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Suhitha Veeravelli, Bijan Najafi, Ivan Marin, Fernando Blumenkron, Shannon Smith, Stephen A Klotz
Approximately 1.2 million people in the United States live with HIV infection. Medical advancements have increased the life expectancy and this cohort is aging. HIV-positive individuals have a high incidence of frailty (~20%) characterized by depression and sedentary behavior. Exercise would be healthy, but due to the frail status of many HIV-positive individuals, conventional exercise is too taxing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of a novel game-based training program (exergame) in ameliorating some aspects of frailty in HIV-infected individuals...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
A S M Iftekhar Uddin, Usman Yaqoob, Gwiy-Sang Chung
Herein we report an enhanced triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on the contact-separation mode between a patterned film of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with a semi-metallic elastomer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and a nylon fiber film. The addition of ethylene glycol to the PEDOT:PSS film improves the functionality of the TENG significantly, yielding promising applicability in both indoor and outdoor (i.e., under sunlight) environments, with the maximum instantaneous power of 0...
October 21, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Shaghayegh Zihajehzadeh, Edward J Park
Walking speed is widely used to study human health status. Wearable inertial measurement units (IMU) are promising tools for the ambulatory measurement of walking speed. Among wearable inertial sensors, the ones worn on the wrist, such as a watch or band, have relatively higher potential to be easily incorporated into daily lifestyle. Using the arm swing motion in walking, this paper proposes a regression model-based method for longitudinal walking speed estimation using a wrist-worn IMU. A novel kinematic variable is proposed, which finds the wrist acceleration in the principal axis (i...
2016: PloS One
Angela Barriga, José M Conejero, Juan Hernández, Elena Jurado, Enrique Moguel, Fernando Sánchez-Figueroa
In the last few years, telerehabilitation and telecare have become important topics in healthcare since they enable people to remain independent in their own homes by providing person-centered technologies to support the individual. These technologies allows elderly people to be assisted in their home, instead of traveling to a clinic, providing them wellbeing and personalized health care. The literature shows a great number of interesting proposals to address telerehabilitation and telecare scenarios, which may be mainly categorized into two broad groups, namely wearable devices and context-aware systems...
October 18, 2016: Sensors
Nina Lefeber, Eva Swinnen, Eric Kerckhofs
PURPOSE: The integration of sufficient cardiovascular stress into robot-assisted gait (RAG) training could combine the benefits of both RAG and aerobic training. The aim was to summarize literature data on the immediate effects of RAG compared to walking without robot-assistance on metabolic-, cardiorespiratory- and fatigue-related parameters. METHODS: PubMed and Web of Science were searched for eligible articles till February 2016. Means, SDs and significance values were extracted...
October 20, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation. Assistive Technology
Hye-Hyeon Byeon, Seung-Woo Lee, Eun-Hee Lee, Woong Kim, Hyunjung Yi
Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Victor E Ezeugwu, Neera Garga, Patricia J Manns
PURPOSE: Understanding the determinants of sedentary behaviour (sitting or lying with low energy expenditure) in stroke survivors can enhance the development of successful behaviour change strategies. This qualitative study explored the perceptions of stroke survivors about sedentary behaviour and ways in which it can be changed. METHODS: An interpretative qualitative inquiry was used with thematic analysis of interview data. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured guide with 13 stroke survivors...
October 19, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Omar F Rahman, Maurice Y Nahabedian, Jeremy C Sinkin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
Sven Reek
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been available for over a decade. In recent years, the device has been prescribed increasingly for a wide range of indications. The purpose of this review is to describe the technical and clinical aspects of the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator. The available literature on safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness is reviewed, and indications for use will be discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: The wearable cardioverter-defibrillator has been used successfully in more than 100 000 patients for a variety of indications...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Cardiology
Hui Li, Jingbo Li, Xiaohong Zhou, Jianrong Zhao, Fengru Zhang, Liqun Wu, Hong Shen, Qing Wan, Jing Huang, Shungang Yang, Ping Wang
Heart failure patients have a high incidence of chronotropic incompetence (CI) that receives less clinical attention. This study assessed a method using wearable devices to identify CI in heart failure patients. Twenty-six heart failure patients (LVEF: 43.9  ±  5.7% with LVEF  ⩾40% in 19 patients; age: 52.8  ±  12.4 years, female patients  =  6) were enrolled. Each patient underwent symptom-limited treadmill maximal exercise testing during which the simultaneous recording of ECG Holter and physical activity using Actigraph was conducted...
October 18, 2016: Physiological Measurement
Zhen Li, Zhiqiang Wei, Lei Huang, Shugang Zhang, Jie Nie
Human activity recognition is important for healthcare and lifestyle evaluation. In this paper, a novel method for activity recognition by jointly considering motion sensor data recorded by wearable smart watches and image data captured by RGB-Depth (RGB-D) cameras is presented. A normalized cross correlation based mapping method is implemented to establish association between motion sensor data with corresponding image data from the same person in multi-person situations. Further, to improve the performance and accuracy of recognition, a hierarchical structure embedded with an automatic group selection method is proposed...
