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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26862116/our-better-angels-and-black-boxes
#1
EDITORIAL
Pat Croskerry
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2016: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26077213/when-i-say%C3%A2-cognitive-debiasing
#2
Pat Croskerry
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2015: Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25544999/in-reply-to-webster
#3
LETTER
Pat Croskerry, David A Petrie, James B Reilly, Gordon Tait
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2015: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25160829/in-reply-to-norman-et-al-and-to-ilgen-et-al
#4
LETTER
Pat Croskerry, David A Petrie, James B Reilly, Gordon Tait
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2014: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24423996/ed-cognition-any-decision-by-anyone-at-any-time
#5
Pat Croskerry
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2014: CJEM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24362398/deciding-about-fast-and-slow-decisions
#6
COMMENT
Pat Croskerry, David A Petrie, James B Reilly, Gordon Tait
Two reports in this issue address the important topic of clinical decision making. Dual process theory has emerged as the dominant model for understanding the complex processes that underlie human decision making. This theory distinguishes between the reflexive, autonomous processes that characterize intuitive decision making and the deliberate reasoning of an analytical approach. In this commentary, the authors address the polarization of viewpoints that has developed around the relative merits of the two systems...
February 2014: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23996094/cognitive-debiasing-2-impediments-to-and-strategies-for-change
#7
Pat Croskerry, Geeta Singhal, Sílvia Mamede
In a companion paper, we proposed that cognitive debiasing is a skill essential in developing sound clinical reasoning to mitigate the incidence of diagnostic failure. We reviewed the origins of cognitive biases and some proposed mechanisms for how debiasing processes might work. In this paper, we first outline a general schema of how cognitive change occurs and the constraints that may apply. We review a variety of individual factors, many of them biases themselves, which may be impediments to change. We then examine the major strategies that have been developed in the social sciences and in medicine to achieve cognitive and affective debiasing, including the important concept of forcing functions...
October 2013: BMJ Quality & Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23958723/ed-cognition-any-decision-by-anyone-at-any-time
#8
Pat Croskerry
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2013: CJEM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23882089/cognitive-debiasing-1-origins-of-bias-and-theory-of-debiasing
#9
Pat Croskerry, Geeta Singhal, Sílvia Mamede
Numerous studies have shown that diagnostic failure depends upon a variety of factors. Psychological factors are fundamental in influencing the cognitive performance of the decision maker. In this first of two papers, we discuss the basics of reasoning and the Dual Process Theory (DPT) of decision making. The general properties of the DPT model, as it applies to diagnostic reasoning, are reviewed. A variety of cognitive and affective biases are known to compromise the decision-making process. They mostly appear to originate in the fast intuitive processes of Type 1 that dominate (or drive) decision making...
October 2013: BMJ Quality & Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/23802513/from-mindless-to-mindful-practice-cognitive-bias-and-clinical-decision-making
#10
Pat Croskerry
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 368, Issue 26, Page 2445-2448, June 2013.
June 27, 2013: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/22874447/perspectives-on-diagnostic-failure-and-patient-safety
#11
REVIEW
Pat Croskerry
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2012: Healthcare Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21955412/consensus-on-paramedic-clinical-decisions-during-high-acuity-emergency-calls-results-of-a-canadian-delphi-study
#12
Jan L Jensen, Pat Croskerry, Andrew H Travers
OBJECTIVES: To establish consensus on the most important clinical decisions paramedics make during high-acuity emergency calls and to visualize these decisions on a process map of an emergency call. A secondary objective was to measure agreement among paramedics and medical director panel members. METHODS: A multiround online survey of Canadian paramedics and medical directors. In round 1, participants listed important clinical decisions. In round 2, participants scored each decision in terms of its importance for patient outcome and safety...
