keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Deaf

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28241691/-research-progress-of-objective-audiometry-test-in-the-diagnosis-of-occupational-noise-induced-deafness
#1
X C Xu, J X Cao, S F Yu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2016: Chinese Journal of Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28241207/literacy-outcomes-for-primary-school-children-who-are-deaf-and-hard-of-hearing-a-cohort-comparison-study
#2
Margaret Harris, Emmanouela Terlektsi, Fiona E Kyle
Purpose: In this study, we compared the language and literacy of two cohorts of children with severe-profound hearing loss, recruited 10 years apart, to determine if outcomes had improved in line with the introduction of newborn hearing screening and access to improved hearing aid technology. Method: Forty-two children with deafness, aged 5-7 years with a mean unaided loss of 102 DB, were assessed on language, reading, and phonological skills. Their performance was compared with that of a similar group of 32 children with deafness assessed 10 years earlier and also a group of 40 children with normal hearing of similar single word reading ability...
February 22, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28239575/observations-on-tympanic-membrane-perforations-safe-type-and-hearing-loss
#3
Sushil Gaur, O N Sinha, Ashesh Bhushan, Gaurav Batni
The most commonly observed clinical findings in otological practice is discharging ear in which perforation of the tympanic membrane is the commonest, yet the patients hardly ever seek advice for deafness as the presenting symptom. In patients with the symptoms of ear ache or ear discharge when relieved seldom present for follow up and are not very much concerned about the hearing loss present there. There is a different correlation between surface area of tympanic membrane and amplification of sound. Conductive hearing loss is seen in lower tones than higher tones...
March 2017: Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238977/deaf-hearing-research-partnerships
#4
Ju-Lee A Wolsey, Kim Misener Dunn, Scott W Gentzke, Hannah A Joharchi, M Diane Clark
Deaf individuals typically are seen through the lens of the dominant hearing society's perception, i.e., that being deaf is an impairment. Today, a small but growing number of Deaf and hearing researchers are challenging this perception. The authors examined perceptions of what components are necessary for a successful Deaf/hearing research partnership, and propose that it is essential for Deaf and hearing researchers to embrace a Deaf epistemology. The authors found that a core category of equity is the key to effective teams...
2017: American Annals of the Deaf
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238975/written-forms-of-signed-languages-a-route-to-literacy-for-deaf-learners
#5
Connie Mayer
While there have been attempts to develop written systems for signed languages, none have been widely used or adopted. In his article in an American Annals of the Deaf special issue that also includes the present article, Grushkin makes a case not only for why, but how efforts should be renewed to develop a written signed language, suggesting that increased written-English competence will be a consequence of increased competence in written and signed American Sign Language, with literacy-related skills transferring across languages...
2017: American Annals of the Deaf
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238974/why-american-sign-language-gloss-must-matter
#6
Samuel J Supalla, Jody H Cripps, Andrew P Byrne
Responding to an article by Grushkin on how deaf children best learn to read, published, along with the present article, in an American Annals of the Deaf special issue, the authors review American Sign Language gloss. Topics include how ASL gloss enables deaf children to learn to read in their own language and simultaneously experience a transition to written English, and what gloss looks like and how it underlines deaf children's learning and mastery of English literacy through ASL. Rebuttal of Grushkin's argument includes data describing a deaf child's engagement in reading aloud (entirely in ASL) with a gloss text, which occurred without the breakdown implied by Grushkin...
2017: American Annals of the Deaf
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238973/writing-signed-languages-what-for-what-form-a-response
#7
Donald F Moores
In his article in an American Annals of the Deaf special issue that also includes the present article, Grushkin divides his discussion of a written sign system into three basic parts. The first presents arguments against the development of a written form of American Sign Language; the second provides a rationale for a written form of ASL; the third advances opinions of the form such a system might take. The arguments in the first part are weak and reflect the same bias that historically has been shown against ASL itself...
2017: American Annals of the Deaf
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238972/-thinking-for-writing-a-prolegomenon-on-writing-signed-languages
#8
Russell S Rosen, Maria C Hartman, Ye Wang
In his article in this American Annals of the Deaf special issue that also includes the present article, Grushkin argues that the writing difficulties of many deaf and hard of hearing children result primarily from the orthographic nature of the writing system; he proposes a new system based on features found in signed languages. In response, the present authors review the literature on D/HH children's writing difficulties, outline the main percepts of and assumptions about writing signed languages, discuss "thinking-for-writing" as a process in developing writing skills, offer research designs to test the effectiveness of writing signed language systems, and provide strategies for adopting "thinking-for-writing" in education...