October 15, 2016: Sensors
Steven Steinhubl
Despite having the basic tools necessary to appropriately identify and manage individuals with hypertension for over half a century it remains the single greatest contributing risk factor to morbidity and mortality worldwide today. Since diagnosis and effective treatment availability are not issues, this major failing in care can be attributed to inadequate systems of care: systems that have led to only <20% of hypertensive individuals globally having their blood pressure adequately controlled. Even in the US, where it is one of the most common reasons for a primary care visit, and with over $42...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Jeong Bae Park
Blood pressure fluctuates beat to beat, minute to minute, day and night, day by day and even over longer period. However, changes in blood pressure (BP) itself reflect body's ability to adapt. These fluctuation or variability makes it difficult to diagnose and treat hypertension. And therefore, even though the clinic BP was the standard of BP for more than 100 years, there were many attempts to find other BP effects which influence on prognosis independent from clinical BP since there was the breakout of white coat effect and masked effect in clinic BP...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kazuomi Kario
The essential benefit of the management of hypertension is derived from the blood pressure (BP) lowering per se, indicating the importance of BP throughout 24 hours. Recent guidelines stressed the importance of home BP for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. It is well-known that cardiovascular events occur more frequently in the morning BP levels have been shown to increase during the period from night to early morning. Clinical research using ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) or home BP monitoring has clarified that morning BP and BP surge are more closely related to the cardiovascular risk than office BP (Kario et al...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Seung Woo Park
Rapid progress of mobile information technologies such as wearable sensors, wireless communication, and world-wide use of smartphone cause digital health innovations. In the field of hypertension, wearable blood pressure (BP) monitoring and its wireless transfer to anywhere through smartphone, mobile smartphone apps, and cuffless blood pressure monitoring system are expected to change the way of diagnosis and management of hypertension. Home BP monitoring would be easier and wireless data transfer to health care providers would be common...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Madhab Lamichhane, Joseph C Gardiner, Nicole R Bianco, Steven J Szymkiewicz, Ranjan K Thakur
PURPOSE: The wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) is generally used for short periods of sudden cardiac death (SCD) risk; circumstances may occasionally result in prolonged use (over 1 year). The aim of this study was to determine the benefits and risks of prolonged use in patients with systolic heart failure (HF). METHODS: ZOLL's post-market US database included adult patients (≥18 years) with ischemic and/or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM, NICM) and at least 1 year of use...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology: An International Journal of Arrhythmias and Pacing
R Peng, Z Sonner, A Hauke, E Wilder, J Kasting, T Gaillard, D Swaille, F Sherman, X Mao, J Hagen, R Murdock, J Heikenfeld
Wearable sweat biosensensing technology has dominantly relied on techniques which place planar-sensors or fluid-capture materials directly onto the skin surface. This 'on-skin' approach can result in sample volumes in the μL regime, due to the roughness of skin and/or due to the presence of hair. Not only does this increase the required sampling time to 10's of minutes or more, but it also increases the time that sweat spends on skin and therefore increases the amount of analyte contamination coming from the skin surface...
October 18, 2016: Lab on a Chip
David Hernando, Nuria Garatachea, Rute Almeida, Jose Antonio Casajús, Raquel Bailón
Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis during exercise is an interesting non-invasive tool to measure the cardiovascular response to the stress of exercise. Wearable heart rate monitors are a comfortable option to measure RR intervals while doing physical activities. It is necessary to evaluate the agreement between HRV parameters derived from the RR series recorded by wearable devices and those derived from an ECG during dynamic exercise of low to high intensity.23 male volunteers performed an exercise stress test on a cycle ergometer...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Rainer von Coelln, Lisa M Shulman
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent studies on clinical, genetic and pathological heterogeneity of Parkinson disease have renewed the old debate whether we should think of Parkinson disease as one disease with variations, or as a group of independent diseases that happen to present with similar phenotypes. Here, we provide an overview of where the debate is coming from, and how recent findings in clinical subtyping, genetics and clinico-pathological correlation have shaped this controversy over the last few years...
October 5, 2016: Current Opinion in Neurology
Sairam Parthasarathy, Mary A Carskadon, Girardin Jean-Louis, Judith Owens, Adam Bramoweth, Daniel Combs, Lauren Hale, Elizabeth Harrison, Chantelle N Hart, Brant P Hasler, Sarah M Honaker, Elisabeth Hertenstein, Samuel Kuna, Clete Kushida, Jessica C Levenson, Caitlin Murray, Allan I Pack, Vivek Pillai, Kristi Pruiksma, Azizi Seixas, Patrick Strollo, Saurabh S Thosar, Natasha Williams, Daniel Buysse
A wealth of scientific knowledge is being generated in sleep and circadian science. In order for us to realize the return on investment for such scientific knowledge and to improve the health of the nation, we need to disseminate and implement research findings into practice. An implementation gap - termed a "quality chasm" by the Institutes of Medicine - separates the scientific knowledge we possess and the implementation of such knowledge into preventative interventions or healthcare treatments. It is frequently reported that a time lag of 17 years transpires before medical research reaches clinical practice...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
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