September 2011: CJEM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21500605/emotional-influences-in-patient-safety
#13
REVIEW
Pat Croskerry, Allan Abbass, Albert W Wu
OBJECTIVE: The way that health care providers feel, both within themselves and toward their patients, may influence their clinical performance and impact patient safety, yet this aspect of provider behavior has received relatively little attention. How providers feel, their emotional or affective state, may exert a significant, unintended influence on their patients, and may compromise safety. METHODS: We examined a broad literature across multiple disciplines to review the interrelationships between emotion, decision making, and behavior, and to assess their potential impact on patient safety...
December 2010: Journal of Patient Safety
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21248608/checklists-to-reduce-diagnostic-errors
#14
John W Ely, Mark L Graber, Pat Croskerry
Diagnostic errors are common and can often be traced to physicians' cognitive biases and failed heuristics (mental shortcuts). A great deal is known about how these faulty thinking processes lead to error, but little is known about how to prevent them. Faulty thinking plagues other high-risk, high-reliability professions, such as airline pilots and nuclear plant operators, but these professions have reduced errors by using checklists. Recently, checklists have gained acceptance in medical settings, such as operating rooms and intensive care units...
March 2011: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21191201/commentary-lowly-interns-more-is-merrier-and-the-casablanca-strategy
#15
COMMENT
Pat Croskerry
Test ordering is an integral part of clinical decision making. Variation in test-ordering behavior appears to reflect uncertainty in the clinical reasoning and decision-making process. Among decision makers, novices function mostly in the analytic mode of reasoning, experiencing high levels of uncertainty and, therefore, account for the most variance. While less discriminate test ordering has both economical and clinical downsides, it nevertheless remains a rite of passage along the road toward expertise. In response to the article by Iwashyna and colleagues, the author of this commentary reflects on the implications of test-ordering behavior in the academic medicine setting...
January 2011: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21169920/evidence-and-its-uses-in-health-care-and-research-the-role-of-critical-thinking
#16
REVIEW
Milos Jenicek, Pat Croskerry, David L Hitchcock
Obtaining and critically appraising evidence is clearly not enough to make better decisions in clinical care. The evidence should be linked to the clinician's expertise, the patient's individual circumstances (including values and preferences), and clinical context and settings. We propose critical thinking and decision-making as the tools for making that link. Critical thinking is also called for in medical research and medical writing, especially where pre-canned methodologies are not enough. It is also involved in our exchanges of ideas at floor rounds, grand rounds and case discussions; our communications with patients and lay stakeholders in health care; and our writing of research papers, grant applications and grant reviews...
January 2011: Medical Science Monitor: International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/20231338/to-err-is-human-and-let-s-not-forget-it
#17
Pat Croskerry
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 23, 2010: CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, Journal de L'Association Medicale Canadienne
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/20090077/patient-safety-and-diagnostic-error-tips-for-your-next-shift
#18
Doug Sinclair, Pat Croskerry
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2010: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19772558/paramedic-clinical-decision-making-during-high-acuity-emergency-calls-design-and-methodology-of-a-delphi-study
#19
Jan L Jensen, Pat Croskerry, Andrew H Travers
BACKGROUND: The scope of practice of paramedics in Canada has steadily evolved to include increasingly complex interventions in the prehospital setting, which likely have repercussions on clinical outcome and patient safety. Clinical decision making has been evaluated in several health professions, but there is a paucity of work in this area on paramedics. This study will utilize the Delphi technique to establish consensus on the most important instances of paramedic clinical decision making during high acuity emergency calls, as they relate to clinical outcome and patient safety...
2009: BMC Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19669918/clinical-cognition-and-diagnostic-error-applications-of-a-dual-process-model-of-reasoning
#20
Pat Croskerry
Both systemic and individual factors contribute to missed or delayed diagnoses. Among the multiple factors that impact clinical performance of the individual, the caliber of cognition is perhaps the most relevant and deserves our attention and understanding. In the last few decades, cognitive psychologists have gained substantial insights into the processes that underlie cognition, and a new, universal model of reasoning and decision making has emerged, Dual Process Theory. The theory has immediate application to medical decision making and provides an overall schema for understanding the variety of theoretical approaches that have been taken in the past...
September 2009: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
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