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Australian Nursing

Joan Garvan
BACKGROUND: Changes to gendered norms have been the single most significant development in the second part of the twentieth century; practices within families have mirrored these changes. Many, however, are falling by the wayside after the birth of an infant, with high rates of marital breakdown, high rates of anxiety and depression, and significant issues related to identity. OBJECTIVES/AIMS: The aim of this research was to gauge how a sample of Australian women were travelling through the Transition to Parenthood, particularly in terms of their relationships; sharing the care and housework; their life course; and their sense of self...
October 14, 2016: Contemporary Nurse
Vicki Catherine Cope, Bronwyn Jones, Joyce Hendricks
AIM: To explore residential aged care nurses working in interim, rehabilitation and residential aged care perceptions of resilience. DESIGN: Qualitative Portraiture methodology. Inclusion criteria were that all participants were English speaking; were registered with the Australian Health Practitioners Registration Authority (APHRA) and had more than five years' experience working in an aged care environment. Three participants were interviewed employed within a metropolitan interim, rehabilitation and aged care setting...
October 14, 2016: Contemporary Nurse
Anthony Tuckett, John L Oliffe
The aim of this research is to describe the experiences of Australian and New Zealand nursing and midwifery students looking for employment after graduation. This qualitative study draws from 2008, 2009 and 2010 responses provided by 197 recently graduated Australian and New Zealand nurses and midwives to, Describe your experiences gaining employment as a nurse or midwife after graduation. Two themes were inductively derived, Taking what you can get and I had a job lined up. Within the taking what you can get theme, respondents efforts to gain employment as a nurse or midwife after graduation were challenged by limited choices round the type of clinical practice available and/or job insecurity...
October 12, 2016: International Journal of Nursing Practice
Katherine Lambe, Judy Currey, Julie Considine
BACKGROUND: Understanding of clinical deterioration of emergency department patients is rapidly evolving. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and nature of vital sign collection and clinical deterioration in emergency care. METHODS: A descriptive exploratory approach was used. Data were collected from the records of 200 randomly selected adults with presenting complaints of abdominal pain, shortness of breath, chest pain and febrile illness from 1 January to 31 December 2014 at a 22 bed emergency department in Melbourne, Australia...
October 7, 2016: Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal: AENJ
Iain A Kaan, Geoffrey McCaughan, Tracey Jones
OBJECTIVE: To determine the likely current capacity of accredited treatment centres in treating hepatitis C (HCV) patients with Interferon free Direct Acting (DAA) Antiviral agents in Australia. METHOD: Data was collected from 22 centres before the introduction of DAA therapy - 11 sites from the Study 1 survey and an additional 11 sites from the Study 2 survey. The sites were selected based on consensus by viral hepatitis experts, in consultation with the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation...
September 26, 2016: Internal Medicine Journal
Grainne Lowe, Virginia Plummer, Leanne Boyd
Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate and describe the application of a change management theoretical framework in relation to nurse practitioner (NP) role integration.Methods A survey formed Phase 1 of a broader mixed-methods study to explore perceptions of the change process involved with integrating NPs into Australian health care settings. The stakeholder participants were NPs, nurse managers and nurse policy advisers.Results Key themes were identified adding information about how NPs, nurse managers and nurse policy advisers perceive the integration of NPs into Australian healthcare...
October 7, 2016: Australian Health Review: a Publication of the Australian Hospital Association
Diane Chamberlain, Allison Williams, David Stanley, Peter Mellor, Wendy Cross, Lesley Siegloff
BACKGROUND: Nursing students will graduate into stressful workplace environments and resilience is an essential acquired ability for surviving the workplace. Few studies have explored the relationship between resilience and the degree of innate dispositional mindfulness, compassion, compassion fatigue and burnout in nursing students, including those who find themselves in the position of needing to work in addition to their academic responsibilities. AIM: This paper investigates the predictors of resilience, including dispositional mindfulness and employment status of third year nursing students from three Australian universities...
October 2016: Nurs Open
Lynn McDonald
AIM: The aim of this paper was to explore the contribution of Mary Seacole to nursing and health care, notably in comparison with that of Florence Nightingale. BACKGROUND: Much information is available, in print and electronic, that presents Mary Seacole as a nurse, even as a pioneer nurse and leader in public health care. Her own memoir and copious primary sources, show rather than she was a businesswoman, who gave assistance during the Crimean War, mainly to officers...
January 2016: Nurs Open
Narelle Borrott, Sharon Kinney, Fiona Newall, Allison Williams, Noel Cranswick, Ian Wong, Elizabeth Manias
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To examine how communication between nurses and doctors occurred for managing medications in inpatient paediatric settings. BACKGROUND: Communication between health professionals influences medication incidents' occurrence and safe care. DESIGN: An ethnographic study was undertaken. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews, observations and focus groups were conducted in three clinical areas of an Australian tertiary paediatric hospital...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Gulzar Malik, Lisa Mckenna, Debra Griffiths
AIMS: The study aimed to explore the processes undertaken by nurse academics when integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into their teaching and learning practices. This paper focuses on pedagogical approaches employed by academics to influence evidence-based practice integration into undergraduate programs across Australian universities. BACKGROUND: Nursing academics are challenged to incorporate a variety of teaching and learning strategies to teach evidence-based practice and determine their effectiveness...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Christopher J Gordon, Peter B Hudson, Mark B Plenderleith, Murray Fisher, Judy A Craft
Nursing students have reported bioscience to be challenging and difficult to understand. This might have a negative impact upon their ability to understand patients' clinical conditions and nursing practice. We sought information about students' experiences with bioscience. A total of 126 final year nursing students completed a questionnaire. The findings showed that the majority of participants considered bioscience subjects to require more work compared to nursing subjects (65.9%), and that they would like a better understanding of bioscience (73...
