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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917161/the-interaction-between-plants-and-bacteria-in-the-remediation-of-petroleum-hydrocarbons-an-environmental-perspective
#1
REVIEW
Panagiotis Gkorezis, Matteo Daghio, Andrea Franzetti, Jonathan D Van Hamme, Wouter Sillen, Jaco Vangronsveld
Widespread pollution of terrestrial ecosystems with petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) has generated a need for remediation and, given that many PHCs are biodegradable, bio- and phyto-remediation are often viable approaches for active and passive remediation. This review focuses on phytoremediation with particular interest on the interactions between and use of plant-associated bacteria to restore PHC polluted sites. Plant-associated bacteria include endophytic, phyllospheric, and rhizospheric bacteria, and cooperation between these bacteria and their host plants allows for greater plant survivability and treatment outcomes in contaminated sites...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916987/weight-loss-induced-cellular-stress-in-subcutaneous-adipose-tissue-and-the-risk-for-weight-regain-in-overweight-and-obese-adults
#2
N J T Roumans, R G Vink, F G Bouwman, P Fazelzadeh, M A van Baak, E C M Mariman
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Weight loss is often followed by weight regain after the dietary intervention (DI). Cellular stress is increased in adipose tissue of obese individuals. However, the relation between cellular stress and weight regain is unclear. Previously, we observed increased adipose tissue cellular stress of participants regaining weight compared to participants maintaining weight loss. In the current study, we further investigated the relation between weight regain and changes in the expression of stress-related genes and stress protein levels to determine possible predictors of weight regain...
December 5, 2016: International Journal of Obesity: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898790/assessment-of-carbon-stocks-in-the-topsoil-using-random-forest-and-remote-sensing-images
#3
Jongsung Kim, Sabine Grunwald
Wetland soils are able to exhibit both consumption and production of greenhouse gases, and they play an important role in the regulation of the global carbon (C) cycle. Still, it is challenging to accurately evaluate the actual amount of C stored in wetlands. The incorporation of remote sensing data into digital soil models has great potential to assess C stocks in wetland soils. Our objectives were (i) to develop C stock prediction models utilizing remote sensing images and environmental ancillary data, (ii) to identify the prime environmental predictor variables that explain the spatial distribution of soil C, and (iii) to assess the amount of C stored in the top 20-cm soils of a prominent nutrient-enriched wetland...
November 2016: Journal of Environmental Quality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892685/gut-a-key-player-in-the-pathogenesis-of-type-2-diabetes
#4
Giovanna Muscogiuri, Giancarlo Balercia, Luigi Barrea, Angelo Cignarelli, Francesco Giorgino, Jens J Holst, Daniela Laudisio, Francesco Orio, Giacomo Tirabassi, Annamaria Colao
The gut regulates glucose and energy homeostasis; thus, the presence of ingested nutrients into the gut activates sensing mechanisms that affect both glucose homeostasis and regulate food intake. Increasing evidence suggest that gut may also play a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes which may be related to both the intestinal microbiological profile and patterns of gut hormones secretion. Intestinal microbiota includes trillions of microorganisms but its composition and function may be adversely affected in type 2 diabetes...
November 28, 2016: Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884781/epigenetic-mechanisms-underlying-lifespan-and-age-related-effects-of-dietary-restriction-and-the-ketogenic-diet
#5
Cesar L Moreno, Charles V Mobbs
Aging constitutes the central risk factor for major diseases including many forms of cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular diseases. The aging process is characterized by both global and tissue-specific changes in gene expression across taxonomically diverse species. While aging has historically been thought to entail cell-autonomous, even stochastic changes, recent evidence suggests that modulation of this process can be hierarchal, wherein manipulations of nutrient-sensing neurons (e.g., in the hypothalamus) produce peripheral effects that may modulate the aging process itself...
November 21, 2016: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27879335/catabolite-and-oxygen-regulation-of-enterohemorrhagic-escherichia-coli-virulence
#6
Kimberly M Carlson-Banning, Vanessa Sperandio
: The biogeography of the gut is diverse in its longitudinal axis, as well as within specific microenvironments. Differential oxygenation and nutrient composition drive the membership of microbial communities in these habitats. Moreover, enteric pathogens can orchestrate further modifications to gain a competitive advantage toward host colonization. These pathogens are versatile and adept when exploiting the human colon. They expertly navigate complex environmental cues and interkingdom signaling to colonize and infect their hosts...
