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cell processing

Marlen Vitales-Noyola, Rita Martínez-Martínez, Juan P Loyola-Rodríguez, Lourdes Baranda, Perla Niño-Moreno, Roberto González-Amaro
BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease is chronic inflammatory process that affects the attachment structures of the teeth and constitutes a significant cause of tooth loss in adults. Although different bacteria play an important role in the triggering of this condition, the progression and severity of the disease are strongly affected by the host immune response, which is under the control of different immune-regulatory mechanisms, including T regulatory (Treg) cells. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and function of CD69(+) Treg lymphocytes in patients with chronic periodontal disease...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine
Sharon L I Wong, Maria B Sukkar
Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular protein which regulates interactions between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), and thus governs fundamental cellular functions such as cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. SPARC also regulates the expression and activity of numerous growth factors and matrix metalloproteinases essential for ECM degradation and turnover. Studies in SPARC-null mice have revealed a critical role for SPARC in tissue development, injury and repair, and in the regulation of the immune response...
October 19, 2016: British Journal of Pharmacology
Jian Zhang, Guixin Chou, Zhijun Liu, Mei Liu
AIM: To examine if rubusoside (RUB) can overcome insolubility of betulonic acid (BEA), it can be accurately evaluated for its intrinsic activity against cancer in cell culture and in tumor animal models. MATERIALS & METHODS: By processing RUB and BEA together using a solvent evaporation method, a joint nanoparticulate structure is formed, designated as BEA-NP. RESULTS: BEA-NP was found over three-times more permeable than that solubilized by DMSO in Caco-2 cell monocultures...
October 19, 2016: Nanomedicine
Kelsey E Smith, Jeffrey Schatz
Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk for working memory deficits due to multiple disease processes. We assessed working memory abilities and related functions in 32 school-age children with SCD and 85 matched comparison children using Baddeley's working memory model as a framework. Children with SCD performed worse than controls for working memory, central executive function, and processing/rehearsal speed. Central executive function was found to mediate the relationship between SCD status and working memory, but processing speed did not...
October 19, 2016: Developmental Neuropsychology
F Femiano, R Femiano, L Femiano, A Jamilian, R Rullo, L Perillo
AIM: This review aims to summarise our understanding of the destructive role of acid environment and metalloproteinases in dentin caries progression using a review process. METHOD: The acids resulting from consumption of sugars by acidogenic and aciduric bacteria can cause demineralisation of the tooth surface, but are not able to cause caries-like lesions. The appearance of such lesions requires the activation of enzymatic proteolysis in an acidic environment for degradation of the dentin organic matrix, leading to cavity formation...
September 2016: European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry: Official Journal of European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry
Laura Mecozzi, Oriella Gennari, Romina Rega, Luigi Battista, Pietro Ferraro, Simonetta Grilli
A simple and rapid process for multiscale printing of bioinks with dot widths ranging from hundreds of microns down to 0.5 μm is presented. The process makes use of spontaneous surface charges generated pyroelectrically that are able to draw little daughter droplets directly from the free meniscus of a mother drop through jetting ("p-jet"), thus avoiding time-consuming and expensive fabrication of microstructured nozzles. Multiscale can be easily achieved by modulating the parameters of the p-jet process. Here, it is shown that the p-jet allows us to print well-defined adhesion islands where NIH-3T3 fibroblasts are constrained to live into cluster configurations ranging from 20 down to single cell level...
October 19, 2016: Macromolecular Bioscience
Marika Rai, David Spratt, Paola R Gomez-Pereira, Jay Patel, Sean P Nair
Oral malodour is a common condition which affects a large proportion of the population, resulting in social, emotional and psychological stress. Certain oral bacteria form a coating called a biofilm on the tongue dorsum and degrade organic compounds releasing volatile sulfur compounds that are malodourous. Current chemical treatments for oral malodour such as mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine or essential oils, are not sufficiently effective at reducing the bacterial load on the tongue. One potential alternative to current chemical treatments for oral malodour is the use of light activated antimicrobial agents (LAAAs), which display no toxicity or antimicrobial activity in the dark, but when exposed to light of a specific wavelength produce reactive oxygen species which induce damage to target cells in a process known as photodynamic inactivation...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Breath Research
Atanu Jana, Masatoshi Ishida, Jung Su Park, Steffen Bähring, Jan O Jeppesen, Jonathan L Sessler
After the epochal discovery of the "organic metal", namely, tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-7,7,8,8-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) dyad in 1973, scientists have made efforts to derivatize TTF for constructing various supramolecular architectures to control the charge-transfer processes by adjusting the donor-acceptor strength of the dyads for numerous applications. The interesting inherent electronic donor properties of TTFs control the overall electrochemical properties of the supramolecular structures, leading to the construction of highly efficient optoelectronic materials, photovoltaic solar cells, organic field-effect transistors, and optical sensors...
