keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Patient safety, human error

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092200/the-challenges-surrounding-preclinical-testing-in-transcatheter-device-development-and-the-implications-on-the-clinic
#1
Ralf Holzer, Jake Goble, Ziyad Hijazi
Transcatheter devices have contributed significantly to the advances achieved in treating many cardiovascular conditions over the last few decades. Sophisticated and detailed preclinical testing is not only a regulatory requirement to support an investigational device exemption (IDE) application, but more crucially its success and accuracy is needed to safeguard patients during the subsequent clinical testing stages. Areas Covered: This article covers the regulatory background as well as specific considerations related to pre-clinical testing of transcatheter devices...
January 16, 2017: Expert Review of Medical Devices
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079584/the-development-and-implementation-of-cognitive-aids-for-critical-events-in-pediatric-anesthesia-the-society-for-pediatric-anesthesia-critical-events-checklists
#2
Anna Clebone, Barbara K Burian, Scott C Watkins, Jorge A Gálvez, Justin L Lockman, Eugenie S Heitmiller
Cognitive aids such as checklists are commonly used in modern operating rooms for routine processes, and the use of such aids may be even more important during critical events. The Quality and Safety Committee of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) has developed a set of critical-event checklists and cognitive aids designed for 3 purposes: (1) as a repository of the latest evidence-based and expert opinion-based information to guide response and management of critical events, (2) as a source of just-in-time information during critical events, and (3) as a method to facilitate a shared understanding of required actions among team members during a critical event...
January 10, 2017: Anesthesia and Analgesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076342/knowledge-beliefs-and-attitudes-report-on-patient-care-and-safety-in-undergraduate-students-validating-the-modified-apsq-iii-questionnaire
#3
Ezequiel García Elorrio, Dolores Macchiavello, Viviana Rodriguez, Yael Catalano, Giuliana Corna, Josefina Dahinten, Marina Ontivero
INTRODUCTION: Patient safety aims to achieve healthcare free of damage. The World Health Organization indicates that this objective is achieved through communication, analysis, and prevention of adverse events in patients. Organizational culture has been identified as one of the main factors for interventions aimed to reduce medical errors; and an essential component of safety culture is the attitude of health professionals towards medical error. Attitudes can be improved through appropriate education in biomedical careers but its inclusion in Argentina is scarce...
December 20, 2016: Medwave
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28070607/-human-factors-in-medicine
#4
M Lazarovici, H Trentzsch, S Prückner
The concept of human factors is commonly used in the context of patient safety and medical errors, all too often ambiguously. In actual fact, the term comprises a wide range of meanings from human-machine interfaces through human performance and limitations up to the point of working process design; however, human factors prevail as a substantial cause of error in complex systems. This article presents the full range of the term human factors from the (emergency) medical perspective. Based on the so-called Swiss cheese model by Reason, we explain the different types of error, what promotes their emergence and on which level of the model error prevention can be initiated...
January 9, 2017: Der Anaesthesist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28067682/utilizing-a-human-factors-nursing-worksystem-improvement-framework-to-increase-nurses-time-at-the-bedside-and-enhance-safety
#5
C Adam Probst, Megan Carter, Caton Cadigan, Cortney Dalcour, Cindy Cassity, Penny Quinn, Tiana Williams, Donna Cook Montgomery, Claudia Wilder, Yan Xiao
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to increase nurses' time for direct patient care and improve safety via a novel human factors framework for nursing worksystem improvement. BACKGROUND: Time available for direct patient care influences outcomes, yet worksystem barriers prevent nurses adequate time at the bedside. METHODS: A novel human factors framework was developed for worksystem improvement in 3 units at 2 facilities. Objectives included improving nurse efficiency as measured by time-and-motion studies, reducing missing medications and subsequent trips to medication rooms and improving medication safety...
January 7, 2017: Journal of Nursing Administration
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28060982/-ethical-dilemmas-about-disclosure-of-errors-in-medicine
#6
Sebastián Lavanderos, Juan Pedraza, Moisés Russo N, Sofía P Salas
Since the publication of the Institute of Medicine’s report “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System” awareness of the importance of medical errors has increased. These are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and recent studies suggest that they can be the third leading cause of death in the United States. Difficulties have been identified by health personnel to prevent, detect and disclose to patients the occurrence of a medical error, an also to report them to the appropriate authorities. Although human error cannot be eliminated, it is possible to design safety systems to mitigate their frequency and consequences...
