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HIV latency reactivation

Timsy Uppal, Roni Sarkar, Ranjit Dhelaria, Subhash C Verma
Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus or Human herpesvirus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8), an oncogenic human herpesvirus and the leading cause of cancer in HIV-infected individuals, is a major public health concern with recurring reports of epidemics on a global level. The early detection of KSHV virus and subsequent activation of the antiviral immune response by the host's immune system are crucial to prevent KSHV infection. The host's immune system is an evolutionary conserved system that provides the most important line of defense against invading microbial pathogens, including viruses...
March 20, 2018: Cancers
Li Huang, Wei-Hong Lai, Lei Zhu, Wei Li, Lei Wei, Kuo-Hsiung Lee, Lan Xie, Chin-Ho Chen
We have previously reported gnidimacrin (GM), a protein kinase C (PKC) agonist, significantly reduces the frequency of HIV-1 latently infected cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients undergoing successful antiretroviral therapy at low picomolar concentrations ex vivo , which is distinct from other latency reversing agents. In this study, we demonstrate that strong viral reactivation by GM is a mechanism for elimination of latently infected cells, and a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), a thiophenyl benzamide (TPB), further potentiated the efficacy of GM against latent HIV-1...
March 8, 2018: ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters
Jeffy George, Joseph J Mattapallil
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) establishes life-long latency in infected individuals. Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had a significant impact on the course of HIV infection leading to a better long-term outcome, the pool of latent reservoir remains substantial even under HAART. Numerous approaches have been under development with the goal of eradicating the latent HIV reservoir though with limited success. Approaches that combine immune-mediated control of HIV to activate both the innate and the adaptive immune system under suppressive therapy along with "shock and kill" drugs may lead to a better control of the reactivated virus...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Mirosława Panasiuk, Michał Rychłowski, Natalia Derewońko, Krystyna Bieńkowska-Szewczyk
Various types of intercellular connections that are essential for communication between cells are often utilized by pathogens. Recently, a new type of cellular connection, long, thin, actin-rich membrane extensions named tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), have been shown to play an important role in cell-to-cell spread of HIV and influenza virus. In the present report, we show that TNTs are frequently formed by cells infected by an alpha-herpesvirus BoHV-1 (bovine herpesvirus 1). Viral proteins, such as envelope glycoprotein gE, capsid protein VP26 and tegument protein Us3, as well as cellular organelles (mitochondria) were detected by immunofluorescence and live cell imaging of nanotubes formed by bovine primary fibroblasts and oropharynx cells (KOP)...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Virology
Chen Huan, Zhaolong Li, Shanshan Ning, Hong Wang, Xiao-Fang Yu, Wenyan Zhang
The HIV-1 reservoir is a major obstacle to complete eradication of the virus. Although many proteins and RNAs have been characterized as regulators in HIV-1/AIDS pathogenesis and latency, only a few long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to be closely associated with HIV-1 replication and latency. Here, we demonstrated that lncRNA uc002yug.2 plays a key role in HIV-1 viral replication and latency. uc002yug.2 potentially enhances HIV-1 viral replication, LTR activity as well as the activation of latent HIV-1 in both cell lines and CD4+ T cells from patients...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Virology
Jin Gohda, Kazuo Suzuki, Kai Liu, Xialin Xie, Hiroaki Takeuchi, Jun-Ichiro Inoue, Yasushi Kawaguchi, Takaomi Ishida
HIV-1 latent reservoirs harbouring silenced but replication-competent proviruses are a major obstacle against viral eradication in infected patients. The "shock and kill" strategy aims to reactivate latent provirus with latency reversing agents (LRAs) in the presence of antiretroviral drugs, necessitating the development of effective and efficient LRAs. We screened a chemical library for potential LRAs and identified two dual Polo-like kinase (PLK)/bromodomain inhibitors, BI-2536 and BI-6727 (volasertib), which are currently undergoing clinical trials against various cancers...
February 23, 2018: Scientific Reports
Corinne Barat, Alizé Proust, Alexandre Deshiere, Mathieu Leboeuf, Jean Drouin, Michel J Tremblay
The "shock and kill" HIV-1 cure strategy proposes eradication of stable cellular reservoirs by clinical treatment with latency-reversing agents (LRAs). Although resting CD4+ T cells latently infected with HIV-1 constitute the main reservoir that is targeted by these approaches, their consequences on other reservoirs such as the central nervous system are still unknown and should be taken into consideration. We performed experiments aimed at defining the possible role of astrocytes in HIV-1 persistence in the brain and the effect of LRA treatments on this viral sanctuary...
