: International Psychogeriatrics
Aud Johannessen, Knut Engedal, Kirsten Thorsen
BACKGROUND: It is estimated that one in four persons with young-onset dementia (YOD) (<65 years old) has children younger than 18 years old at the onset of the dementia. These children experience a childhood different from what is expected. Adult children of parents with YOD are seldom addressed in research, and the impact of the dementia on the children's development over time has rarely been studied. AIM: The goal of this study was to explore how adult children experienced the influence of their parents' dementia on their own development during adolescence; what coping efforts, strategies, and resources they employed; and how they evaluated the most recent changes in their life situation...
2016: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being
Jacqueline E Maye, Rebecca A Betensky, Christopher M Gidicsin, Joseph Locascio, J Alex Becker, Lesley Pepin, Jeremy Carmasin, Dorene M Rentz, Gad A Marshall, Deborah Blacker, Reisa A Sperling, Keith A Johnson
Family history (FH) of dementia is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, particularly when the FH is maternal and when the age of dementia onset (AO) is younger. This study tested whether brain amyloid-beta deposition, measured in vivo with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB), was associated with parental dementia and/or younger parental AO. Detailed FH and positron emission tomography (PiB) data were acquired in 147 nondemented aging individuals (mean age 75 ± 8). No participant had both positive maternal and paternal FH...
April 2016: Neurobiology of Aging
Ettore Beghi
Epilepsy is a heterogeneous clinical condition characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures, their causes and complications. The incidence, prevalence and mortality of epilepsy vary with age, place and time contributing to a variable extent to the burden of the disease. Diagnostic misclassification may have strong impact on personal and societal reflections of the disease in light of its clinical manifestations and the need for chronic treatment. Epilepsy accounts for a significant proportion of the world's disease burden ranking fourth after tension-type headache, migraine and Alzheimer disease...
May 2016: Pharmacological Research: the Official Journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society
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