September 2016: Revista Médica de Chile
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28058456/-human-factors-in-medicine
#7
M Lazarovici, H Trentzsch, S Prückner
The concept of human factors is commonly used in the context of patient safety and medical errors, all too often ambiguously. In actual fact, the term comprises a wide range of meanings from human-machine interfaces through human performance and limitations up to the point of working process design; however, human factors prevail as a substantial cause of error in complex systems. This article presents the full range of the term human factors from the (emergency) medical perspective. Based on the so-called Swiss cheese model by Reason, we explain the different types of error, what promotes their emergence and on which level of the model error prevention can be initiated...
January 5, 2017: Der Urologe. Ausg. A
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28047931/su-f-t-249-application-of-human-factors-methods-usability-testing-in-the-radiation-oncology-environment
#8
H Warkentin, K Bubric, H Giovannetti, G Graham, C Clay
PURPOSE: As a quality improvement measure, we undertook this work to incorporate usability testing into the implementation procedures for new electronic documents and forms used by four affiliated radiation therapy centers. METHODS: A human factors specialist provided training in usability testing for a team of medical physicists, radiation therapists, and radiation oncologists from four radiotherapy centers. A usability testing plan was then developed that included controlled scenarios and standardized forms for qualitative and quantitative feedback from participants, including patients...
June 2016: Medical Physics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28039240/medication-safety-in-the-operating-room-literature-and-expert-based-recommendations
#9
J A Wahr, J H Abernathy, E H Lazarra, J R Keebler, M H Wall, I Lynch, R Wolfe, R L Cooper
Human error poses significant risk for hospitalized patients causing an estimated 100,000 to 400,000 deaths in the USA annually. Medication errors contribute, with error occurring in 5.3% of medication administrations during surgery. In this study 70.3% of medication errors were deemed preventable. Given the paucity of randomized controlled studies, we undertook a rigorous review of the literature to identify recommendations supported by expert opinions. An extensive literature search pertaining to medication error, medication safety, operating room, and anaesthesia was performed...
January 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28026210/interpretive-error-in-radiology
#10
Stephen Waite, Jinel Scott, Brian Gale, Travis Fuchs, Srinivas Kolla, Deborah Reede
OBJECTIVE: Although imaging technology has advanced significantly since the work of Garland in 1949, interpretive error rates remain unchanged. In addition to patient harm, interpretive errors are a major cause of litigation and distress to radiologists. In this article, we discuss the mechanics involved in searching an image, categorize omission errors, and discuss factors influencing diagnostic accuracy. Potential individual- and system-based solutions to mitigate or eliminate errors are also discussed...
December 27, 2016: AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27957697/benefit-of-slit-and-scit-for-allergic-rhinitis-and-asthma
#11
REVIEW
Giovanni Passalacqua, Giorgio Walter Canonica, Diego Bagnasco
Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been in use since more than one century, when Leonard Noon experimentally proved its efficacy in hayfever (Noon, in Lancet 1:1572-3, 1911). Since then, AIT was administered only as subcutaneous injections (SCIT) until the sublingual route (SLIT) was proposed in 1986. The use of SLIT was proposed following several surveys from the USA and UK that repeatedly reported fatalities due to SCIT (Lockey et al. in J Allergy Clin Immunol 75(1): 166, 1985; Lockey et al. in J Allergy Clin Immunol 660-77, 1985; Committee on the safety of medicines...
November 2016: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907031/in-vitro-pre-clinical-validation-of-suicide-gene-modified-anti-cd33-redirected-chimeric-antigen-receptor-t-cells-for-acute-myeloid-leukemia
#12
Kentaro Minagawa, Muhammad O Jamil, Mustafa Al-Obaidi, Larisa Pereboeva, Donna Salzman, Harry P Erba, Lawrence S Lamb, Ravi Bhatia, Shin Mineishi, Antonio Di Stasi
BACKGROUND: Approximately fifty percent of patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be cured with current therapeutic strategies which include, standard dose chemotherapy for patients at standard risk of relapse as assessed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis, or high-dose chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for high-risk patients. Despite allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant about 25% of patients still succumb to disease relapse, therefore, novel strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27863620/paediatric-airway-foreign-body-the-human-factors-influencing-patient-safety-in-our-hospitals
#13
O C Okonkwo, A Simons, J Nichani
Foreign bodies in the pediatric airway are an uncommon emergency with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Morbidity ranges from 10 to 20% worldwide and this pathology accounts for up to 7% of accidental deaths in children under 4. Dealing with this emergency safely and effectively is complex, requiring a tight coupling of procedures and processes and optimal anesthetic and operating conditions to prevent errors. These factors are recognized by the World Health Organization as 'Human Factors'. We perform a multi-center assessment of human factors pertinent to this emergency...