November 22, 2016: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27877104/sweet-taste-receptor-serves-to-activate-glucose-and-leptin-responsive-neurons-in-the-hypothalamic-arcuate-nucleus-and-participates-in-glucose-responsiveness
#7
Daisuke Kohno, Miho Koike, Yuzo Ninomiya, Itaru Kojima, Tadahiro Kitamura, Toshihiko Yada
The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875531/loss-of-c9orf72-enhances-autophagic-activity-via-deregulated-mtor-and-tfeb-signaling
#8
Janet Ugolino, Yon Ju Ji, Karen Conchina, Justin Chu, Raja Sekhar Nirujogi, Akhilesh Pandey, Nathan R Brady, Anne Hamacher-Brady, Jiou Wang
The most common cause of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia is a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72. Here we report a study of the C9orf72 protein by examining the consequences of loss of C9orf72 functions. Deletion of one or both alleles of the C9orf72 gene in mice causes age-dependent lethality phenotypes. We demonstrate that C9orf72 regulates nutrient sensing as the loss of C9orf72 decreases phosphorylation of the mTOR substrate S6K1. The transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal and autophagy genes, which is negatively regulated by mTOR, is substantially up-regulated in C9orf72 loss-of-function animal and cellular models...
November 2016: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27874999/environmental-controls-on-canopy-foliar-nitrogen-distributions-in-a-neotropical-lowland-forest
#9
Christopher S Balzotti, Gregory P Asner, Philip G Taylor, Cory C Cleveland, Rebecca Cole, Roberta E Martin, Megan Nasto, Brooke B Osborne, Stephen Porder, Alan R Townsend
Distributions of foliar nutrients across forest canopies can give insight into their plant functional diversity and improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling. We used airborne remote sensing and partial least squares regression to quantify canopy foliar nitrogen (foliar N) across ~164 km(2) of wet lowland tropical forest in the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. We determined the relative influence of climate and topography on the observed patterns of foliar N using a gradient boosting model technique. At a local scale, where climate and substrate were constant, we explored the influence of slope position on foliar N by quantifying foliar N on remnant terraces, their adjacent slopes, and knife-edged ridges...
December 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27874045/morphological-and-proteomic-analysis-of-biofilms-from-the-antarctic-archaeon-halorubrum-lacusprofundi
#10
Y Liao, T J Williams, J Ye, J Charlesworth, B P Burns, A Poljak, M J Raftery, R Cavicchioli
Biofilms enhance rates of gene exchange, access to specific nutrients, and cell survivability. Haloarchaea in Deep Lake, Antarctica, are characterized by high rates of intergenera gene exchange, metabolic specialization that promotes niche adaptation, and are exposed to high levels of UV-irradiation in summer. Halorubrum lacusprofundi from Deep Lake has previously been reported to form biofilms. Here we defined growth conditions that promoted the formation of biofilms and used microscopy and enzymatic digestion of extracellular material to characterize biofilm structures...
November 22, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27868313/nutrient-dependent-increased-dendritic-arborization-of-somatosensory-neurons
#11
Kaori Watanabe, Yuki Furumizo, Tadao Usui, Yukako Hattori, Tadashi Uemura
Suboptimal nutrition imposes developmental constraints on infant animals, which marshal adaptive responses to eventually become mature adults. Such responses are mounted at multiple levels from systemic to cellular. At the cellular level, the underlying mechanisms of cell proliferation control have been intensively studied. However, less is known about how growth of postmitotic and morphologically complex cells, such as neurons, is controlled by nutritional status. We address this question using Class I and Class IV dendritic arborization neurons in Drosophila larvae...
November 21, 2016: Genes to Cells: Devoted to Molecular & Cellular Mechanisms
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27867975/the-ampk-skp2-carm1-axis-links-nutrient-sensing-to-transcriptional-and-epigenetic-regulation-of-autophagy
#12
EDITORIAL
Ziheng Xu, Daniel J Klionsky
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27867310/the-north-wyke-farm-platform-effect-of-temperate-grassland-farming-systems-on-soil-moisture-contents-runoff-and-associated-water-quality-dynamics
#13
R J Orr, P J Murray, C J Eyles, M S A Blackwell, L M Cardenas, A L Collins, J A J Dungait, K W T Goulding, B A Griffith, S J Gurr, P Harris, J M B Hawkins, T H Misselbrook, C Rawlings, A Shepherd, H Sint, T Takahashi, K N Tozer, A P Whitmore, L Wu, M R F Lee
: The North Wyke Farm Platform was established as a United Kingdom national capability for collaborative research, training and knowledge exchange in agro-environmental sciences. Its remit is to research agricultural productivity and ecosystem responses to different management practices for beef and sheep production in lowland grasslands. A system based on permanent pasture was implemented on three 21-ha farmlets to obtain baseline data on hydrology, nutrient cycling and productivity for 2 years...