February 21, 2018: Glia
Guochun Jiang, Don Nguyen, Nancie M Archin, Steven A Yukl, Gema Méndez-Lagares, Yuyang Tang, Maher M Elsheikh, George R Thompson, Dennis J Hartigan-O'Connor, David M Margolis, Joseph K Wong, Satya Dandekar
Eradication of HIV-1 (HIV) is hindered by stable viral reservoirs. Viral latency is epigenetically regulated. While the effects of histone acetylation and methylation at the HIV long-terminal repeat (LTR) have been described, our knowledge of the proviral epigenetic landscape is incomplete. We report that a previously unrecognized epigenetic modification of the HIV LTR, histone crotonylation, is a regulator of HIV latency. Reactivation of latent HIV was achieved following the induction of histone crotonylation through increased expression of the crotonyl-CoA-producing enzyme acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (ACSS2)...
February 19, 2018: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Vipul Gupta, Narendra M Dixit
Eradicating HIV-1 infection is difficult because of the reservoir of latently infected cells that gets established soon after infection, remains hidden from antiretroviral drugs and host immune responses, and retains the capacity to reignite infection following the cessation of treatment. Drugs called latency-reversing agents (LRAs) are being developed to reactivate latently infected cells and render them susceptible to viral cytopathicity or immune killing. Whereas individual LRAs have failed to induce adequate reactivation, pairs of LRAs have been identified recently that act synergistically and hugely increase reactivation levels compared to individual LRAs...
February 16, 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
Nadia Madrid-Elena, María Laura García-Bermejo, Sergio Serrano-Villar, Alberto Díaz-de Santiago, Beatriz Sastre, Carolina Gutiérrez, Fernando Dronda, María Coronel Díaz, Ester Domínguez, María Rosa López-Huertas, Beatriz Hernández-Novoa, Santiago Moreno
Maraviroc is a CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. We and others have suggested that maraviroc could reactivate latent HIV-1. To test the latency reversing potential of maraviroc and the mechanisms involved, we performed a phase-II, single-center, open-label study in which maraviroc was administered for 10 days to 20 HIV-1-infected individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (Eudra CT: 2012-003215-66). All patients completed full maraviroc dosing and follow up. The primary endpoint was to study whether maraviroc may reactivate HIV-1 latency, eliciting signalling pathways involved in the viral reactivation...
February 14, 2018: Journal of Virology
Sheraz Khan, Mazhar Iqbal, Muhammad Tariq, Shahid M Baig, Wasim Abbas
HIV-1 latency allows the virus to persist until reactivation, in a transcriptionally silent form in its cellular reservoirs despite the presence of effective cART. Such viral persistence represents a major barrier to HIV eradication since treatment interruption leads to rebound plasma viremia. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have recently got a considerable attention in regulating HIV-1 post-integration latency as they are involved in the repression of proviral gene expression through the methylation of histones...
2018: Clinical Epigenetics
Marcelo J Kuroda, Chie Sugimoto, Yanhui Cai, Kristen M Merino, Smriti Mehra, Mariluz Araínga, Chad J Roy, Cecily C Midkiff, Xavier Alvarez, Elizabeth S Didier, Deepak Kaushal
Background: Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) profoundly affect the immune system and synergistically accelerate disease progression. It is believed that CD4+ T-cell depletion by HIV is the major cause of immunodeficiency and reactivation of latent TB. Previous studies demonstrated that blood monocyte turnover concurrent with tissue macrophage death from virus infection better predicted AIDS onset than CD4+ T-cell depletion in macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)...
February 8, 2018: Journal of Infectious Diseases
Kiandokht Bashiri, Nima Rezaei, Milena Nasi, Andrea Cossarizza
The definitive cure for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) infection is represented by the eradication of the virus from the patient's body. To reach this result, cells that are infected but do not produce the virus must become recognizable to be killed by the immune system. For this purpose, drugs defined "latency reverting agents" (LRA) that reactivate viral production are under investigation. A few clinical studies have been performed in HIV-infected patients treated with LRA and combined antiretroviral therapy (cART)...
February 7, 2018: Immunology Letters
Amy E Baxter, Una O'Doherty, Daniel E Kaufmann
Recent years have seen a substantial increase in the number of tools available to monitor and study HIV reservoirs. Here, we discuss recent technological advances that enable an understanding of reservoir dynamics beyond classical assays to measure the frequency of cells containing provirus able to propagate a spreading infection (replication-competent reservoir). Specifically, we focus on the characterization of cellular reservoirs containing proviruses able to transcribe viral mRNAs (so called transcription-competent) and translate viral proteins (translation-competent)...