October 5, 2016: Nursing & Health Sciences
Kerrie Doyle, Catherine Hungerford, Michelle Cleary
In Australia, 'indigeneity' is not determined by skin colour, but rather by a person's heritage, acceptance by an indigenous community, and active participation in the affairs of that indigenous community. Some people who identify as indigenous, however, have experienced 'colourism' - that is, experiences of social exclusion because of the colour of their skin - from non-Indigenous and also Indigenous Australians. This paper describes research that explored the effect of intra-racial exclusion on the mental health and wellbeing of Indigenous Australians, with a particular focus on skin colour or 'manifest indigeneity'...
October 5, 2016: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Wendy Chaboyer, Tracey Bucknall, Joan Webster, Elizabeth McInnes, Brigid M Gillespie, Merrilyn Banks, Jennifer A Whitty, Lukman Thalib, Shelley Roberts, Mandy Tallott, Nicky Cullum, Marianne Wallis
BACKGROUND: Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are a serious patient safety concern, associated with poor patient outcomes and high healthcare costs. They are also viewed as an indicator of nursing care quality. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle in preventing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers among at risk patients. DESIGN: Pragmatic cluster randomised trial. SETTING: Eight tertiary referral hospitals with >200 beds each in three Australian states...
September 23, 2016: International Journal of Nursing Studies
Paul Morrison, Norman J Stomski, Tom Meehan
BACKGROUND: Currently, little is known about mental health nurses' management of antipsychotic medication side effects. AIMS: This study examined how Australian mental health nurses' attitudes and service processes influence the assessment of antipsychotic medication side effects. METHODS: Participants were included if they were registered nurses in Australian mental health settings. An online questionnaire was distributed via email. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between attitudes and awareness, and use of antipsychotic medication assessment tools...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Mental Health
Christine Toye, Richard Parsons, Susan Slatyer, Samar M Aoun, Rachael Moorin, Rebecca Osseiran-Moisson, Keith D Hill
BACKGROUND: Hospital discharge of older people receiving care at home offers a salient opportunity to identify and address their family caregivers' self-identified support needs. OBJECTIVES: This study tested the hypothesis that the extent to which family caregivers of older people discharged home from hospital felt prepared to provide care at home would be positively influenced by their inclusion in the new Further Enabling Care at Home program. DESIGN: This single-blind randomised controlled trial compared outcomes from usual care alone with those from usual care plus the new program...
September 20, 2016: International Journal of Nursing Studies
Susan Mcinnes, Kath Peters, Andrew Bonney, Elizabeth Halcomb
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the nature of collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners in Australian general practice. BACKGROUND: There is international recognition that collaboration between health professionals can improve care coordination, enhance health outcomes, optimise the work environment and reduce healthcare costs. However, effective collaboration requires a clear understanding of each team member's role. DESIGN: A qualitative approach guided by Naturalistic Inquiry was used to elicit and interpret participant narratives...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Laura Anne Brooks, Elizabeth Manias, Patricia Nicholson
BACKGROUND: Patients admitted to Australian intensive care units are often critically unwell, and present the challenge of increasing mortality due to an ageing population. Several of these patients have terminal conditions, requiring withdrawal of active treatment and commencement of end-of-life (EOL) care. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to explore the perspectives and experiences of physicians and nurses providing EOL care in the ICU. In particular, perceived barriers, enablers and challenges to providing EOL care were examined...
September 20, 2016: Australian Critical Care: Official Journal of the Confederation of Australian Critical Care Nurses
Shona Nicole Dutton, Sarah May Dennis, Nicholas Zwar, Mark Fort Harris
BACKGROUND: There are a substantial number of instruments for primary-care clinicians to assess physical-activity (PA). However, there are few studies that have explored the views of clinicians regarding comparative acceptability and ease of use. A better understanding of how clinicians perceive instruments could help overcome barriers, and inform future interventions. This study explored the acceptability of five PA-assessment instruments amongst a sample of Australian primary-care clinicians, including family-physicians (FP) and practice-nurses (PN)...
2016: BMC Family Practice
Kerrie Doyle, Michelle Cleary, Kim Usher, Catherine Hungerford
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Julie Ann Cogin, Ju Li Ng, Ilro Lee
BACKGROUND: We assess how human resource management (HRM) is implemented in Australian hospitals. Drawing on role theory, we consider the influence HRM has on job attitudes of healthcare staff and hospital operational efficiency. METHODS: We adopt a qualitative research design across professional groups (physicians, nurses, and allied health staff) at multiple levels (executive, healthcare managers, and employee). A total of 34 interviews were carried out and analyzed using NVivo...
2016: Human Resources for Health
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