July 2016: European Journal of Soil Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27829484/invited-review-nutrient-sensing-receptors-for-free-fatty-acids-and-hydroxycarboxylic-acids-in-farm-animals
#14
M Mielenz
Data on nutrient sensing by free fatty acid receptors (FFAR1, FFAR2, FFAR3, FFAR4) and hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors (HCAR1, HCAR2) are increasing for human or rodent models. Both receptor families link intestinal fermentation by the microbiota and energy metabolism with cellular responses. Therefore, this finding provides a link that is independent of the only function of the fermentation products as energy substrates. For example, these reactions are associated with insulin secretion, regulation of lipolysis, adipose tissue differentiation and innate immune responses...
November 10, 2016: Animal: An International Journal of Animal Bioscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27822708/quorum-sensing-and-quorum-quenching-in-the-phycosphere-of-phytoplankton-a-case-of-chemical-interactions-in-ecology
#15
REVIEW
Jean Luc Rolland, Didier Stien, Sophie Sanchez-Ferandin, Raphaël Lami
The interactions between bacteria and phytoplankton regulate many important biogeochemical reactions in the marine environment, including those in the global carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles. At the microscopic level, it is now well established that important consortia of bacteria colonize the phycosphere, the immediate environment of phytoplankton cells. In this microscale environment, abundant bacterial cells are organized in a structured biofilm, and exchange information through the diffusion of small molecules called semiochemicals...
November 7, 2016: Journal of Chemical Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27820704/gastrointestinal-hormones-and-the-gut-connectome
#16
Lihua Ye, Rodger A Liddle
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Provision of adequate nutrients by the gut is essential for survival and essential behaviors are linked to the proper ingestion and digestion of food. Recently, a new neural connection has been reported between sensory cells of the gut epithelium and the nervous system that mediates signals from the gut to the brain. RECENT FINDINGS: This review describes how the gut senses its environment, relays those signals to the brain, and how the brain influences the gut...
November 4, 2016: Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Obesity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27819057/taste-receptors-regulators-of-sinonasal-innate-immunity
#17
Ryan M Carey, Nithin D Adappa, James N Palmer, Robert J Lee, Noam A Cohen
Taste receptors in the oral cavity guide our preferences for foods, preventing toxic ingestions and encouraging proper nutrient consumption. More recently, expression of taste receptors has been demonstrated in other locations throughout the body, including the airway, gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and brain. The extent and specific roles of "extraoral" taste receptors are largely unknown, but a growing body of evidence suggests that taste receptors in the airway serve a critical role in sensing bacteria and regulating innate immunity...
August 2016: Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27818663/grafting-a-technique-to-modify-ion-accumulation-in-horticultural-crops
#18
REVIEW
Muhammad A Nawaz, Muhammad Imtiaz, Qiusheng Kong, Fei Cheng, Waqar Ahmed, Yuan Huang, Zhilong Bie
Grafting is a centuries-old technique used in plants to obtain economic benefits. Grafting increases nutrient uptake and utilization efficiency in a number of plant species, including fruits, vegetables, and ornamentals. Selected rootstocks of the same species or close relatives are utilized in grafting. Rootstocks absorb more water and ions than self-rooted plants and transport these water and ions to the aboveground scion. Ion uptake is regulated by a complex communication mechanism between the scion and rootstock...
2016: Frontiers in Plant Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27812977/ampk-and-placental-progenitor-cells
#19
Melissa R Kaufman, Thomas L Brown
AMPK is important in numerous physiological systems but plays a vital role in embryonic and placental development. The placenta is a unique organ that is the essential lifeline between the mother and baby during pregnancy and gestation. During placental development, oxygen concentrations are very low until cells differentiate to establish the appropriate lineages that take on new functions required for placental and embryonic survival. Balancing the oxygen regulatory environment with the demands for energy and need to maintain metabolism during this process places AMPK at the center of maintaining placental cellular homeostasis as it integrates and responds to numerous complex stimuli...
2016: EXS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27808250/mtorc1-inhibitor-rapamycin-and-er-stressor-tunicamycin-induce-differential-patterns-of-er-mitochondria-coupling
#20
Roberto Bravo-Sagua, Camila López-Crisosto, Valentina Parra, Marcelo Rodriguez-Peña, Beverly A Rothermel, Andrew F G Quest, Sergio Lavandero
Efficient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake takes place at contact points between the ER and mitochondria, and represents a key regulator of many cell functions. In a previous study with HeLa cells, we showed that ER-to-mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer increases during the early phase of ER stress induced by tunicamycin as an adaptive response to stimulate mitochondrial bioenergetics. It remains unknown whether other types of stress signals trigger similar responses. Here we observed that rapamycin, which inhibits the nutrient-sensing complex mTORC1, increased ER-mitochondria coupling in HeLa cells to a similar extent as did tunicamycin...
November 3, 2016: Scientific Reports
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