2017: American Annals of the Deaf
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229637/a-simple-standard-technique-for-labyrinthectomy-in-the-rat-a-methodical-communication-with-a-detailed-description-of-the-surgical-process
#9
G L Nádasy, G Raffai, E Fehér, G Schaming, E Monos
Aims Labyrinthectomized rats are suitable models to test consequences of vestibular lesion and are widely used to study neural plasticity. We describe a combined microsurgical-chemical technique that can be routinely performed with minimum damage. Methods Caudal leaflet of the parotis is elevated. The tendinous fascia covering the bulla is opened frontally from the sternomastoid muscle's tendon while sparing facial nerve branches. A 4 mm diameter hole is drilled into the bulla's hind lower lateral wall to open the common (in rodents) mastoid-tympanic cavity...
September 2016: Physiol Int
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229314/understanding-etiology-of-hearing-loss-as-a-contributor-to-language-dysfluency-and-its-impact-on-assessment-and-treatment-of-people-who-are-deaf-in-mental-health-settings
#10
Charlene J Crump, Stephen H Hamerdinger
Working with individuals who are deaf in mental health settings can be complex work, necessitating consideration for the difference in language abilities. These differences include not only the language differences of American Sign Language (ASL) and English, but also the range of heterogeneity within the Deaf Community. Multiple influences such as mental illness, medical conditions, language deprivation and the etiology of deafness can impact how a person acquires and uses language. This article will discuss how various causes of deafness create the potential for specific language dysfluencies with individuals who are deaf in mental health settings...
February 22, 2017: Community Mental Health Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28227718/a-home-automation-based-environmental-sound-alert-for-people-experiencing-hearing-loss
#11
Matthias Mielke, Rainer Bruck, Matthias Mielke, Rainer Bruck, Rainer Bruck, Matthias Mielke
Different assistive technologies are available for deaf people (i.e. deaf, deafened, and hard of hearing). Besides the well-known hearing aid, devices for detection of sound events that occur at home or at work (e.g. doorbell, telephone) are available. Despite the technological progress in the last years and resulting new possibilities, the basic functions and concepts of such devices have not changed. The user still needs special assistive technology that is bound to the home or work environment. In this contribution a new concept for awareness of events in buildings is presented...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28227717/audis-wear-a-smartwatch-based-assistive-device-for-ubiquitous-awareness-of-environmental-sounds
#12
Matthias Mielke, Rainer Bruck, Matthias Mielke, Rainer Bruck, Rainer Bruck, Matthias Mielke
A multitude of assistive devices is available for deaf people (i.e. deaf, deafened, and hard of hearing). Besides hearing and communication aids, devices to access environmental sounds are available commercially. But the devices have two major drawbacks: 1. they are targeted at indoor environments (e.g. home or work), and 2. only specific events are supported (e.g. the doorbell or telephone). Recent research shows that important sounds can occur in all contexts and that the interests in sounds are diverse. These drawbacks can be tackled by using modern information and communication technology that enables the development of new and improved assistive devices...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28225973/do-you-know-this-syndrome-leopard-syndrome
#13
Flávio Heleno da Silva Queiroz Cançado, Luis Candido Pinto da Silva, Paulo Franco Taitson, Ana Carolina Dias Viana de Andrade, Matheus Melo Pithon, Dauro Douglas Oliveira
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is known as Leopard syndrome, which is a mnemonic rule for multiple lentigines (L), electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities (E), ocular hypertelorism (O), pulmonary stenosis (P), abnormalities of genitalia (A), retardation of growth (R), and deafness (D). We report the case of a 12-year-old patient with some of the abovementioned characteristics: hypertelorism, macroglossia, lentigines, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, subaortic stenosis, growth retardation, and hearing impairment...
January 2017: Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28225734/auditory-performance-and-electrical-stimulation-measures-in-cochlear-implant-recipients-with-auditory-neuropathy-compared-with-severe-to-profound-sensorineural-hearing-loss
#14
Joseph Attias, Tally Greenstein, Miriam Peled, David Ulanovski, Jay Wohlgelernter, Eyal Raveh
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to compare auditory and speech outcomes and electrical parameters on average 8 years after cochlear implantation between children with isolated auditory neuropathy (AN) and children with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). DESIGN: The study was conducted at a tertiary, university-affiliated pediatric medical center. The cohort included 16 patients with isolated AN with current age of 5 to 12.2 years who had been using a cochlear implant for at least 3...