February 2, 2018: Retrovirology
Erik Abner, Mateusz Stoszko, Lei Zeng, Heng-Chang Chen, Andrea Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Tsuyoshi Konuma, Eduard Zorita, Elisa Fanunza, Qiang Zhang, Tokameh Mahmoudi, Ming-Ming Zhou, Guillaume J Filion, Albert Jordan
Upon HIV-1 infection, a reservoir of latently infected resting T cells prevents the eradication of the virus from patients. To achieve complete depletion, the existing virus-suppressing antiretroviral therapy must be combined with drugs that reactivate the dormant viruses. We previously described a novel chemical scaffold compound, MMQO (8-methoxy-6-methylquinolin-4-ol) that is able to reactivate viral transcription in several models of HIV latency including J-Lat cells through an unknown mechanism. MMQO potentiates the activity of known latency-reversing agents (LRAs) or 'shock' drugs such as PKC agonists or HDAC inhibitors...
January 17, 2018: Journal of Virology
Anisha Misra, Emile Gleeson, Weiming Wang, Chaobaihui Ye, Paul Zhou, Jason T Kimata
In previous studies, we demonstrated that single-chain variable fragments (scFv) from anti-HIV Env monoclonal antibodies act as entry inhibitors when tethered to the surface of target cells by a glycosyl-phosphitidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Interestingly, even if a virus escapes inhibition at entry, its replication is ultimately controlled. We hypothesized that in addition to functioning as entry inhibitors, anti-HIV GPI-scFvs may also interact with Env in an infected cell, thereby interfering with infectivity of newly produced virions...
January 10, 2018: Journal of Virology
Carlos Barrionuevo-Cornejo, Daniela Dueñas-Hancco
This article describes the various non-neoplastic lymphadenopathies that occur in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), before or during the stage of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The stages that develop during the HIV infection include: primary infection (acute infection, spread of the virus, development of host immune response, and acute retroviral syndrome), chronic infection or clinical latency, and finally, the AIDS stage. Non-neoplastic lymphadenopathies can occur at any of these phases of the infection and are due to multiple causes that can be divided into infectious causes (bacterial, fungal, parasitic, viral), and reactive causes (persistent generalized lymphadenopathy and a variety of situations that they also occur in immunocompetent people such as Castleman's disease and Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease, among others)...
January 2018: Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology
Pargol Hashemi, Kris Barreto, Wendy Bernhard, Adam Lomness, Nicolette Honson, Tom A Pfeifer, P Richard Harrigan, Ivan Sadowski
Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the outlook for the HIV epidemic, but does not provide a cure. The proposed "shock-and-kill" strategy is directed at inducing latent HIV reservoirs, which may then be purged via boosted immune response or targeting infected cells. We describe five novel compounds that are capable of reversing HIV latency without affecting the general T-cell activation state. The new compounds exhibit synergy for reactivation of latent provirus with other latency-reversing agents (LRAs), in particular ingenol-3-angelate/PEP005...
December 15, 2017: EMBO Molecular Medicine
Alizé Proust, Corinne Barat, Mathieu Leboeuf, Jean Drouin, Michel J Tremblay
BACKGROUND: Despite effectiveness of the combined antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1 persists in long-lived latently infected cells. Consequently, new therapeutic approaches aimed at eliminating this latent reservoir are currently being developed. A "shock and kill" strategy using latency-reversing agents (LRA) to reactivate HIV-1 has been proposed. However, the impact of LRA on the central nervous system (CNS) remains elusive. METHODS: We used human fetal astrocytes and investigated the effects of several LRA on their functional and secretory activities...
December 11, 2017: Journal of Neuroinflammation
Hanyu Pan, Panpan Lu, Yinzhong Shen, Yanan Wang, Zhengtao Jiang, Xinyi Yang, Yangcheng Zhong, He Yang, Inam Ulla Khan, Muya Zhou, Bokang Li, Ziyu Zhang, Jianqing Xu, Hongzhou Lu, Huanzhang Zhu
The long-lived latent HIV-1 reservoir is the major barrier for complete cure of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Here we report that a novel bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) inhibitor bromosporine which can broadly target BETs, is able to potently reactivate HIV-1 replication in different latency models alone and more powerful when combined with prostratin or TNF-α. Furthermore, the treatment with bromosporine induced HIV-1 full-length transcripts in resting CD4+ T cells from infected individuals with suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) ex vivo , with no obvious cytotoxicity or global activation of T cell...
November 7, 2017: Oncotarget
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