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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433748/the-repertoire-of-epithelial-morphogenesis-on-display-progressive-elaboration-of-drosophila-egg-structure
#1
REVIEW
Juan Carlos Duhart, Travis T Parsons, Laurel A Raftery
Epithelial structures are foundational for tissue organization in all metazoans. Sheets of epithelial cells form lateral adhesive junctions and acquire apico-basal polarity perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Genetic analyses in the insect model, Drosophila melanogaster, have greatly advanced our understanding of how epithelial organization is established, and how it is modulated during tissue morphogenesis. Major insights into collective cell migrations have come from analyses of morphogenetic movements within the adult follicular epithelium that cooperates with female germ cells to build a mature egg...
April 19, 2017: Mechanisms of Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432834/molecular-control-of-gut-formation-in-the-spider-parasteatoda-tepidariorum
#2
Natália Martins Feitosa, Matthias Pechmann, Evelyn E Schwager, Vitória Tobias-Santos, Alistair P McGregor, Wim G M Damen, Rodrigo Nunes da Fonseca
The development of a digestive system is an essential feature of bilaterians. Studies of the molecular control of gut formation in arthropods have been studied in detail in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, little is known in other arthropods, especially in noninsect arthropods. To better understand the evolution of arthropod alimentary system, we investigate the molecular control of gut development in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum (Pt), the primary chelicerate model species for developmental studies...
April 22, 2017: Genesis: the Journal of Genetics and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432831/oncopeltus-fasciatus-as-an-evo-devo-research-organism
#3
REVIEW
Ariel D Chipman
The large milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus was one of the main study insects for a range of biological questions throughout much of the 20(th) century. Its importance waned with the introduction of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism. The evo-devo revolution of the turn of the century re-introduced Oncopeltus into the scientific community, and it has proved increasingly useful, mostly within a comparative context for evolution driven research. The last few years have seen a number of significant contributions to our understanding of the evolution of developmental processes in insects, and in arthropods in general, arise from work on Oncopeltus...
April 22, 2017: Genesis: the Journal of Genetics and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432826/ploidy-has-little-effect-on-timing-early-embryonic-events-in-the-haplo-diploid-wasp-nasonia
#4
Deanna Arsala, Jeremy A Lynch
The nucleocytoplasmic (N/C) ratio plays a prominent role in the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) in many animals. The effect of the N/C ratio on cell-cycle lengthening and zygotic genome activation (ZGA) has been studied extensively in Drosophila, where haploid embryos experience an additional division prior to completing cellularization and triploid embryos cellularize precociously by one division. In this study, we set out to understand how the obligate difference in ploidy in the haplodiploid wasp, Nasonia, affects the MZT and which aspects of the Drosophila MZT are conserved...
April 22, 2017: Genesis: the Journal of Genetics and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432817/factors-involved-in-early-polarization-of-the-anterior-posterior-axis-in-the-milkweed-bug-oncopeltus-fasciatus
#5
Neta Ginzburg, Mira Cohen, Ariel D Chipman
The axes of insect embryos are defined early in the blastoderm stage. Genes involved in this polarization are well known in Drosophila, but less so in other insects, such as the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus. Using quantitative PCR, we looked at differential expression of several candidate genes for early anterior-posterior patterning and found that none of them are expressed asymmetrically in the early blastoderm. We then used an RNA-Seq approach to identify novel candidate genes that might be involved in early polarization in Oncopeltus...
April 22, 2017: Genesis: the Journal of Genetics and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432809/the-honeybee-as-a-model-insect-for-developmental-genetics
#6
REVIEW
A G Cridge, M R Lovegrove, J G Skelly, S E Taylor, G E L Petersen, R C Cameron, P K Dearden
Honeybees are an important component of modern agricultural systems, and a fascinating and scientifically engrossing insect. Honeybees are not commonly used as model systems for understanding development in insects despite their importance in agriculture. Honeybee embryogenesis, while being superficially similar to Drosophila, is molecularly very different, especially in axis formation and sex determination. In later development, much of honeybee biology is modified by caste development, an as yet poorly understood, but excellent, system to study developmental plasticity...
April 22, 2017: Genesis: the Journal of Genetics and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432786/the-comprehensive-connectome-of-a-neural-substrate-for-on-motion-detection-in-drosophila
#7
Shin-Ya Takemura, Aljoscha Nern, Dmitri B Chklovskii, Louis K Scheffer, Gerald M Rubin, Ian A Meinertzhagen
Analysing computations in neural circuits often uses simplified models because the actual neuronal implementation is not known. For example, a problem in vision, how the eye detects image motion, has long been analysed using Hassenstein-Reichardt (HR) detector or Barlow-Levick (BL) models. These both simulate motion detection well, but the exact neuronal circuits undertaking these tasks remain elusive. We reconstructed a comprehensive connectome of the circuits of Drosophila's motion-sensing T4 cells using a novel EM technique...