October 18, 2016: Chemical Reviews
Thomas Sannicolo, Mélanie Lagrange, Anthony Cabos, Caroline Celle, Jean-Pierre Simonato, Daniel Bellet
Transparent electrodes attract intense attention in many technological fields, including optoelectronic devices, transparent film heaters and electromagnetic applications. New generation transparent electrodes are expected to have three main physical properties: high electrical conductivity, high transparency and mechanical flexibility. The most efficient and widely used transparent conducting material is currently indium tin oxide (ITO). However the scarcity of indium associated with ITO's lack of flexibility and the relatively high manufacturing costs have a prompted search into alternative materials...
October 18, 2016: Small
Katya Zelentsova, Ziv Talmi, Ghada Abboud-Jarrous, Tamar Sapir, Tal Capucha, Maria Nassar, Tal Burstyn-Cohen
Neurons are continuously produced in brains of adult mammalian organisms throughout life - a process tightly regulated to ensure a balanced homeostasis. In the adult brain, quiescent Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) residing in distinct niches engage in proliferation, to self-renew and to give rise to differentiated neurons and astrocytes. The mechanisms governing the intricate regulation of NSC quiescence and neuronal differentiation are not completely understood. Here, we report the expression of Protein S (PROS1) in adult NSCs, and show that genetic ablation of Pros1 in neural progenitors increased hippocampal NSC proliferation by 47%...
October 18, 2016: Stem Cells
M Asunción Barreda-Manso, Natalia Yanguas-Casás, Manuel Nieto-Sampedro, Lorenzo Romero-Ramírez
Following a central nervous system (CNS) injury, restoration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity is essential for recovering homeostasis. When this process is delayed or impeded, blood substances and cells enter the CNS parenchyma, initiating an additional inflammatory process that extends the initial injury and causes so-called secondary neuronal loss. Astrocytes and profibrotic mesenchymal cells react to the injury and migrate to the lesion site, creating a new glia limitans that restores the BBB. This process is beneficial for the resolution of the inflammation, neuronal survival and the initiation of the healing process...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Cellular Physiology
Dagmar Schmitz
Since cell-free DNA (cfDNA) fragments of placental origin can be isolated and analyzed from the blood of pregnant women. Applications of this finding have been developed and implemented in clinical care pathways worldwide at an unprecedented pace and manner. Implementation patterns, however, exhibit considerable insufficiencies. Different "motors" of implementation processes, like the market or various regulatory institutions, can be identified at a national level. Each "motor" entails characteristic ethical challenges which are exemplified impressively by a rising number of case reports...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Vipulkumar Patel, Peter Celec, Magdalena Grunt, Heidi Schwarzenbach, Ingo Jenneckens, Timo Hillebrand
Circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) is a promising diagnostic tool and its size fractionation is of interest. However, kits for isolation of ccfDNA available on the market are designed for small volumes hence processing large sample volumes is laborious. We have tested a new method that enables enrichment of ccfDNA from large volumes of plasma and subsequently allows size-fractionation of isolated ccfDNA into two fractions with individually established cut-off levels of ccfDNA length. This method allows isolation of low-abundant DNA as well as separation of long and short DNA molecules...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Abel Jacobus Bronkhorst, Janine Aucamp, Piet J Pretorius
In recent years, cell-free DNA (cfDNA) analysis has received increasing amounts of attention as a potential non-invasive screening tool for the early detection of genetic aberrations and a wide variety of diseases, especially cancer. However, except for some prenatal tests and BEAMing, a technique used to detect mutations in various genes of cancer patients, cfDNA analysis is not yet routinely applied in clinical practice. Although some confusing biological factors inherent to the in vivo setting play a key part, it is becoming increasingly clear that this struggle is mainly due to the lack of an analytical consensus, especially as regards quantitative analyses of cfDNA...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Fiona Taylor, James Bradford, Penella J Woll, Dawn Teare, Angela Cox
Molecular profiling using low coverage whole genome sequencing of cell free DNA (cfDNA) represents a non-targeted approach to identify multiple somatic copy number alterations (SCNA) across different lung cancer subtypes. We aim to establish that SCNA can be detected in cfDNA of lung cancer cases.Standard protocols were followed to process matched cfDNA, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumour and lymphocyte DNA. Copy number profiles for cfDNA or FFPE DNA were normalised to profiles from matched lymphocyte DNA with the software CNAnorm...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Irina A Tikhonova, Martin W Hoyle, Tristan M Snowsill, Chris Cooper, Joanna L Varley-Campbell, Claudius E Rudin, Ruben E Mujica Mota
The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of azacitidine (Celgene) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of this drug for the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia with more than 30 % bone marrow blasts in adults who are not eligible for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as part of the NICE's Single Technology Appraisal process. The Peninsula Technology Assessment Group was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence contained within the company's submission to NICE...