March 2017: Ear and Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28224991/prevalence-of-congenital-amusia
#15
Isabelle Peretz, Dominique T Vuvan
Congenital amusia (commonly known as tone deafness) is a lifelong musical disorder that affects 4% of the population according to a single estimate based on a single test from 1980. Here we present the first large-based measure of prevalence with a sample of 20 000 participants, which does not rely on self-referral. On the basis of three objective tests and a questionnaire, we show that (a) the prevalence of congenital amusia is only 1.5%, with slightly more females than males, unlike other developmental disorders where males often predominate; (b) self-disclosure is a reliable index of congenital amusia, which suggests that congenital amusia is hereditary, with 46% first-degree relatives similarly affected; (c) the deficit is not attenuated by musical training and (d) it emerges in relative isolation from other cognitive disorder, except for spatial orientation problems...
February 22, 2017: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223951/speechreading-in-deaf-adults-with-cochlear-implants-evidence-for-perceptual-compensation
#16
Hannah Pimperton, Amelia Ralph-Lewis, Mairéad MacSweeney
Previous research has provided evidence for a speechreading advantage in congenitally deaf adults compared to hearing adults. A 'perceptual compensation' account of this finding proposes that prolonged early onset deafness leads to a greater reliance on visual, as opposed to auditory, information when perceiving speech which in turn results in superior visual speech perception skills in deaf adults. In the current study we tested whether previous demonstrations of a speechreading advantage for profoundly congenitally deaf adults with hearing aids, or no amplificiation, were also apparent in adults with the same deafness profile but who have experienced greater access to the auditory elements of speech via a cochlear implant (CI)...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28222800/exome-sequencing-identifies-slc26a4-gjb2-scarb2-and-duox2-mutations-in-2-siblings-with-pendred-syndrome-in-a-malaysian-family
#17
Yock-Ping Chow, Nor Azian Abdul Murad, Zamzureena Mohd Rani, Jia-Shiun Khoo, Pei-Sin Chong, Loo-Ling Wu, Rahman Jamal
BACKGROUND: Pendred syndrome (PDS, MIM #274600) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss and goiter. In this study, we describing the possible PDS causal mutations in a Malaysian family with 2 daughters diagnosed with bilateral hearing loss and hypothyroidism. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole exome sequencing was performed on 2 sisters with PDS and their unaffected parents. Our results showed that both sisters inherited monoallelic mutations in the 2 known PDS genes, SLC26A4 (ENST00000265715:c...
February 21, 2017: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28222437/assessment-and-outcome-in-non-traditional-cochlear-implant-candidates
#18
Rebecca L Heywood, Deborah A Vickers, Francesca Pinto, George Fereos, Azhar Shaida
The objectives of this study were to assess: (i) patient expectations met as a measure of outcome in early-deafened, late-implanted (non-traditional) cochlear implant recipients and (ii) pre-implantation predictive factors for postoperative speech perception. The notes of 13 recipients were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age at onset of profound deafness was 1.5 years (range 0-6). The mean age at implantation was 37 years (range 22-51 years). Patient expectations were assessed pre-operatively and 1 year after implantation...
February 22, 2017: Audiology & Neuro-otology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221712/discovery-of-myh14-as-an-important-and-unique-deafness-gene-causing-prelingually-severe-autosomal-dominant-non-syndromic-hearing-loss
#19
Bong Jik Kim, Ah Reum Kim, Jin Hee Han, Chung Lee, Doo Yi Oh, Byung Yoon Choi
BACKGROUND: Pathogenic variants of MYH14 have been known to be associated-in either a syndromic or non-syndromic manner-with hearing loss. Interestingly, all reported cases to date of MYH14-related non-syndromic hearing loss with detailed phenotypes have demonstrated mild-to-moderate progressive hearing loss with postlingual onset. METHODS: In this study, targeted resequencing (TRS) of known deafness genes was performed to identify the causative variant in two multiplex families segregating AD inherited hearing loss...
February 21, 2017: Journal of Gene Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220562/systemic-allergic-contact-dermatitis-caused-by-methyl-aminolaevulinate-in-a-patient-with-keratosis-ichthyosis-deafness-syndrome
#20
Aysha Al Malki, Marie-Claude Marguery, Françoise Giordano-Labadie, Maria P Konstantinou, Lorraine Mokeddem, Laurence Lamant, Carle Paul, Aude Maza, Juliette Mazereeuw-Hautier
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Contact Dermatitis
keyword
keyword
33434
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"