April 22, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432706/varied-pathological-and-therapeutic-response-effects-associated-with-chchd2-mutant-and-risk-variants
#8
Murni Tio, Rujing Wen, Yih Lin Lim, Zul Haikhel Bin Zukifli, Shaoping Xie, Patrick Ho, Zhidong Zhou, Tong-Wey Koh, Yi Zhao, Eng-King Tan
Mutations and polymorphic risk variant of coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain containing 2 (CHCHD2) have been associated with late-onset Parkinson disease. In vivo pathological evidence of CHCHD2 mutations is currently lacking. Utilizing transgenic Drosophila model, we examined the relative pathophysiologic effect of the pathogenic (c.182C>T, p.Thr61Ile and c.434G>A, p.Arg145Gln) and the risk (c.5C>T, p.Pro2Leu) CHCHD2 variants. All the transgenic models exhibited locomotor dysfunction which could be exacerbated by rotenone exposure, dopaminergic neuron degeneration, reduction in lifespan, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and impairment in synaptic transmission...
April 21, 2017: Human Mutation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432215/actomyosin-based-tissue-folding-requires-a-multicellular-myosin-gradient
#9
Natalie C Heer, Pearson W Miller, Soline Chanet, Norbert Stoop, Jörn Dunkel, Adam C Martin
Tissue folding promotes three-dimensional (3D) form during development. In many cases, folding is associated with myosin accumulation at the apical surface of epithelial cells, as seen in the vertebrate neural tube and the Drosophila ventral furrow. This type of folding is characterized by constriction of apical cell surfaces, and the resulting cell shape change is thought to cause tissue folding. Here, we use quantitative microscopy to measure the pattern of transcription, signaling, myosin activation, and cell shape in the Drosophila mesoderm...
April 21, 2017: Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432181/dual-nature-of-pseudouridylation-in-u2-snrna-pus1p-dependent-and-pus1p-independent-activities-in-yeasts-and-higher-eukaryotes
#10
Svetlana Deryusheva, Joseph G Gall
The pseudouridine at position 43 in vertebrate U2 snRNA is one of the most conserved posttranscriptional modifications of spliceosomal snRNAs; the equivalent position is pseudouridylated in U2 snRNAs in different phyla including fungi, insects, and worms. Pseudouridine synthase Pus1p acts alone on U2 snRNA to form this pseudouridine in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mouse. Furthermore, in S. cerevisiae Pus1p is the only pseudouridine synthase for this position. Using an in vivo yeast cell system we tested enzymatic activity of Pus1p from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the frog Xenopus tropicalis...
April 21, 2017: RNA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432141/the-spacing-effect-for-structural-synaptic-plasticity-provides-specificity-and-precision-in-plastic-changes
#11
Martin A San, L Rela, B D Gelb, M R Pagani
In contrast to trials of training without intervals (massed training), training trials spaced over time (spaced training) induce a more persistent memory identified as long-term memory (LTM). This phenomenon known as "the spacing effect for memory" is poorly understood. LTM is supported by structural synaptic plasticity; however, how synapses integrate spaced stimuli remains elusive. Here, we analyzed events of structural synaptic plasticity at the single synapse level after distinct patterns of stimulation in motoneurons of Drosophila We found that the spacing effect is a phenomenon detected at synaptic level, which determine the specificity and the precision in structural synaptic plasticity...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432135/molecular-mechanisms-of-sleep-homeostasis-in-flies-and-mammals
#12
Ravi Allada, Chiara Cirelli, Amita Sehgal
Sleep is homeostatically regulated with sleep pressure accumulating with the increasing duration of prior wakefulness. Yet, a clear understanding of the molecular components of the homeostat, as well as the molecular and cellular processes they sense and control to regulate sleep intensity and duration, remain a mystery. Here, we will discuss the cellular and molecular basis of sleep homeostasis, first focusing on the best homeostatic sleep marker in vertebrates, slow wave activity; second, moving to the molecular genetic analysis of sleep homeostasis in the fruit fly Drosophila; and, finally, discussing more systemic aspects of sleep homeostasis...
April 21, 2017: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431021/patterns-of-genome-wide-diversity-and-population-structure-in-the-drosophila-athabasca-species-complex
#13
Karen M Wong Miller, Ryan R Bracewell, Michael B Eisen, Doris Bachtrog
The Drosophila athabasca species complex contains three recently diverged, prezygotically isolated semispecies (Western-Northern, Eastern-A, and Eastern-B) that are distributed across North America and share zones of sympatry. Inferences based on a handful of loci suggest that this complex might be an ideal system for studying the genetics of incipient speciation and the evolution of prezygotic isolating mechanisms, but patterns of differentiation have not been characterized systematically. Here, we assembled a draft genome for D...