December 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27831511/diagnosis-treatment-and-prevention-of-hemodialysis-emergencies
#14
REVIEW
Manish Saha, Michael Allon
Given the high comorbidity in patients on hemodialysis and the complexity of the dialysis treatment, it is remarkable how rarely a life-threatening complication occurs during dialysis. The low rate of dialysis emergencies can be attributed to numerous safety features in modern dialysis machines; meticulous treatment and testing of the dialysate solution to prevent exposure to trace elements, toxins, and pathogens; adherence to detailed treatment protocols; and extensive training of dialysis staff to handle medical emergencies...
November 9, 2016: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: CJASN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779917/impact-of-checklist-use-on-wellness-and-post-elective-surgery-appointments-in-a-veterinary-teaching-hospital
#15
Rebecca Ruch-Gallie, Heather Weir, Lori R Kogan
Cognitive functioning is often compromised with increasing levels of stress and fatigue, both of which are often experienced by veterinarians. Many high-stress fields have implemented checklists to reduce human error. The use of these checklists has been shown to improve the quality of medical care, including adherence to evidence-based best practices and improvement of patient safety. Although it has been recognized that veterinary medicine would likely demonstrate similar benefits, there have been no published studies to date evaluating the use of checklists for improving quality of care in veterinary medicine...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27768654/measuring-patient-safety-the-medicare-patient-safety-monitoring-system-past-present-and-future
#16
David C Classen, William Munier, Nancy Verzier, Noel Eldridge, David Hunt, Mark Metersky, Chesley Richards, Yun Wang, P Jeffrey Brady, Amy Helwig, James Battles
The explicit declaration in the landmark 1999 Institute of Medicine report "To Err Is Human" that, in the United States, 44,000 to 98,000 patients die each year as a consequence of "medical errors" gave widespread validation to the magnitude of the patient safety problem and catalyzed a number of U.S. federal government programs to measure and improve the safety of the national healthcare system. After more than 10 years, one of those federal programs, the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System (MPSMS), has reached a level of maturity and stability that has made it useful for the consistent measurement of the safety of inpatient care...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Patient Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27715347/crucial-conversations-an-interprofessional-learning-opportunity-for-senior-healthcare-students
#17
Megan Delisle, Ruby Grymonpre, Rebecca Whitley, Debrah Wirtzfeld
Clinical errors due to human mistakes are estimated to result in 400,000 preventable deaths per year. Strategies to improve patient safety often rely on healthcare workers' ability to speak up with concerns. This becomes difficult during critical decision-making as a result of conflicting opinions and power differentials, themes underrepresented in many interprofessional initiatives. These elements are prominent in our interprofessional initiative, namely Crucial Conversations. We sought to evaluate this initiative as an interprofessional learning (IPL) opportunity for pre-licensure senior healthcare students, as a way to foster interprofessional collaboration, and as a method of empowering students to vocalise their concerns...
November 2016: Journal of Interprofessional Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27703622/a-first-step-toward-understanding-patient-safety
#18
Kyoung Ok Kim
Patient safety has become an important policy agenda in healthcare systems since publication of the 1999 report entitled "To Err Is Human." The paradigm has changed from blaming the individual for the error to identifying the weakness in the system that led to the adverse events. Anesthesia is one of the first healthcare specialties to adopt techniques and lessons from the aviation industry. The widespread use of simulation programs and the application of human factors engineering to clinical practice are the influences of the aviation industry...
October 2016: Korean Journal of Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27693764/improving-patient-safety-reporting-with-the-common-formats-common-data-representation-for-patient-safety-organizations
#19
Peter L Elkin, Henry C Johnson, Michael R Callahan, David C Classen
Medical errors and patient safety issues remain a significant problem for the healthcare industry in the United States. The Institute of Medicine report To Err is Human reported that there were as many as 98,000 deaths per year due to medical error as of 1999. Many authors and government officials believe that the first step on the path to improvement in patient safety is more comprehensive collection and analysis of patient safety events. The belief is that this will enable safety improvements based on data showing the nature and frequency of events that occur, and the effectiveness of interventions...
December 2016: Journal of Biomedical Informatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27687526/assessment-of-patient-safety-culture-what-tools-for-medical-students
#20
M Chaneliere, F Jacquet, P Occelli, S Touzet, V Siranyan, C Colin
BACKGROUND: The assessment of patient safety culture refers mainly to surveys exploring the perceptions of health professionals in hospitals. These surveys have less relevance when considering the assessment of the patient safety culture of medical students, especially at university or medical school. They are indeed not fully integrated in care units and constitute a heterogeneous population. This work aimed to find appropriate assessment tools of the patient safety culture of medical students...
September 29, 2016: BMC Medical Education
keyword
keyword
34029
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"