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Catheters review

Barbara J Wilson, Laura J Zitella, Colleen H Erb, Jackie Foster, Mary Peterson, Sylvia K Wood
BACKGROUND: Cancer-related infections lead to increases in mortality, antibiotic use, and hospital stays. Other adverse outcomes include dose delays and reductions, which can result in suboptimal treatment outcomes. OBJECTIVES: Effective implementation of risk assessment and evidence-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of infection are essential to improve care and reduce costs related to infections in patients with cancer receiving immunosuppressive therapy...
April 1, 2018: Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing
Maxim Yu Rykov, Sergei V Zaborovskij, Alexander N Shvecov, Vladimir V Shukin
PURPOSE: To review our experience with peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric cancer patients. METHODS: The analysis included 353 patients (3 months up to 17 years, mean age 11.2 years) with a variety of cancers diseases, which in 2011-2016, 354 peripherally inserted central catheters were placed. All settings are carried out using ultrasound guidance. In 138 (39%) patients, external anatomical landmarks were used and in 216 (61%) intraoperative fluoroscopy...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Ryan P Donahue, Andrew W Stamm, Robert P Gibbons, Christopher R Porter, Kathleen C Kobashi, John M Corman, Una J Lee
INTRODUCTION: The ureteral stent is engrained in the fabric of urologic practice. Virginia Mason Medical Center had a unique role in its development through the pioneering work of Dr. Robert Gibbons. Here, we review his contribution to the evolution of the modern ureteral stent. METHODS: We reviewed Dr. Gibbons' extensive work through primary sources, including interviews, projector slides, radiology images, stent prototypes, his personal writings and archived documents...
March 12, 2018: Urology
Ohad Ronen, Alexander Gurevich, Shimon Ivry, Edward Altman, Evgeni Kukuev
We describe a modified technique for percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy using a 15F tube exchanger or Eschmann catheter. A retrospective review of 1180 procedures using this modified technique demonstrated it to be effective with a failure rate of only 0.25% (3 patients). Moreover, it provides an additional safeguard with the ability to rapidly reintroduce the endotracheal tube into the trachea guided by the exchange catheter in the event of accidental extubation during the procedure. This technique needs no additional special devices or equipment (eg, a bronchoscope)...
March 14, 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Mitko Kocarev, Fouzia Khalid, Fatima Khatoon, Roshan Fernando
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neuraxial labor analgesia remains the most effective and one of the most commonly utilized methods for pain relief during labor. This narrative review article is a summary of the literature published in 2017 on neuraxial analgesia for labor. RECENT FINDINGS: From a total of 41 identified articles, 13 were included in the review. The topics have been structured into three categories: initiation of neuraxial analgesia, maintenance of neuraxial analgesia, and neuraxial analgesia and obstetric outcomes...
March 14, 2018: Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
James C Barton, Jackson Clayborn Barton, Luigi F Bertoli
BACKGROUND: We sought to learn more about the utility and safety of implanted ports for monthly immunoglobulin G infusions in adults with primary immune deficiency. METHODS: We reviewed charts of adults who were referred to a single practice during the interval 2006-2016 for evaluation and management of frequent or severe upper and lower respiratory tract and other infections, subnormal total immunoglobulin G or immunoglobulin G subclasses, and suboptimal responses to polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccinations; were diagnosed to have primary immune deficiency; and were advised to undergo immunoglobulin G therapy...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Afsha Aurshina, Anil Hingorani, Ahmad Alsheekh, Pavel Kibrik, Natalie Marks, Enrico Ascher
OBJECTIVE: It has been a widely accepted practice that a previous placed pacemaker, automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators, or central line can be a contraindication to placing a hemodialysis catheter in the ipsilateral jugular vein. Fear of dislodging pacing wires, tunneling close to the battery site or causing venous obstruction has been a concern for surgeons and interventionalists alike. We suggest that this phobia may be unfounded. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted of patients in whom hemodialysis catheters were placed over a period of 10 years...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Dominik Linz, R Doug McEvoy, Martin R Cowie, Virend K Somers, Stanley Nattel, Patrick Lévy, Jonathan M Kalman, Prashanthan Sanders
Importance: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common clinically significant breathing abnormality during sleep. It is highly prevalent among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), and it promotes arrhythmogenesis and impairs treatment efficacy. Observations: The prevalence of OSA ranges from 3% to 49% in population-based studies and from 21% to 74% in patients with AF. Diagnosis and treatment of OSA in patients with AF requires a close interdisciplinary collaboration between electrophysiologists, cardiologists, and sleep specialists...
March 14, 2018: JAMA Cardiology
Peter Paik, Sanjay K Arukala, Anupam A Sule
Central venous catheters are placed in approximately five million patients annually in the US. The preferred site of insertion is one with fewer risks and easier access. Although the right internal jugular vein is preferred, on occasion, the left internal jugular may have to be accessed. A patient was admitted for septic shock, cerebrovascular accident, and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. A central venous line was needed for antibiotic and vasopressor administration. Due to trauma from a fall to the right side and previously failed catheterization attempts at the left subclavian and femoral veins, the left internal jugular vein was accessed...
January 9, 2018: Curēus
Nancy E Epstein
Background: The risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) due to decreased cord perfusion following thoracic/thoracoabdominal aneurysm surgery (T/TL-AAA) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) ranges up to 20%. For decades, therefore, many vascular surgeons have utilized cerebrospinal fluid drainage (CSFD) to decrease intraspinal pressure and increase blood flow to the spinal cord, thus reducing the risk of SCI/ischemia. Methods: Multiple studies previously recommend utilizing CSFD following T/TL-AAA/TEVAR surgery to treat SCI by increasing spinal cord blood flow...