April 14, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430993/a-multi-systemic-mitochondrial-disorder-due-to-a-dominant-p-y955h-disease-variant-in-dna-polymerase-gamma
#14
Triinu Siibak, Paula Clemente, Ana Bratic, Helene Bruhn, Timo E S Kauppila, Bertil Macao, Florian A Schober, Nicole Lesko, Rolf Wibom, Karin Naess, Inger Nennesmo, Anna Wedell, Bradley Peter, Christoph Freyer, Maria Falkenberg, Anna Wredenberg
Mutations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, POLG, are associated with a variety of clinical presentations, ranging from early onset fatal brain disease in Alpers syndrome to chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. The majority of mutations are linked with disturbances of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) integrity and maintenance. On a molecular level, depending on their location within the enzyme, mutations either lead to mtDNA depletion or the accumulation of multiple mtDNA deletions, and in some cases these molecular changes can be correlated to the clinical presentation...
April 17, 2017: Human Molecular Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430886/intrinsic-protein-disorder-reduces-small-scale-gene-duplicability
#15
Sanghita Banerjee, Felix Feyertag, David Alvarez-Ponce
Whereas the rate of gene duplication is relatively high, only certain duplications survive the filter of natural selection and can contribute to genome evolution. However, the reasons why certain genes can be retained after duplication whereas others cannot remain largely unknown. Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), whose structures fluctuate between alternative conformational states. Due to their high flexibility, IDRs often enable protein-protein interactions and are the target of post-translational modifications...
April 19, 2017: DNA Research: An International Journal for Rapid Publication of Reports on Genes and Genomes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430154/circadian-rhythm-neuropeptides-in-drosophila-signals-for-normal-circadian-function-and-circadian-neurodegenerative-disease
#16
REVIEW
Qiankun He, Binbin Wu, Jeffrey L Price, Zhangwu Zhao
Circadian rhythm is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many organisms ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. During more than four decades, the intrinsic and exogenous regulations of circadian rhythm have been studied. This review summarizes the core endogenous oscillation in Drosophila and then focuses on the neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and hormones that mediate its outputs and integration in Drosophila and the links between several of these (pigment dispersing factor (PDF) and insulin-like peptides) and neurodegenerative disease...
April 21, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429234/neuron-to-neuron-transfer-of-fus-in-drosophila-primary-neuronal-culture-is-enhanced-by-als-associated-mutations
#17
Sébastien Feuillette, Morgane Delarue, Gaëtan Riou, Anne-Lise Gaffuri, Jane Wu, Zsolt Lenkei, Olivier Boyer, Thierry Frébourg, Dominique Campion, Magalie Lecourtois
The DNA- and RNA-binding protein fused in sarcoma (FUS) has been pathologically and genetically linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Cytoplasmic FUS-positive inclusions were identified in the brain and spinal cord of a subset of patients suffering with ALS/FTLD. An increasing number of reports suggest that FUS protein can behave in a prion-like manner. However, no neuropathological studies or experimental data were available regarding cell-to-cell spread of these pathological protein assemblies...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: MN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28428935/genetic-analysis-of-mosquito-detection-of-humans
#18
Joshua I Raji, Matthew DeGennaro
Mosquitoes detect the presence of humans by integrating chemosensory, thermal, and visual cues. Among these, odors are crucial for mosquito host detection. Insects have evolved a diverse repertoire of receptors to detect their plant and animal hosts. Genetic analysis of these receptors in Drosophila has set the stage for similar studies in mosquitoes. The diversity of the cues involved in mosquito host-seeking has made designing behavioral control strategies a challenge. The sensory receptors that are most important for mosquito detection of humans can now be determined using genome editing...
April 2017: Current Opinion in Insect Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28428862/environmental-heterogeneity-does-not-affect-levels-of-phenotypic-plasticity-in-natural-populations-of-three-drosophila-species
#19
Tommaso Manenti, Jesper G Sørensen, Volker Loeschcke
Adaptation of natural populations to variable environmental conditions may occur by changes in trait means and/or in the levels of plasticity. Theory predicts that environmental heterogeneity favors plasticity of adaptive traits. Here we investigated the performance in several traits of three sympatric Drosophila species freshly collected in two environments that differ in the heterogeneity of environmental conditions. Differences in trait means within species were found in several traits, indicating that populations differed in their evolutionary response to the environmental conditions of their origin...
April 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28428611/transcription-factor-antagonism-controls-enteroendocrine-cell-specification-from-intestinal-stem-cells
#20
Yumei Li, Zhimin Pang, Huanwei Huang, Chenhui Wang, Tao Cai, Rongwen Xi
The balanced maintenance and differentiation of local stem cells is required for Homeostatic renewal of tissues. In the Drosophila midgut, the transcription factor Escargot (Esg) maintains undifferentiated states in intestinal stem cells, whereas the transcription factors Scute (Sc) and Prospero (Pros) promote enteroendocrine cell specification. However, the mechanism through which Esg and Sc/Pros coordinately regulate stem cell differentiation is unknown. Here, by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis with genetic studies, we show that both Esg and Sc bind to a common promoter region of pros...
April 20, 2017: Scientific Reports
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