October 17, 2016: PharmacoEconomics
Zhen-Yao Chen, Xin Chen, Zhao-Xia Wang
MicroRNAs are a large group of non-coding RNAs that have emerged as regulators of various biological processes, especially carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Recent evidence has shown that microRNA-196a (miR-196a) is upregulated in most types of tumors and involved in multiple biological processes via translational inhibition and mRNA cleavage, such as cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, mostly functioning as an oncogene. Dysregulation of miR-196a promotes oncogenesis and tumor progression. In this review, we summarize the upstream regulators, target genes, signaling pathways, and single nucleotide polymorphisms of miR-196a, which collectively affect cell proliferation, migration, and invasion...
October 18, 2016: Tumour Biology: the Journal of the International Society for Oncodevelopmental Biology and Medicine
Mateusz Adamiak, Ahmed Abdelbaset-Ismail, Joseph B Moore, J Zhao, Ahmed Abdel-Latif, Marcin Wysoczynski, Mariusz Z Ratajczak
Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous free radical molecule involved in several biological processes related to inflammation, tissue damage, and infections. Based on reports that NO inhibits migration of granulocytes and monocytes, we became interested in the role of inducible NO synthetase (iNOS) in pharmacological mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow (BM) into peripheral blood (PB). To address the role of NO in HSPC trafficking, we upregulated or downregulated iNOS expression in hematopoietic cell lines...
October 17, 2016: Stem Cell Reviews
Alondra Escudero-Castellanos, Blanca E Ocampo-García, Ma Victoria Domínguez-García, Jaime Flores-Estrada, Miriam V Flores-Merino
Hydrogels are suitable materials to promote cell proliferation and tissue support because of their hydrophilic nature, porous structure and sticky properties. However, hydrogel synthesis involves the addition of additives that can increase the risk of inducing cytotoxicity. Sterilization is a critical process for hydrogel clinical use as a proper scaffold for tissue engineering. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(ethylene glycol)-chitosan (PEG-CH) and multi-arm PEG hydrogels were synthesized by free radical polymerization and sterilized by gamma irradiation or disinfected using 70 % ethanol...
December 2016: Journal of Materials Science. Materials in Medicine
Jonas Magno Santos Cesário, Rodrigo Barbosa Oliveira Brito, Camila Soares Malta, Chrisna Souza Silva, Yves Silva Teles Matos, Tânia Cristina Macedo Kunz, Jessica Julioti Urbano, Luis Vicente Franco Oliveira, Maria Aparecida Dalboni, Humberto Dellê
Angiogenesis is an essential process for the establishment, development, and dissemination of several malignant tumors including bladder cancer. The hypoxic condition promotes the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), which translocates to the nucleus to mediate angiogenic factors including the vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A). AnaeroGen system was developed for microbiology area to create a low oxygen tension required to the growth of anaerobic bacteria. Here, we hypothesized the use of AnaeroGen system to induce hypoxia in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells, in order to promote the overexpression of VEGF-A...
October 17, 2016: In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Animal
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