2018: Surgical Neurology International
Julien Ternacle, Romain Gallet, Annabelle Nguyen, Jean-François Deux, Antonio Fiore, Emmanuel Teiger, Jean-Luc Dubois-Randé, Elisabeth Riant, Pascal Lim
Percutaneous approaches to treat structural heart diseases are growing in number and complexity. Multimodality imaging is essential for planning and monitoring such interventions. The combination of three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography with fluoroscopy is the cornerstone of interventional imaging. However, these two modalities are displayed on separate screens, and are handled by different physicians, which requires a complex mental reconstruction for the interventional team. To overcome this issue, echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging has been introduced recently in clinical practice...
March 11, 2018: Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases
Jessica MacLean, Tamara MacDonald, Carol Digout, Nadine Smith, Krista Rigby, Ketan Kulkarni
BACKGROUND: Central venous catheter (CVC) dysfunction is a common complication among pediatric cancer patients. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is administered to resolve CVC dysfunction. The present study was designed to determine risk factors associated with requirement of tPA for CVC dysfunction and to assess the clinical impact of CVC dysfunction in terms of CVC loss and venous thrombotic events (VTE). PROCEDURE: Case records of all pediatric patients with cancer from the Maritimes, Canada were reviewed following ethics approval...
March 14, 2018: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Su-Hee Cho, Ji-Ye Lee, Kyeong-Hwa Ryu, Dae Chul Suh
Purpose: False positive diagnoses of cerebral aneurysm via magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) screening may increase unnecessary cerebral catheter angiography. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of medical liability on medical decision-making during radiologic interpretation. Materials and Methods: We included 56 consecutive patients who were referred with suspected aneurysm based on MRA or computed tomography angiography (CTA) and showed no aneurysm on subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA)...
March 2018: Neurointervention
Jasper M Smit, Reinder Raadsen, Michiel J Blans, Manfred Petjak, Peter M Van de Ven, Pieter R Tuinman
BACKGROUND: Insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC) is common practice in critical care medicine. Complications arising from CVC placement are mostly due to a pneumothorax or malposition. Correct position is currently confirmed by chest x-ray, while ultrasonography might be a more suitable option. We performed a meta-analysis of the available studies with the primary aim of synthesizing information regarding detection of CVC-related complications and misplacement using ultrasound (US)...
March 13, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Nathalie Rousseau, Albert Mudry
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: In Western medicine, the long history of the ear syringe dates back at least to the end of the 1st millennium BCE; but the corresponding Ancient Greek word surinx designates another tool. Other Greek and Latin words and phrases, in particular auricular clyster, otenchytes, and pyoulcos, were known as names of the ear syringe until modern times. The aim of this article is to study the Greek and Latin words and phrases referred to as names of the ear syringe up until modern times before syringe became the standard word...
April 2018: Otology & Neurotology
Paul Abraham, Diego A Arroyo, Raphael Giraud, Henri Bounameaux, Karim Bendjelid
While systemic intravenous thrombolysis decreases mortality in patients with high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE), it clearly increases haemorrhagic risk. There are many contraindications to thrombolysis, and efforts should aim at selecting those patients who will benefit most, without suffering complications. The current review summarises the evidence for the use of thrombolytic therapy in PE. It clarifies the pathophysiological mechanisms in PE and acute cor pulmonale that increase the risk of bleeding following thrombolysis...
2018: Open Heart
J Martel Villagrán, M J Díaz Candamio, A Bueno Horcajadas
OBJECTIVES: We aim to review the characteristics of Morel-Lavallée lesions and to evaluate their treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 17 patients (11 men and 6 women; mean age, 56.1 years, range 25-81 years) diagnosed with Morel-Lavallée lesions in two different departments. All patients underwent ultrasonography, 5 underwent computed tomography, and 9 underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Percutaneous treatment with fine-needle aspiration and/or drainage with a 6F-8F catheter was performed in 13 patients...
March 9, 2018: Radiología
Kazuhiko Morii, Takeharu Yamamoto, Shinichiro Nakamura, Hiroaki Okushin
Objective An infectious hepatic cyst (IHC) is a hepatic cyst complicated with secondary infection and is generally assumed to be rare. However, we have experienced no small number of patients with IHC in recent clinical practice. We therefore examined the incidence and clinical characteristics of IHC. Methods The medical records of patients with IHC who were hospitalized at our institution between January 2012 and December 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Their demographic factors, biochemical, bacteriological, imaging, and treatment results were explored and compared with those of patients with pyogenic liver abscess (PLA)...
March 9, 2018: Internal Medicine
V Hoerr, M Franz, M W Pletz, M Diab, S Niemann, C Faber, T Doenst, P C Schulze, S Deinhardt-Emmer, B Löffler
Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening disease, caused by septic vegetations and inflammatory foci on the surface of the endothelium and the valves. Due to its complex and often indecisive presentation the mortality rate is still about 30%. Most frequently bacterial microorganisms entering the bloodstream are the underlying origin of the intracardiac infection. While the disease was primarily restricted to younger patients suffering from rheumatic heart streptococci infections, new at risk categories for Staphylococcus (S...
February 21, 2018: International Journal of Medical Microbiology: IJMM
Paul S Pagel, Lonnie Dye, Brent T Boettcher, Julie K Freed
OBJECTIVE: Blood flow across the mitral valve during early left ventricular (LV) filling produces a 3-dimensional rotational fluid body, known as a vortex ring, that enhances LV filling efficiency. Diastolic dysfunction is common in elderly patients, but the influence of advanced age on vortex formation is unknown. The authors tested the hypothesis that advanced age is associated with a reduction in LV filling efficiency quantified using vortex formation time (VFT) in octogenarians undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
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